The Safari browser update that’s driving marketers crazy


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Apple Safari's second iteration of Intelligent Tracking Prevention, or "ITP2"which prevents tracking cookies from working in the open webhas been causing havoc among marketers since it launched. Apple introduced its first version of ITP in 2017, but companies such as Google and Criteo quickly found workarounds to maintain the status quo. That prompted Apple to introduce a newer, stricter version last September. The problem Currently, a Safari user who visits Patagonia's site looking for a cotton quilt pullover, for example, can't be targeted with ads from the retailer elsewhere on the web. The same applies if that shopper abandons the Patagonia shopping cart with said pullover in itPatagonia can't target the shopper with that item on other sites. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Apple’s ‘greedy’ move. Plus, creative (and creepy) Valentine’s Day campaigns: Wednesday Wake-Up Call


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Welcome to Ad Age's Wake-Up Call, our daily roundup of advertising, marketing, media and digital news. You can get an audio version of this briefing on your Alexa device. Search for "Ad Age" under "Skills" in the Alexa app. What people are talking about today Apple is reportedly working on a subscription service that's similar to Spotify, but for magazines and publications instead of music. For $10 a month, you'd get an all-you-can-read offer, Ad Age's Garett Sloane reports. But there's a serious downside for publishers: Apple wants half the proceeds, he writes. Sloane talked to two publishing executives who shared details but who asked that their names not be used. "It's a shitty deal," one publishing executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told Sloane. "It seems greedy." Continue reading at AdAge.com

The new game that just overtook ‘Fortnite’ on Twitch


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





If you haven't heard of "Apex Legends," there's a reason for that. Despite being a big-budget title from well-known gamemaker EA ("Madden," "FIFA," "Battlefield"), "Apex Legends," which this weekend dethroned video-game phenomenon "Fortnite" in a number of areas, launched without advertising. Released about a week ago, "Apex Legends" is similar to "Fortnite" in that it is a free, online multiplayer video game in which players go head-to-head in a battle royale style (think last man standing). The game captured 2.5 million players within the first day of its release and, two days later, that number climbed to a record-breaking 10 million playersa milestone that took previous record-holder "Fortnite" two weeks to achieve. And "Apex Legends" became the most watched stream on Twitch this past weekend, garnering some 300,000 active viewers, or about three-times that of "Fortnite," according to Twitch data. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Financial Times says it’s making bank off its newsletter, Due Diligence


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





The Financial Times says that it's growing its paid subscriber base and ad revenue thanks to Due Diligence, the publication's two-year-old newsletter. Due Diligence has more than 30,000 subscribers and, during its first year in 2018, sold its entire ad inventory within several months after launch, according to FT. Due Diligence 2019 ad revenue, it adds, is already surpassing last year by 30 percent. It declined to share specifics. Now, the publication is adding video to the newsletter, and expanding into members-only forums (the Due Diligence Forum). One will be held in London and the other, announced Friday, in New York. Those interested in attending must have a premium membership. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Sprint files federal lawsuit against AT&T for its 5Ge marketing


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Sprint filed a federal lawsuit against AT&T on Thursday, claiming the telecom carrier is practicing a misleading marketing campaign around the fifth generation of mobile technology, or 5G. Many experts believe that the techwhich could deliver speeds that are 100 to 200-times faster than 4Gwon't arrive at scale for at least another two years. While a 5G smartphone has yet to be released, AT&T updated its phones to replace the "LTE" symbol commonly found atop of its consumer's mobile screens with "5Ge," which some say suggests that its phones are ready for the fifth generation of mobile tech. Continue reading at AdAge.com

How retail brands can survive the attack of the algorithm


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





The combination of algorithms and retail is irresistible. By matching supply and demand as closely as possible, they learn about our preferences and shopping behaviors, predict what we'd like, develop tailored recommendationsand increase the likelihood of a transaction. That's why there's an entire new industry emerging around shopping aggregators and wardrobe-curation services. By turning products, services and content into commodities, algorithms, by default, are the opposite of brands. Some investors have even concluded that algorithms will replace the role of brands in conveying trust and guiding us through our choices. That's why the modern test of brand strength is its resistance to the algorithm. The true challenge for retail, then, is not how to accelerate algorithm-induced product commoditization, but how to circumvent it. Continue reading at AdAge.com

