Stat is publishing a print section in Sunday’s Boston Globe — and it might be coming to a paper near you

Last month, Stat, the health and life science news site, published a story about insect detectives: entomologists who encounter people who falsely believe that their homes or bodies are infested by bugs. The story received a fair amount of attention when it was originally published online, but this Sunday a whole new audience will be exposed to the story by Stat reporter Eric Boodman. Boodman’s piece is the cover story for Sunday Stat, a new print product Stat is launching in partnership with The Boston Globe. The Globe and Stat are both owned by John W. Henry, and
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The Financial Times started a mergers and acquisitions newsletter for its highest-paying subscribers

After a short trip to China where he met with business and government leaders, Financial Times editor Lionel Barber was faced with a conundrum that many journalists know well. Barber co-wrote a number of stories for the FT based on the interviews he conducted, but he still had interesting material pertaining to mergers and acquisitions that he couldn’t quite fit into any of his other pieces. While those tidbits might previously have never made it out of his notebook, Barber was able to repurpose the information for Due Diligence, a new, subscriber-only M&A newsletter that the Financial Times launched last month.
Arash Massoudi, the FT’s London-based M&A and corporate finance correspondent, is the newsletter’s lead writer, along with James Fontanella-Khan, the paper’s New York–based M&A correspondent. They work with the rest of the paper’s corporate reporters to produce the newsletter Tuesday through Friday. It’s sent out at Continue reading "The Financial Times started a mergers and acquisitions newsletter for its highest-paying subscribers"

A Boston Globe memo puts the spotlight on an emerging consensus on how to transform metro papers

The Boston Globe on Monday published a memo from editor Brian McGrory outlining the latest steps the paper is taking to restructure its newsroom as it adjusts to the evolving journalistic landscape. The Globe plan focuses on publishing stories earlier in the day, restructuring beats, creating new audience engagement and express desks, and thinking of print as its own distinct platform, not the dominant driver of all workflows. “None of the changes detailed here will come as any surprise, though in total, they represent significant change,” McGrory wrote:
The basic goals are familiar as well: to be more nimble, more innovative, and more inclined to take worthwhile risk; to get our best journalism in front of readers when and where they want to read it, throughout the day and across all our platforms; to be relentlessly interesting, jettisoning any sense of obligation in our report; to once and for all Continue reading "A Boston Globe memo puts the spotlight on an emerging consensus on how to transform metro papers"

The French magazine L’Obs is using Facebook Messenger to follow undecided voters

Over the past few weeks leading up to the first votes in the French presidential election on April 23, Léa, an unemployed 25-year-old from Vendee, a region on the country’s western coast, has changed her mind about who she plans to vote for at least three times. First she planned on casting her ballot for centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron, then she was thinking of voting for the National Front’s Marine Le Pen, and now she’s supporting a candidate from a small party. Léa has been tracking her preference as part of an experiment run by L’Obs, a French newsweekly. The magazine is following four undecided voters from around the country and across the political spectrum to see how they’re thinking about the upcoming election. It’s using a Facebook Messenger bot to share their stories and update readers. L’Obs launched the Messenger bot last month, and it’s
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A Croatian news app starts with the premise that news discovery has become too personalized

The news and information we consume is becoming increasingly tailored to our interests and habits. Our Facebook feeds are algorithmically controlled, and publishers such as The New York Times — which is reportedly planning a personalized homepage — are also attempting to mold their content to readers’ preferences. A new app, however, is trying to depersonalize the news. The app, Twain, which was created in Croatia and launched on iOS last Friday in the U.S. App Store, attempts to provide users an overview of the stories that are trending across the Internet that they might not otherwise see. Twain has no human editors. Instead, it relies on “100 custom-designed algorithms and processes” to scan sites around the internet and judge what’s most popular at that moment, said Twain founder Miran Pavic, who is also content director for Croatian news site Telegram. Many of the factors that the
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The Times of London says focus on editions has driven digital growth

Minutes after the attack in central London last month, news organizations all around the world rolled out their breaking news coverage, booting up live blogs and tweeting out the latest developments. The Times of London, like other outlets, posted a story within 10 to 15 minutes of the 2:40 p.m. attack, but it mostly stayed away from that continual style of reporting. “We’re not liveblogging. These are not rolling stories that have new information flowing into them every 30 seconds and have lots of tweets,” said Nick Petrie, the Times’ deputy head of digital. “It’s the best knowledge we have at the time from our reporters. Then we looked at that throughout the day if appropriate, but we were pretty much back to a 5 p.m. edition two-and-a-half hours later. The rolling coverage didn’t continue into the evening like it did on BBC News, The Guardian, and
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The Washington Post wants your help to cover (and fact-check) congressional town halls

Members of Congress are back in their districts this week for the start of a two-week recess, and as the senators and representatives hold town halls and meet constituents, The Washington Post is asking its readers to help its coverage by sharing video and audio clips from meetings they attend. “We’ll take suggestions for any topic that piques your interest, though we’re especially interested in health care, immigration, actions taken by President Trump’s administration, and the federal budget,” Post Fact Checker reporter Michelle Ye Hee Lee wrote in a letter to readers on the Post’s website. The Post is asking readers to focus on senators who are up for re-election in 2018 and representatives who are in potential swing districts. Given the heightened political climate, the Post Continue reading "The Washington Post wants your help to cover (and fact-check) congressional town halls"