“You’re not doing it the way I did”: Public media in Europe gets creative with digital news

“Whenever you get the new generation, you get new language, and whenever you get new language you get people saying it’s not news because ‘you’re not doing it the way I did,'” said Mika Rahkonen, head of development at Finland’s national public broadcaster Yle. In January 2015, the broadcaster launched Kioski, which has evolved into a social video service that covers news and current affairs for younger audiences and publishes across Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, and WhatsApp. (Kioski also runs as a Thursday evening program on Finnish TV.) For this project, buy-in from a development department within Yle concerned specifically with facilitating the creation of news products was crucial, protecting the editorial team tasked with coming up with a “youth product” from any resistance to the product’s new voice. Buy-in from the wider newsroom was one critical factor in Kioski’s success, according to a new Reuters Continue reading "“You’re not doing it the way I did”: Public media in Europe gets creative with digital news"

The Bureau Local is stepping in to help U.K. local news outlets that want to do investigative reporting

The after-effects of national policies are often felt deeply on a local level. But with limited staff, local newsrooms can’t afford to spare a team to spend months cleaning and digging into complex data sets for a story. The Bureau Local wants to make sure those data stories are still found, and told. A project of the London-based nonprofit Bureau of Investigative Journalism, The Bureau Local officially launches today with the goal of building up a network of local journalists, data scientists, designers, and others around the U.K. who are interested in improving investigative and accountability reporting. It wants to help more local news outlets produce data-driven investigative journalism, and also be able to step in to offer support when local newsrooms hit a wall in their technical capacities. “We’re recognizing that those local newsrooms don’t have the resources to take on all this new information, and also
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The gender gap persists at many top news outlets in the U.S., and it’s reflected in how stories are reported

Far more men than women are reporting the news, at least at some of the most prominent news organizations in the United States. At ABC’s World News Tonight, 88 percent of the on-camera and producer credits on stories went to men. At the New York Daily News, 76 percent of bylines were men’s. Those are a few of the numbers from the Women’s Media Center 2017 study released Wednesday, which tracked reporting from broadcast, wire, newspaper, and digital-only outlets for three months in 2016. The study analyzed bylines, on-air anchor and correspondent appearances, and producer credits on 24,117 news pieces produced between September and November of last year by four broadcast TV outlets, 10 newspapers, four digital outlets, and two major wire services. Across all platforms, a gender gap persists, but the report found the starkest disparity in the TV news outlets it examined, where women — counting anchors
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Want a calmer place to discover and discuss The Washington Post’s reporting? Try this Facebook group

Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold started reporting on President Trump’s charitable donation promises last summer, crowdsourcing names of charities from his Twitter followers and painstakingly recording in public the list of charities he’s called in an attempt to find some that Trump actually donates to. Interest in his work has decidedly risen: Fahrenthold now has 345,000 followers on Twitter and regular gig on CNN. “When he first started, Dave’s work wasn’t getting the audience it’s now getting. It took a while for people to recognize what he was doing,” Terri Rupar, digital editor for the Washington Post’s national desk, said. To reach an even broader audience, “what if we could use a network that already exists, using some of that network he’s built up?”

As refugees resettle across Europe, four news organizations partner to tell the still-unfolding stories of integration

Across Europe, the migration story is still unfolding. Starting this month, four European news organizations — in Britain, France, Germany, and Spain — are partnering on an 18-month reporting project tracking individuals and families as they begin new lives in new home countries, as well as the communities that welcome them, amidst a rise of populist resentment. “A good journalist knows how to tell stories happening at a given time. But this story is evolving in a way none of us can predict,” said Serge Michel, reporter-at-large for the French newspaper Le Monde and editor of Le Monde Afrique, the paper’s edition covering Francophone Africa. “So if you follow a family and they integrate well into the city, it’s one story. If there are problems, it’s another story. We don’t know what will happen.” Le Monde is one of the four news organizations in The New Arrivals
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Hundreds of local reporters in New Jersey were laid off this past year. What does that mean for the state?

Last summer, a very hungry Gannett bought The Record, New Jersey’s second largest daily newspaper, as well as dozens of other community papers and magazines from the family-owned North Jersey Media Group. Last fall, it announced it would be cutting around half of North Jersey Media Group’s 426 jobs, letting go around 130 editorial staffers. Then this past January, it announced another 141 cuts. The impact these layoffs have on the local news ecosystem of New Jersey isn’t hard to imagine. Other news organizations serving New Jersey have also relentlessly cut staff. The New York Times, which serves parts of New Jersey, doesn’t have a beat reporter covering the state (“Look, I wish we had the resources to have what we used to have in New Jersey and Connecticut, but the reality is that we don’t,” executive editor Dean Baquet told the Times’s public editor in January.) How bad
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Readers seem willing to pay for news sites centered around a place. What about sites built on an issue?

To tote bag, or not to tote bag? For more and more news organizations, reader-supported — member-supported — journalism has taken on new urgency. And starting a membership program from scratch opens up a host of questions beyond deciding what nice-to-haves to give to the readers who are willing to open up their wallets for a news organization.

The criminal justice reporting nonprofit The Marshall Project is working through those questions as it begins trying to turn some of its readers into paying members. The Marshall Project is often described as a single-issue site, a designation that may gives an inadequate sense of the scope and depth of its coverage, but one that helps frame how it will build its own membership program.

“A membership program is, on one level, a fancy name for your low-level giving program — a way to conceive of and describe your smaller givers. Continue reading "Readers seem willing to pay for news sites centered around a place. What about sites built on an issue?"