How to survive the attack of the algorithm


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





The combination of algorithms and retail is irresistible. By matching supply and demand as closely as possible, they learn about our preferences and shopping behaviors, predict what we'd like, develop tailored recommendationsand increase the likelihood of a transaction. That's why there's an entire new industry emerging around shopping aggregators and wardrobe-curation services. By turning products, services and content into commodities, algorithms, by default, are the opposite of brands. Some investors have even concluded that algorithms will replace the role of brands in conveying trust and guiding us through our choices. That's why the modern test of brand strength is its resistance to the algorithm. The true challenge for retail, then, is not how to accelerate algorithm-induced product commoditization, but how to circumvent it. Continue reading at AdAge.com

AT&T snags NBA sponsor title away from Verizon


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





AT&T became the next official wireless sponsor of the National Basketball League on Tuesday, a title it snagged from longtime rival Verizon. At the same time, Verizon isn't completely going away, as it will continue sponsoring the NBA, only not as the official wireless provider. The news is significant as it comes at a time when the mudslinging between carriers for 5G dominance has escalated. Continue reading at AdAge.com

For Generation Z the digital experience is the human experience


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Today your digital life is every bit as important as your analog life because everything starts online, from the way people connect and interact with one another to how they do business or entertain themselves. The digital experience not only informs our human experience, it is inseparable from it. Gen Z is responsible for this generational shift in attitude. Those born after 1996 have been digital natives their whole lives and consequently have far higher and different expectations when it comes to the types of digital experiences they will engage with. If you represent a brand or an agency and you haven't started thinking about Gen Z, your competition most certainly has. Members of this group of consumers already control at least $50 billion in spending power, they've started entering the workforce and by 2020 they will make up the largest bloc of consumers in the world. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Reddit aims to lure more brands with new ad product


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Reddit is expanding the types of ads it offers marketers, hoping its latest product, cost-for-click ads, will woo a different sort of advertiser onto its platform. Cost-for-click ads, more commonly known as "CPC," charge advertisers for each click that's made. They're widely regarded as lower-funnel and are a pillar of direct response marketers, who use CPC ads to make sales, or have consumers take a specific action. Although CPC is new for Reddit, the ad format itself is old, and was first popularized shortly after Google launched search advertising in 1999. Continue reading at AdAge.com

T-Mobile confirms it’s returning to its sixth consecutive Super Bowl


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





T-Mobile confirmed Monday that it's returning to the Super Bowl, marking it the carrier's sixth consecutive appearance. John Legere, CEO at T-Mobile, shared the news to his 6 million followers on Twitter with a 2-second clip showing nothing but a football emoji: That's right!! @TMobile is back in the Super Bowl AGAIN!! See you Sunday!! pic.twitter.com/XA550wPkY5 Continue reading at AdAge.com

Google Cloud, looking to invade Amazon’s turf, inks deal with OpenX


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





It's common knowledge in ad tech circles that Amazon's AWS cloud services dominate among advertising technology companies. But Google Cloud is looking to play catch up with its offering. Although Google is a stalwart in the ad tech arena, its cloud offering currnetly has little to no market penetration in the ad tech space. On Thursday, however, it inked a five year, $110 million deal with ad exchange network OpenX. It's the first time that Google Cloud has struck a deal with a well-known, or large exchange, according to both companies. "We are making a radical change here," Tim Cadogan, CEO at OpenX, says. "We are saying, 'no,' it's time to make a radical change so it can enable us to offer more benefits for publishers and marketers to innovate at an aggressive rate; we must shift gears and make step improvements, and that is our quest for the year. Continue reading "Google Cloud, looking to invade Amazon’s turf, inks deal with OpenX"

Salesforce moves to provide analytics for ‘consumer journeys’


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





In the advertising world, customer journeys are all the rage. "They are so hot right now," says Anne Hunter, exec VP of strategy and growth at Kantar. "Marketers want to know all the things a customer did before they took action, or what motivated them to go from point A to point B to point C? What was the need they had and what did they learn to make that decision?" Yet while the data certainly exists to map out so-called consumer journeys, analytics tools are often lacking, and instead simply provide insights into how many people visited a specific website, or opened an email. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Spotify and Pandora duke it out for podcasting dominance


