Word up! This is the story behind The New York Times’ most famous tweet (which is 10 years old today)

In March 2007, New York Times developer Jacob Harris had some spare time and decided to create a Times account on a fledgling service that is today the preferred communication platform for the president of the United States. Harris set up @nytimes and wrote the code that powered it in an afternoon. “Using twitter’s APIs, I was able to get headlines from the New York Times feeds to my cell phone with only an idle afternoon and a few lines of Ruby,” he wrote later. The account ran off an RSS feed of the Times’ top stories, tweeting out just the headlines. By the middle of March, it had accrued all of 72 followers, most of whom were either Harris’s friends or other developers.

“My goal in public media”: How 16 producers worked to create more community-focused journalism

Jess Mador has driven the revamped 1980s-era bread truck all over Knoxville and other towns in eastern Tennessee. The truck has the Knoxville skyline painted on its side along with TRUCKBEAT in bold red letters. Inside, there’s a sound booth. The truck was the central component of a project launched by Mador along with WUOT, the public radio station in Knoxville, to get out into the community and reach new listeners. They travelled to street festivals, community health fairs, and other local events to interact with people throughout the region. “There’s something disarming about the truck; it’s a physical, tangible engagement tool…that’s eye-catching and fun, which was part of the idea behind its design,” Mador said recently. “We were able to build buzz and excitement for TruckBeat, and people seemed to want to be part of what we were doing in a different way than with a conventional journalism project
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This is what could happen if Donald Trump’s plan to eliminate funding for public broadcasting is enacted

President Trump on Thursday released his administration’s first budget blueprint, which among other cuts proposes eliminating all federal funding to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. CPB has an annual budget of $445 million that it uses to support PBS, NPR, and local public broadcasters across the United States, and cuts to it and other agencies are being proposed to offset, among other things, Trump’s planned $54 billion increase in defense spending. (The Washington Post reported that the requested boost in Pentagon funding would fund CPB at its current levels for the next 121 years.) “Viewers and listeners appreciate that public media is non-commercial and available for free to all Americans,” CPB president and CEO Patricia Harrison said in a statement Thursday. “We will work with the new Administration and Congress in raising awareness that elimination of federal funding to CPB begins the collapse of the public media system itself Continue reading "This is what could happen if Donald Trump’s plan to eliminate funding for public broadcasting is enacted"

Discors wants people to pay for news via a low-priced subscription that crosses multiple publishers

When we last wrote about the app Discors, back at its launch in 2015, its strategy was to provide users additional context around the news by featuring commentary from contributors from places such as universities and think tanks. But the company quickly realized that the concept wasn’t going to work. “It was going to be very difficult to get people to pay for that,” CEO and cofounder Basil Enan told me. So, in true startup fashion, it pivoted. This month, the company launched a revamped version of its app that moved away from highlighting individual contributors and instead lets users access commentary and analysis from publishers such as The New York Times, The Financial Times, The Washington Post, and The Economist for a monthly price. A subscription to the app costs $4.99 per month. The main screen of the Discors app lists stories by topic — such as
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Knight announces revamped Prototype Fund focused on misinformation and trust in media

The Knight Foundation spent most of the past year undertaking a planning process to figure out how to optimize its work for the next decade. As part of that effort, it took a year off from awarding grants from the Knight Prototype Fund, an initiative to help fund early stage media projects.

On Monday, Knight said it is relaunching a revamped Prototype Fund that will now award winners $50,000 — up from $35,000 — and focus on more specific themes that will allow grant winners to try out various approaches to a single problem. Winners will now have nine months to work on their projects, and Knight plans to introduce new ways to offer training and share findings.

The first topic the new Prototype Fund will focus on is misinformation and trust in media.

Knight announced the topic of the call last month, but Monday released more details on Continue reading "Knight announces revamped Prototype Fund focused on misinformation and trust in media"

Google-backed AMP pages are coming to some of Asia’s most popular search engines

Three of the leading search engines in Asia said on Tuesday that they would begin supporting Google’s AMP pages.

Baidu, China’s largest search engine, and Sogou, another Chinese search engine, said that AMP pages would now show up in search results there. In Japan, Yahoo Japan, which is among the country’s most popular websites, will also show AMP pages.

In a talk today at Google’s AMP developer conference, Google vice president of engineering David Besbris said the addition of the Asian platforms “tremendously increase the reach of where AMP pages can go,” according to a TechCrunch report.

Google launched the AMP page format in the fall of 2015 in attempt to speed up the mobile web — and also to combat Facebook’s speedy Instant Articles, which debuted that spring. (The AMP logo even looks a little Facebooky.)

Forbes rebuilt its new mobile website as a Progressive Web App

With its intersitial quotes and lengthy load times, Forbes is “known for having a slower site than average and a more hefty ad experience,” Salah Zalatimo, Forbes’ senior VP of product development told me.

That’s why Forbes on Tuesday is beginning the public roll out of its new mobile site, which it says loads in 0.8 seconds — down from anywhere from 3 to 12 seconds on its current mobile site.

The new mobile site is a Progressive Web App, a Google-backed mobile web format that looks and functions a bit more like a native app — but most importantly loads quickly.

PWAs work on all mobile devices, but they have added functionality on Android, where users can add them to their homescreen like a native app. Once Android users take that step, Forbes’ PWA will work offline and be able to send push notifications.

As part of

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