Day Two: Following the Future of Journalism with #ONA17

It’s Day Two at ONA17, as the Online News Association hosts the event in Washington, D.C. from Oct. 5-7. Journalists, educators, and futurists are focused on creating a larger dialogue about where we are and where we could be with digital media. EducationShift will be posting articles in the coming days about education-specific conference topics, but we also are following #ONA17 on social media during the three-day event. If you’d like to get a closer look at the conversations and topics that relate to the intersection of journalism, innovation, and digital media, read this collection of social media posts through Storify:
The post Day Two: Following the Future of Journalism with #ONA17 appeared first on MediaShift.

Following the Future of Journalism with #ONA17

The Online News Association is hosting ONA17 in Washington, D.C., and journalists, educators, and futurists are focused on creating a larger dialogue about where we are and where we could be with digital media. EducationShift will be posting articles in the coming days about education-specific conference topics, but we also are following #ONA17 on social media during the three-day event. If you’d like to get a closer look at the conversations and topics that relate to the intersection of journalism, education and digital media, read this collection of social media posts through Storify:
The post Following the Future of Journalism with #ONA17 appeared first on MediaShift.

Fight Fire with Convergence: J-Schools Must Address Both Anger and Distrust of Media

Although there can be a stark distinction between actual journalists and those “in the media,” the public doesn’t always know the difference. Malice is now directed at both, in the form of digital threats as well as physical violence. The high-profile narrative of the assault of Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs by now-Montana congressman Greg Gianforte raised the visibility of this issue, but it is by far not the only account. It is now all too clear there is a deep sentiment of distrust — and possibly hatred — against journalists. According to NBC’s Bradd Jaffy, the last month has seen journalists “arrested, slapped, pinned against a wall, choke-slammed for trying to do their jobs.” The Washington Post also detailed this string of incidents against reporters, noting that Reporters Without Borders recently lowered the U.S. press freedom index by two spots, ranking it only 43 out of Continue reading "Fight Fire with Convergence: J-Schools Must Address Both Anger and Distrust of Media"

Why Journalism, Education Could Benefit From a Mixed-Methods Approach

Education and journalism are essentially about people and their stories, as well as sharing information that produces prepared citizens for the good of the world. Of course, these are lofty goals, which are realized only in part because educators and journalists are in the trenches each day, fighting valiantly against apathy, ignorance, funding loss, and other barriers. Another current commonality, which isn’t so positive, is a titanic shift from people to numbers – a pivot that, although well-meaning, has had disastrous consequences.

Journalism’s obsession with numbers

Journalism has bought into data. We have seen those statistics be beautifully instructive through visualizations, infographics and in-depth reporting. We have also seen interpretations of that data be wrong, namely in the results of Brexit and the 2016 U.S. election. Journalists are, of course, struggling with those outcomes still, and media are working to counterbalance what some have seen as an overreliance on numbers versus
Continue reading "Why Journalism, Education Could Benefit From a Mixed-Methods Approach"