Who’s really driving traffic to articles? Depends on the subject: Facebook (lifestyle, entertainment) or Google (tech, business, sports)

When you’re publishing to Facebook, or tweaking a headline to align with some carefully honed SEO strategy, how closely do you take note of story topic? New research from Parse.ly suggests that news organizations trying to make the most of Facebook referrals and Google search traffic need to be extra discerning about story topic, as some — like lifestyle or entertainment — see the majority of their referral traffic coming from Facebook, while others — like tech, sports, and business — see the lion’s share of their traffic coming through Google search. (The findings were based on Parse.ly’s analysis of more than 10 million articles published last year by outlets within its network.) Lifestyle articles, for instance, get more than 87 percent of their external traffic from Facebook, and just 7 percent from Google search. (63 percent of that traffic also came from a mobile device.)
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This contest is looking for more ideas on innovation ways to present factchecks (grand prize: $10,000)

If most fact-checking as it’s presented to readers today bores you, now’s your chance to figure out more exciting formats — and maybe win a big cash prize doing it. The International Center for Journalists is running a contest called TruthBuzz that seeks ideas to make fact-checking and debunking stories more appealing to readers, and to increase their chances of going viral. From the contest description:
We want your creative solutions for taking fact-checking beyond long-form explanations and bullet points. We’re looking for ideas — from everyone, not just journalists — that turn fact-checking into engaging, visual and interactive stories that are instantly understandable and shareable. A successful entry to TruthBuzz will refute or clarify a false or misleading report or statement in an engaging, entertaining way that convinces audiences of its veracity and encourages them to share it.
Any digital format in any language is welcome, from individuals or Continue reading "This contest is looking for more ideas on innovation ways to present factchecks (grand prize: $10,000)"

How NPR considers what new platforms — from smartwatches to fridges — will get its programming

Here is a (far from complete) list of places where you can listen to NPR programming: Your old school radio. Your car radio. Your smartphone. Your smartwatch. Your Amazon Echo. Your Google Home. Your refrigerator? If you own a Samsung Family Hub fridge (which features a giant screen on one of its doors), you can get a bulletin briefing of your calendar for the day, as well as an hourly news update, via NPR. (That’s in the United States. In Europe, the news partner is Upday; in Korea, it’s Kakao.) “Folks in the building have the same questions. I heard somebody talking about the fridge the other day — ‘Is that true, we’re on a fridge?’ I said, yeah,” Ha-Hoa Hamano, NPRs senior product manager, told me, amused at my excitement. (Full disclosure: I have an explicable obsession with this fridge thing, which we first Continue reading "How NPR considers what new platforms — from smartwatches to fridges — will get its programming"

The Associated Press is adding more user-generated social content (verified, of course) into its wire services

A new tool from the Associated Press will now allow users of its service to pull in topical and verified content shared by users on social media such as photos and videos around breaking news. Using the web interface provided by social media platform manager SAM (AP owns a stake in SAM and has been using it since 2015), AP Social Newswire lets AP clients look through social content that is being curated and vetted by AP editors in real-time.

From the AP:

View multiple feeds of content — from global to local — and monitor the vetting process in real-time through the notes and tags and that we apply to each asset (such as “authenticated” or “debunked”). All photos and videos are delivered in a digital-friendly format giving you the ability to seamlessly integrate UGC into your stories through embed codes.

In the realm of offering other news organizations

Continue reading “The Associated Press is adding more user-generated social content (verified, of course) into its wire services”

The Associated Press is adding user-generated social content (verified, of course) into its wire services

A new tool from the Associated Press will now allow users of its service to pull in topical and verified content shared by users on social media such as photos and videos around breaking news. Using the web interface provided by social media platform manager SAM (AP owns a stake in SAM and has been using it since 2015), AP Social Newswire lets AP clients look through social content that is being curated and vetted by AP editors in real-time. From the AP:
View multiple feeds of content — from global to local — and monitor the vetting process in real-time through the notes and tags and that we apply to each asset (such as “authenticated” or “debunked”). All photos and videos are delivered in a digital-friendly format giving you the ability to seamlessly integrate UGC into your stories through embed codes.
In the realm of offering other news organizations
Continue reading "The Associated Press is adding user-generated social content (verified, of course) into its wire services"

Investigative outlet Correctiv crowdsourced data collection with the help of a local newsroom

When the data you’re looking for to do your reporting doesn’t actually exist, consider collecting it yourselves — or, cast a wider net, and ask for help from those who live in the community whose issues you’re investigating. German investigative nonprofit CORRECT!V (henceforth, Correctiv) recently wrapped up an investigation meant to address such an absence of reliable, centralized government data that could be made available through a FOI request around class cancellations in schools in the Germany city of Dortmund (connected to a shortage of teachers). The crowdsourced investigation asked Dortmund residents — from parents to teachers to students themselves — to help enter information into its Crowd Newsroom platform on cancellation of classes in Dortmund schools over the course of March. More than 520 participated, resulting in 3,552 class cancellations logged on the platform. Registered users remained anonymous on the platform, but other users could see the reported Continue reading "Investigative outlet Correctiv crowdsourced data collection with the help of a local newsroom"

Investigative outlet Correctiv crowdsourced data collection with the help of a local newsroom

When the data you’re looking for to do your reporting doesn’t actually exist, consider collecting it yourselves — or, cast a wider net, and ask for help from those who live in the community whose issues you’re investigating.

German investigative nonprofit CORRECT!V (henceforth, Correctiv) recently wrapped up an investigation meant to address such an absence of reliable, centralized government data that could be made available through a FOI request around class cancellations in schools in the Germany city of Dortmund (connected to a shortage of teachers). The crowdsourced investigation asked Dortmund residents — from parents to teachers to students themselves — to help enter information into its Crowd Newsroom platform on cancellation of classes in Dortmund schools over the course of March. More than 520 participated, resulting in 3,552 class cancellations logged on the platform. Registered users remained anonymous on the platform, but other users could see the reported Continue reading “Investigative outlet Correctiv crowdsourced data collection with the help of a local newsroom”