Now you can take a 24-hour Trump news “snooze” on the Quartz app

If you’ve started feeling panicky every day between 5 and 6 p.m. because the volume of Trump news and notifications are just too much, there is a solution for you in the Quartz iPhone app: The app was updated Tuesday to let users turn on a “24-hour political timeout” that will not show them any news or notifications about DJT for one full relaxing day. The offering comes at a time when the phones of news junkies — or even just people who have both The Washington Post and The New York Times’ apps installed on their phones — blow up regularly. (See: Nieman Lab staff, 5:45 p.m. during a recent solemn event.) Last week, Continue reading "Now you can take a 24-hour Trump news “snooze” on the Quartz app"

Scribd says it has over 500,000 subscribers paying $8.99/month for ebooks, audiobooks, and now news

Scribd’s $8.99/month subscription service started out with only ebooks. Over time, it’s expanded to audiobooks, sheet music, documents, magazines — and, as of Tuesday, newspapers. “Select articles” from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Guardian, as well as some archival content from the Financial Times, will now be available to Scribd subscribers. And Scribd says there are quite a lot of subscribers: The service now has over half a million paying subscribers, paying $8.99 a month, and the company is profitable. I was so surprised by the subscriber number that I asked CEO Trip Adler to repeat himself; it’s true, he said: “We have a $50 million revenue run rate.” The San Francisco–based company now has more than 110 employees. Newspaper content was a “natural addition” for Scribd, Adler said. The most popular forms of the content on the service are, in order, Continue reading "Scribd says it has over 500,000 subscribers paying $8.99/month for ebooks, audiobooks, and now news"

It’s too early to declare Facebook’s anti-fake news efforts a failure

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

“Fake Media Facebook will tell you this article is disputed.” One of the first times we saw a Fakebook fake news alert in the wild was around St. Patrick’s Day, for a debunked story on the “Irish slave trade.” (Better known as the Irish slaves myth.) The Guardian’s Sam Levin reported this week that Facebook’s “throttling” had the opposite effect: “A bunch of conservative groups grabbed this and said, ‘Hey, they are trying to silence this blog — share, share share,'” claimed Christian Winthrop, the editor of Newport Buzz, the site that published the article. It’s unclear how often this is happening. Facebook’s recognition of the Irish slave trade article, in particular, Continue reading "It’s too early to declare Facebook’s anti-fake news efforts a failure"

“Won’t work for exposure”: The financial nitty-gritty of commercial–nonprofit news partnerships

ProPublica and Vox.com announced this week that they’re hiring a joint video producer: “These types of collaborations are a comfortable, natural thing for our team to do,” Vox general manager Andrew Golis told Nieman Lab. And ProPublica has won three Pulitzers for collaborative reporting it’s done — this year, with the New York Daily News; in 2016, with The Marshall Project; and in 2010, with The New York Times Magazine. Such partnerships between nonprofits and commercial news organizations are becoming more common. At their best, they benefit both sides: The commercial publishers get expert reporting in specific areas that they don’t have time to devote resources to in their own newsrooms, while the nonprofits get extended reach for their work (and, hopefully, money, too). A report out Thursday from the American Press Institute, written by Jason Alcorn, looks at the ways in which they can be successful. Some Continue reading "“Won’t work for exposure”: The financial nitty-gritty of commercial–nonprofit news partnerships"

More European newspapers are charging for content online (but there are differences by country)

“A lot of people in the market are talking about paywalls or free traffic very much from an angle from what is right and what is wrong. Sometimes people think there is only one strategy: theirs,” Christian Röpke, the CEO of German newsweekly Die Zeit’s online presence Zeit Online, recently told my colleague Joseph Lichterman. As Zeit Online tries to attract a younger audience that might ultimately pay for its product, it’s trying a number of different strategies, from live events to new types of editorial content. Die Zeit just launched a new metered paywall in March, and it certainly isn’t alone: Though their strategies vary, European publishers are moving away from offering all of their content online for free, according to a factsheet released Wednesday by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. The factsheet looks at the different kinds of paid content (freemium, metered paywalls, hard paywalls)
Continue reading "More European newspapers are charging for content online (but there are differences by country)"

“The choice of 2 very unhappy headlines”: ASNE will focus on newsroom diversity, not jobs lost

“U.S. newspapers see more bad news, as jobs decline.” “Newspaper newsrooms suffer large staffing decreases.” “Newspaper industry lost 3,800 full-time editorial professionals in 2014.” The halving of America’s daily newsrooms.” Executives at the American Society of News Editors are sick of headlines like these being used to sum up ASNE’s annual newsroom diversity survey. It’s not that newsrooms aren’t losing jobs; they are. But the survey, launched more than 20 years ago, was never really intended to provide a quick snapshot of the general state of health of American newsrooms. It’s supposed to be a reflection of how newsrooms are doing at hiring women and people of color. And they are doing badly. “In many legacy news organizations, moving the needle on staff diversity took a back seat to the survival of the enterprise,” ASNE president Mizell Stewart III wrote this month. “Instead of a Continue reading "“The choice of 2 very unhappy headlines”: ASNE will focus on newsroom diversity, not jobs lost"

“The choice of 2 very unhappy headlines”: ASNE will focus on newsroom diversity, not jobs lost

“U.S. newspapers see more bad news, as jobs decline.” “Newspaper newsrooms suffer large staffing decreases.” “Newspaper industry lost 3,800 full-time editorial professionals in 2014.” The halving of America’s daily newsrooms.”

Executives at the American Society of News Editors are sick of headlines like these being used to sum up ASNE’s annual newsroom diversity survey. It’s not that newsrooms aren’t losing jobs; they are. But the survey, launched more than 20 years ago, was never really intended to provide a quick snapshot of the general state of health of American newsrooms. It’s supposed to be a reflection of how newsrooms are doing at hiring women and people of color. And they are doing badly.

“In many legacy news organizations, moving the needle on staff diversity took a back seat to the survival of the enterprise,” ASNE president Mizell Stewart III wrote this month. “Instead of a Continue reading ““The choice of 2 very unhappy headlines”: ASNE will focus on newsroom diversity, not jobs lost”