Can virtual reality improve juvenile justice reporting?


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    By Susannah Nesmith Students at Kennesaw State University outside of Atlanta are set to embark on a fascinating experiment in using virtual reality technology to bring to life the stories of children caught in the juvenile justice system. The project, which recently received a $35,000 grant from the Online News Association’s $1M Challenge Fund for Innovation in Journalism Education, aims to create...

The Guardian’s Alan Rusbridger: putting fossil-fuel divestment on the agenda


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    By Alison Langley AFTER ALAN RUSBRIDGER ANNOUNCED last December that he would step down as editor of The Guardian, he looked back on his 20 years at the helm of one of the UK’s best known papers and asked himself, "Do I have anything to regret?" One thing stood out: his paper hadn’t done justice to the subject of climate change. As he...

The difference between ‘blond’ and ‘blonde’ you might not expect


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    By Merrill Perlman Many languages give gender to their nouns, but not English, though that was not always the case. Until about the 1200s, English had masculine and feminine nouns, the way French, Spanish, Italian, and German still do.  We still have some holdovers, however, at least two of them related to hair coloring. But, as in so many things English,...

Factchecking’s impact


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    By David Uberti Political factchecking has grown up over the course of the past three presidential elections. Launched in 2003, FactCheck.org examined candidates’ claims during the 2004 campaign and was even incorrectly cited by Vice President Dick Cheney during a debate. The then-nascent PolitiFact.com analyzed more than 750 political statements throughout the 2008 cycle, garnering a Pulitzer Prize for its efforts. The genre...

Factchecking’s impact

    By David Uberti Political factchecking has grown up over the course of the past three presidential elections. Launched in 2003, FactCheck.org examined candidates’ claims during the 2004 campaign and was even incorrectly cited by Vice President Dick Cheney during a debate. The then-nascent PolitiFact.com analyzed more than 750 political statements throughout the 2008 cycle, garnering a Pulitzer Prize for its efforts. The genre...

Why Ohio’s new ‘Sunshine Audits’ could be important


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    By Jonathan Peters When a member of the public believes a state agency has violated a public-records law, who gets to be the referee? That question is at the core of a colorful political affair that recently unfolded in Ohio, one that pitted Republicans from different branches of state government against one another—and underscored the importance of programs that can resolve public-records disputes...

How a Pulitzer-winning series forced South Carolina to face its domestic violence problem


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    By Corey Hutchins From the time its first installment was published, “Til Death Do Us Part,” a powerful series about domestic abuse in South Carolina from the Charleston Post and Courier, seemed destined for Pulitzer Prize contention. And on Monday, the seven-part series was honored with the nation's most prestigious journalism prize, the Pulitzer for public service. Judges called the work...

Why The New York Times apps look different


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    By Alexis Sobel Fitts “The battle will be won on the smartphone,” New York Times CEO Mark Thompson said at a tech conference last February.  The paper’s readers have increasingly been coming from mobile in recent years, and the Times has responded with a fleet of apps designed to draw in small, niche audiences to the paper. The NYT Cooking app, an...

5 takeaways from the 2015 Pulitzer Prizes


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    By The Editors Despite new rules that brought magazines into contention, and continued economic and editorial disruption throughout the media, the 99th annual Pulitzer Prizes were again dominated by newspapers this year. Winners of the awards, announced Monday at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, ranged from national media giants to local dailies. Here are five more takeaways from this...

Florida railroad project opponents largely ignored by Miami Herald


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    By Susannah Nesmith MIAMI, FL — A planned expansion of passenger rail in south and central Florida could be a big deal for the region, but coverage has been decidedly hyperlocal—and not in a good way. The project, All Aboard Florida, is being touted as a privately funded project to offer express passenger service between downtown Miami and the Orlando airport, with stops...