Start your meetings with a folk song — and other ideas from the community-driven, crowdfunded Danish news site Zetland

— Every Tuesday, the entire staff of the Danish news site Zetland gathers for a meeting around a long wooden table in the conference room of its airy office in a formerly industrial area of the city. < blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> At its events, Zetland journalists would get on stage and share stories, conduct interviews, and put on performances. These stories were often attendees’ first introduction to the site’s reporting. “It was in garages at the beginning, but it turned out that it hit something and we could sell out in eight minutes,” Korsgaard said. “That was the entry for most people. That’s how they got to know us and then they discovered: Wow, they also do written journalism.” But it proved difficult to build a business off of the singles. Zetland’s team hoped that Amazon would formally launch in Denmark, which could help with sales, but Amazon still hasn’t. While readers could
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This tool is helping newsrooms collaborate on factchecking and verification projects

In the run-up to the French election this spring, 37 organizations came together to form CrossCheck, a collaborative factchecking effort that, over 10 weeks, debunked 60 misleading and false stories. As part of its reporting processes, CrossCheck had to coordinate between newsrooms and keep track of multiple stories at once. To manage the workflow, the team turned to Check, an open web–based verification tool developed by Meedan, a group working to build non-commercial tools for journalists and non-profit groups. “If we had not had Check there as a tool, it would’ve been very difficult to manage that workflow,” said Sam Dubberley, CrossCheck’s managing editor. “It meant that people from different organizations could go in, see that the verification had been done, and then contribute or say, ‘I don’t agree with that,’ ‘I agree with that,’ or ‘I’ve seen something that might mean it’s true or not’ and
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This Danish startup evolved into a “newsletter company” because that was what its readers wanted

— Every weekday at noon, subscribers to the Danish news site Føljeton receive an emoji-filled email notification or push alert. That’s when the site publishes its daily briefing, which has evolved into its core editorial product over its nearly two years of existence. It’s published as an email newsletter, in Føljeton’s app, and on its website. The briefing features a mix of original reporting that focuses on a single topic each week (“føljeton” means “serialize” in Danish) — cultural writing, an editorial, and curated links to other outlets around the Internet. “I think of us as service providers, basically,” CEO Søren Høgh Ipland told me when I visited Copenhagen this spring. “We’re building a routine, a product you get every day, a feeling, something that you buy,” he said. “Of course, we’re trying to involve our readers, but it’s like buying a cup of coffee every day.” A subscription
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People who get news from social or search usually don’t remember the news org that published it, survey finds

British news consumers who get news via social media or search platforms are more likely to remember the platform where they accessed a particular story rather than the outlet that originally published it, according to a study out Wednesday from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford. Just 37 percent of users who came from search, and 47 percent of those who found a story via social media, could correctly name the news organization that published it (2 days later). By comparison, 81 percent of users who directly arrived on a story could later recall where it was published. Meanwhile, 57 percent of users could remember that they found a story via search and 67 percent recalled accessing stories from social sources — with 70 percent of those who found a story on Facebook recalling their path and 60 percent for Twitter. “The finding
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With a network of sites across the U.S., this company is trying to redefine local fitness content

Working out and getting healthy can be hard for a lot of people. Brothers Anthony and Joe Vennare know this. The Pittsburgh natives had previously owned a gym before deciding to get into the content business when they saw a void in locally focused health and fitness coverage. “A lot of times people are put off by diet hacks and workout plans in Men’s Health and Women’s Health,” said Joe, Fitt’s COO. “What we said, and continue to believe, is that nobody wants to be unhealthy, and if they can get healthy in whatever definition that means for them and have fun doing it, that’s kind of the ultimate.” That’s the thinking behind Fitt, their bootstrapped network of local fitness sites, which now operates in 16 different U.S. cities with another seven slated to launch soon. The sites feature stories such as “Summer Long Schedule of Continue reading "With a network of sites across the U.S., this company is trying to redefine local fitness content"

Slate’s first virtual-reality talk show was “a hilarious disaster”

If, hypothetically, Georgia and Florida went to war, which state would win? That was one of the questions posed to actress Carrie Preston in the first episode of Conundrums, Slate’s new virtual reality Facebook Live talk show that launched Thursday. Preston and host Dan Kois, Slate’s culture editor, were presented as legless avatars as the show is produced using Facebook’s VR app Spaces, which was launched earlier this year as a way for Oculus Rift users to interact with each other as avatars. Facebook this week announced that it was adding a livestreaming feature to Spaces, and Slate says it is the first outlet to utilize this platform in this way. Kois and Preston began their conversation outside of a Brooklyn-based brewery that’s sponsoring the show before using the magic Continue reading "Slate’s first virtual-reality talk show was “a hilarious disaster”"

A new report says Democrats and Republicans actually get news in pretty similar ways

Though Republicans and Democrats have differing — and well documented — views of the media, members of both parties still follow the news and access media in similar ways, according to a study out Thursday from The Associated Press, the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, and the American Press Institute. Similar percentages of Democrats and Republicans said they get news multiple times a day, actively seek out news, get news on social media, pay for news, and get news from local sources regularly, the study found. 72 percent of Democrats and 71 percent of Republicans said they get news more than one time a day. 75 percent of people in both parties get news on social media. 58 percent of Democrats and 56 percent of Republicans say they pay for news. One-quarter of Democrats and 21 percent of those in the GOP said they routinely access local news sources.
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