The number of Americans who get news from mobile has nearly tripled since 2013

The use of mobile phones for news now far outpaces the use of desktops and laptops for news — and that’s a big change over just the past two years, according to a factsheet released by the Pew Research Center on Tuesday. The above chart refers to Americans who “often” get news from mobile or desktop/laptop, but 96 percent of Americans ever get news “online” (i.e. from a mobile device or computer). Pew also offers up some other, not-super-surprising stats about who’s most likely to get news from mobile: young people, people of color, and Democrats (who also tend to be younger and less white). And “those with more formal education and higher incomes are more likely to get news on both mobile and desktop or laptop. Those with a college degree are more likely to often get news on mobile than those without a college degree (66 percent
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Amazon Prime Day is the bad-news-free news event we’ve been waiting for this summer

Amazon Prime Day. A day where clicking to refresh is fun, not panic-inducing. Where the only surprises are good ones. Where 3 p.m. marks not a one-hour warning until market close and news dumps, but JUST THE BEGINNING OF 36 HOURS OF AMAZING BARGAINS. It’s July 16 and instead of staring at The New York Times’ jittery election needle I’m staring at the Times-owned Wirecutter’s constantly updating Prime Day deals page. Outside, the Trump-Putin meeting continues and children remain separated from their parents and the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings are still coming. And European Amazon workers are striking, but inside I am ordering a budget portable hammock and ecologically sound beach toys and a Crayola 60th Anniversary 64 Count Crayon Set with Collectible Tin and Vitamin C serum and a berry keeper and a tiny car vacuum and who even knows what the rest of the day will bring,
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Facebook might downrank the most vile conspiracy theories. But it won’t take them down.

Through Social Science One, researchers can get access to Facebook data. Social Science One, launched Wednesday, is an independent research commission that will give social scientists access to previously private Facebook data. The initiative, announced back in April, is funded by outside organizations, and the research won’t be subject to Facebook’s approval. Robbie Gonzalez reported in Wired:
Starting today, researchers from around the world can apply for funding and data access that Social Science One will approve — not Facebook. If researchers want to search for something in the platform’s data that could make it look bad — or if they actually find something — Facebook won’t be able to pump the brakes.

Several people are typing: The good, the bad, and the mansplaining of WikiTribune

On June 30, a spam article was posted to WikiTribune, Jimmy Wales’ news startup that argued “news is broken and we can fix it.” “International Airport Escort service In Mumbai,” it read. “I Provide Good Quality Educated Profile At Very Low 100% Safe And Original. 100 % Satisfied Guaranteed (Age- 19-25) College Girls.” A contributor quickly flagged the post on WikiTribune’s public Slack and changed the page’s view to “private,” resulting in a 404 error for anyone who clicked on the link. The 404 page’s wording then became the topic of discussion. In the newsroom of the future, things are still being worked out. But everything is up for debate. WikiTribune was unveiled in April 2017 with big promises. A community of professional and citizen journalists would work side by side, reporting, fact-checking, combating fake news, and pulling in enough money from readers to support staff journalists
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“In 2018, coherence is bad journalism, bordering on malpractice.” Here’s how to do better (with some help from conflict mediators)

“The goal is not to wash away the conflict; it’s to help people wade in and out of the muck (and back in again) with their humanity intact.” In a report for Solutions Journalism Network, journalist Amanda Ripley writes about how reporters can work new techniques into their journalism — ones that are better equipped to deal with the “kind of divide America is currently experiencing,” which researchers call ‘intractible conflict.'” Ripley spent three months interviewing “people who know conflict intimately and have developed creative ways of navigating it” — “psychologists, mediators, lawyers, rabbis and other people who know how to disrupt toxic narratives and get people to reveal deeper truths.” A condensed version Continue reading "“In 2018, coherence is bad journalism, bordering on malpractice.” Here’s how to do better (with some help from conflict mediators)"

Americans may appreciate knowing when a news story is suspect, but more than a third will share that story anyway

“Each new election is a test.” The Washington Post’s Elizabeth Dwoskin took a peek at Facebook’s fact-checking efforts ahead of the Mexican election. (Another big problem in Mexico around the election: Fake news on WhatsApp.) In this case, the most problematic posts are not coming from outside the country but from within it. “The hardest part is where to draw the line between a legitimate political campaign and domestic information operations,” Facebook security executive Guy Rosen said. “It’s a balance we need to figure out how to strike.”
In a talk for security experts in May, Facebook security chief Alex Stamos called such domestic disinformation operations the “biggest growth category” for election-related threats that the company is confronting. These groups, he said, are copying Russian operatives’ tactics to “manipulate their own political sphere, often for the benefit of the ruling party.” This area is also the
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Slate’s Facebook traffic has dropped by 87 percent since 2017. (Anyone else wanna share numbers?)

American news organizations have been reluctant to share just how badly they’re doing on Facebook now. Anecdotal reports of decreased Facebook traffic trickled out through 2017; then, this past January, Facebook announced that it was drastically changing the News Feed to prioritize content from friends, family, and groups over content from brands like news publishers. Still, most publishers have publicly claimed they’re taking the changes in stride, eager for the opportunity to diversify their traffic sources — something they were already doing anyway, of course! Most of the stories we’ve heard about quitting Facebook after precipitous traffic drops have come from non-U.S. sites. Here, however, are some real American numbers, from Slate, which Slate’s Will Oremus reported Wednesday:
Slate — yes, the publication you’re reading right now — got more than 85 million clicks that originated from external sites and apps in January 2017 alone. Almost a third of
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