“Media is broken,” so Medium’s launching a $5/month member program that offers small upgrades

In its attempt to find a new business model for publishing after its previous one failed to make money, Medium is rolling out a membership program that will cost $5 a month to start and sounds like a little bit Spotify, a little bit Patreon, and a little bit Pocket. Founder and CEO Ev Williams wrote in a blog post Wednesday:
For $5 per month (introductory price), you’ll get two upgraded aspects: A better reading experience: We’ve been working on a whole new reading experience, which I’m excited for you to see. It’s based on the premise that, instead of yet another never-ending feed, people would be much happier with a limited set of carefully curated stories, chosen by experts among topics we care about. Something that is completable, satisfying, and puts you in control. If you read Medium regularly, I think you’ll find this new feature set
Continue reading "“Media is broken,” so Medium’s launching a $5/month member program that offers small upgrades"

From coal to broadband to Trump’s budget, The Daily Yonder reports on rural life for the people actually living it

Donald Trump’s unveiling of his budget blueprint last week — and the ensuing analysis and criticism — was probably the first many urban readers had heard of the Appalachian Regional Commission, one of the initiatives he proposes cutting completely. But The Daily Yonder has been reporting on these issues for a long time. The urban-rural divide has been one of the biggest points of discussion following the election, in which rural voters overwhelmingly chose Donald Trump. And while large news organizations have pledged to pay more attention to that division — at the beginning of the year, The Washington Post assigned a reporter to the divide specifically — the Yonder focuses on the people who have a connection to rural communities because they live in them, used to live in them, or work in them, by reporting on specific issues in depth. A sampling of recent stories: “Trump’s Continue reading "From coal to broadband to Trump’s budget, The Daily Yonder reports on rural life for the people actually living it"

Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it

From new mottos to television advertising campaigns, news organizations are refocusing efforts on why their readers should trust them. But new research suggests they should also focus on who their “ambassadors” are: The main factor in determining a reader’s trust in an article appears to be who shared it, not the news organization that published it, according to a study out Monday from The Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. People say that the news organization matters to them a lot, and a 2016 study by the Media Insight Project found that Americans said the original news source was the biggest “cue” they used to help determine whether they trusted the content in an article they found on Facebook. “We wanted to test whether that was really true, or whether people just believed that was Continue reading "Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it"

Harvard Library gets slammed for its earnest fake news guide: Updates from the fake news world

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Harvard librarians probably didn’t guess the blowback they were in for when they published this innocent online guide to “Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda”. The guide, which includes otherwise useful/basic tips like “using library databases is a near-foolproof way to find credible information”, also links to Merrimack College professor Melissa Zimdars’ sprawling and much-debated list of “False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and/or Satirical ‘News’ Sources,” which currently includes 921 sites tagged in a number of categories including “fake,” “satire,” “conspiracy,” “unreliable,” and “political.” Sites like Fusion, National Review, and The Onion are listed alongside actual fake news sites like denverguardian.com and David Duke’s website. (Also on the list: IJR, the only site that got Continue reading "Harvard Library gets slammed for its earnest fake news guide: Updates from the fake news world"

Biblioteca de Harvard atacada pelo seu guia sobre “notícias falsas”

É difícil manter-se a par do fluxo crescente de notícias e dados sobre as fake news, a desinformação, a informação parcial e a literacia mediática. Este resumo semanal apresenta os destaques das histórias que pode ter perdido.

Separar as águas

Os bibliotecários de Harvard provavelmente não adivinhavam as reacções que iam receber quando publicaram um inocente guia online sobre Notícias falsas, desinformação e propaganda. O guia, que inclui algumas dicas úteis/básicas como “usar bases de dados de bibliotecas é uma maneira praticamente infalível de encontrar informação credível”, também contém ligações à lista extensa e muito debatida de Fontes de “notícias” falsas, enganadoras, click-bait e satíricas, da autoria de Melissa Zimdars, professora na Merrimack College. Esta lista inclui actualmente 921 sites catalogados de acordo com várias categorias que incluem “falso”, “sátira”, “conspiração”, “pouco fiável” e “partidário”. Páginas como o Fusion, o National Review e o The Onion são apresentadas Continue reading "Biblioteca de Harvard atacada pelo seu guia sobre “notícias falsas”"

FOIA the Dead uses The New York Times’ obituaries to shine a light on FBI surveillance, for the living

“Reader, would you be surprised to learn that you had been a terrorist suspect?” The author William T. Vollmann wrote in Harper’s in 2013 about the process of FOIAing his FBI file and discovering that he had been a Unabomber suspect. Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates uncovered an FBI file for his father, William Paul Coates, a Black Panther in Baltimore. “I thought of Hoover’s FBI, which harassed three generations of black activists,” he wrote in his Atlantic cover story “My President Was Black”: “Whether this generation of black activists and their allies should be afraid.” Parker Higgins hopes to track down more stories like these with his new project, FOIA the Dead. Higgins first became familiar with the FOIA process and transparency activism at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, where he worked for five years as a copyright activist. “The obituary page has always fascinated me,” he said, “not Continue reading "FOIA the Dead uses The New York Times’ obituaries to shine a light on FBI surveillance, for the living"

This email newsletter raised $300K from its (affluent, largely Silicon Valley–based) readers in 55 hours

Launching a general-interest tech and business news site these days seems like kind of a dumb idea — there’s way too much competition. It doesn’t seem that much smarter in email newsletter form — until you learn that The Hustle has grown to 300,000 subscribers in less than a year, is profitable, and just raised over a million dollars from Silicon Valley and an additional $300,000 from readers.

“Wait, really?” is a thing that I said several times in my interview with Sam Parr, founder and CEO of the San Francisco–based The Hustle, as he described to me what sounded very Skimm-like in terms of growth potential and reader loyalty (and, indeed, The Hustle has taken ample inspiration from theSkimm, including an “ambassador” program that gives people rewards in return for referring friend, an idea that theSkimm pioneered).

In its first few months, The Continue reading "This email newsletter raised $300K from its (affluent, largely Silicon Valley–based) readers in 55 hours"