Chicas Poderosas is launching an accelerator in Latin America for digital news projects led by women

Over the past decade, Latin American news organizations have made some strides in introducing more women reporters into their newsrooms. In 2000, women made up 27 percent of the journalists working across newspapers, radio, and television in the region; in 2015, they represented 41 percent, according to the most recent report from the Global Media Monitoring Project. Slice the data other ways, though, and wider gaps resurface. More than half of male journalists were between the ages of 35 and 49, compared to 33 percent of female journalists, for instance (that’s flipped among younger journalists: 43 percent of female journalists were between the ages of 19 and 34, compared to 14 percent of male journalists). Such numbers offer a window into what newsroom leadership in Latin America still looks like. “And maybe you’ve seen, stories are shut down in newspapers because the government pressures; there’s censorship. Sometimes, people don’t publish Continue reading "Chicas Poderosas is launching an accelerator in Latin America for digital news projects led by women"

Facebook rules the Internet in the Philippines. Rappler walks the line between partnership and criticism

What’s it like to have a presidential election where misinformation on Facebook clouds what’s informing at least some voters’ decisions? The Philippines found out about half a year before the United States, according to Maria Ressa, CEO of the Philippines-based, social media-savvy news outlet Rappler. I chatted with Ressa the day before a tense session at the Global Editors Network conference last month in Vienna on the increasing reach and responsibility of platforms, during which Ressa shared the stage with the content lead from streaming platform Plex and the top spokesperson for Russia Today (here’s one exchange, if you’re curious). In a country where, for many, the Internet and Facebook are synonymous — as a result of the Free Basics program that offers free but limited internet access to smartphone users — riding the Facebook wave can lead to enormous audience growth for social media-savvy news organizations like
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People have trouble A) detecting faked images and B) identifying where they’ve been changed

I recently, shamefully fell for a photo plastered all over my timeline last week of Vladimir Putin sitting in a chair at G-20 as other world leaders, including Donald Trump, leaned in for what appeared to be an intense, whispered discussion. The photo was, as Gizmodo put it gently, totally fake. Fake headlines of the Pope-endorsing-Trump variety are just one part of the ecosystem of fakery online. There’s faked audio to worry about. Faked video. And of course, faked images. It turns out people aren’t very good at identifying manipulated images, according to new research published Tuesday in the journal Cognitive Research by researchers Sophie J. Nightingale, Kimberley A. Wade, and Derrick G. Watson from the University of Warwick. Participants were slightly better than random at picking out untouched versus Continue reading "People have trouble A) detecting faked images and B) identifying where they’ve been changed"

Henry Blodget: We’re “deeply underestimating how big digital media can be” in the next decade

Many of the digital news organization that used to be called startups have outgrown the term — they’re established players by now. Among that group: the Axel Springer-owned Business Insider, which is turning 10. (Its Silicon Alley Insider brand officially launched July 19, 2007, though the earliest posts were a couple months before.) The main site hit 50.8 million unique visitors this past May, according to comScore, up 15 percent from a year ago and placing it third behind Forbes Digital and Yahoo Finance in the business news sites category (Business Insider, like other sites with a distributed presence, disputes comScore measures as incomplete). Its research arm hit 7,500 subscribers the same month. And with a leg up from Axel Springer, especially in Europe, it continues to eye new countries for localized editions of BI. “The digital media industry is just now hitting its stride,” Business Insider Continue reading "Henry Blodget: We’re “deeply underestimating how big digital media can be” in the next decade"

The freedom-of-speech institute suing @realDonaldTrump to unblock his critics on Twitter has its eye on other lawsuits, too

The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University made waves last month when it threatened a First Amendment lawsuit on behalf of users blocked by @realDonaldTrump after criticizing him on Twitter, the U.S. president’s well-used, most-followed Twitter account (more than 33 million followers; official @POTUS has 19 million). In a letter addressed directly to President Donald J. Trump in early June, Institute director Jameel Jaffer and attorneys Katie Fallow and Alex Abdo had argued that blocking users who criticized or mocked Trump from accessing and engaging with his Twitter is actually unconstitutional, because @realDonaldTrump is used in such a way that it counts as a public forum under the First Amendment. Today, the Institute followed through, filing a suit in the Southern District of New York. (The official complaint is here; in addition to Trump, beleaguered press secretary Sean Spicer and White House social media director Dan Scavino
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Surprise! Democrats and Republicans are divided on the impact of the news media

Just checking in again: There’s still a big partisan divide in the U.S. over what kind of impact the media has on the country. 85 percent of those who identify as Republicans (as well as the Republican-leaning) think the news media has a “negative effect on the way things are going in the country,” according to a Pew Research study released Monday that looked at perceptions of several national institutions, including the news media, colleges and universities, churches, labor unions, and financial institutions. That’s about the same percentage of Republicans last year who thought the news media had a negative impact on the country’s direction, though that’s up from 68 percent in 2010. Democrats themselves are divided on their view of the news media’s impact on the country. But 44 percent see it as having a positive impact on the country, up from just 33 percent a year ago
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Trying to write a killer headline for social? Here are some of the most (and least) effective phrases

Jostling for readers for your listicle on Facebook? Aim for the number “10” in your headline. Trying to promote a story on Twitter? Emotion-based appeals popular on Facebook don’t translate to Twitter. Findings from a BuzzSumo trigram analysis of 100 million headlines published between March and May of this year confirms a lot about the clickbait-y, competitive publishing environment of social media. The analysis reveals nothing particularly surprising, for instance, about the headline phrases that generated the most likes, shares, and comments: “Will make you” was by far the most successful phrase, and emotion-based appeals like “melt your heart” and “make you cry” also do well. (Also, we reported that 10 was the most common number for a BuzzFeed list way back in 2013.) Publishers beware though: Facebook says its algorithm is cracking down again on clickbait in its News Feed. Phrases that performed poorly on Facebook? “Control
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