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Marketers go where the eyeballs are, but digital audio giants Spotify and Pandora are placing their bets less on screen time and more on ear time. Both companies recently said they've marked podcasts as an area for significant growth and are investing heavily in exclusive shows and tech to lure users away from Android and iOS' native podcasting apps and onto their respective platforms. "One of the key attractions with podcasts is the incredible sexiness of the demographic," says James McQuivey, VP and principal analyst at Forrester Research. "They're the hyper-educated types that used to only be available through sources like The Atlantic or even NPR sponsorships, but now they abound in podcast land." Continue reading at AdAge.com

Spotify and Pandora duke it out for podcasting prominence


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Marketers go where the eyeballs are, but digital audio giants Spotify and Pandora are placing their bets less on screen time and more on ear time. Both companies recently said they've marked podcasts as an area for significant growth and are investing heavily in exclusive shows and tech to lure users away from Android and iOS' native podcasting apps and onto their respective platforms. "One of the key attractions with podcasts is the incredible sexiness of the demographic," says James McQuivey, VP and principal analyst at Forrester Research. "They're the hyper-educated types that used to only be available through sources like The Atlantic or even NPR sponsorships, but now they abound in podcast land." Continue reading at AdAge.com

Ad Age grades its industry predictions for 2018


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





It's that time of year when pundits -- including Ad Age's own reporters and editors -- make predictions about what will happen in the coming year. You can find our prognostications for 2019 here. In the meantime, we look back at what we suggested would happen in 2018 to see how accurate we were. Jeanine Poggi, senior editor, media & technology Continue reading at AdAge.com

Why TV will undergo a year of rapid marketing evolution


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





From changes in consumers' use of technology to data advancements and corporate consolidation, 2018 brought a pace of change that was both unprecedented and unforgiving. I often describe the marketing business as existing in alternative realities. While rapid change and innovation continues, some parts of the industry remain largely unchangedalternative realities locked in a bit of a time vortex. The linear TV business continues to operate in the upfront and scatter models, locked into age/sex demographic currencies and largely measured the same way it has for decades. This will not be the case much longer. Addressable TV is finally starting to get traction. Over-the-top (OTT) and connected TVs are scaling faster than predicted. Mobile is the predominant platform for certain consumers. Google and Facebook continue to dominate the digital landscape. And, for $12 a month, consumers can binge on nearly endless (ad-free) premium content on any device they choose. Continue Continue reading "Why TV will undergo a year of rapid marketing evolution"

Walmart and Pepsi go big at the Golden Globes. And Apple trolls competitors at CES: Monday Wake-Up Call


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Welcome to Ad Age's Wake-Up Call, our daily roundup of advertising, marketing, media and digital news. You can get an audio version of this briefing on your Alexa device. Search for "Ad Age" under "Skills" in the Alexa app. What people are talking about today If you skipped last night's Golden Globes on NBC, you not only missed Lady Gaga's matching blue gown and hair, you missed a few big-budget commercials loaded with special effects. Walmart plugged its grocery pickup service in four spots featuring beloved movie cars, from the Batmobile to the DeLorean from "Back to the Future" to Scooby Doo's Mystery Machine, writes Ad Age's Jack Neff. The work is from Publicis Groupe-led Department W; check it out here, and be prepared to have "Cars" from Gary Numan be your Monday morning earworm. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Google remakes ‘Home Alone,’ and Budweiser’s owner gets into cannabis: Thursday Wake-Up Call


This post is by Kate Kaye from Ad Age - Digital


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Welcome to Ad Age's Wake-Up Call, our daily roundup of advertising, marketing, media and digital news. You can get an audio version of this briefing on your Alexa device. Search for "Ad Age" under "Skills" in the Alexa app. What people are talking about today Just in time for the holidays, Google made a funny, charming remake of "Home Alone," with a 38-year-old Macaulay Culkin reprising the role he played as a kid. This time, he's a little less alone, though, because he has a Google Assistant to entertain him and help with household tasks. As Ad Age's Ann-Christine Diaz writes, the ad is a way for the tech giant to insert itself into a classic holiday tale. As the nostalgia washes over you, you might even forget momentarily about 2018's big backlash against Google and Facebook. Who doesn't have fond holiday memories of "Home Alone"? Continue reading at AdAge.com