Amazon Said to Make Sportswear Push in Industry-Jolting Move


Amazon.com Inc. is enlisting some of the biggest athletic-apparel suppliers as part of a foray into private-label sportswear, according to people familiar with the matter, setting the stage for further upheaval in an already-tumultuous industry. Makalot Industrial Co., a Taiwanese vendor that produces clothing for Gap Inc., Uniqlo and Kohl's Corp., is making apparel for the Amazon line, a person with knowledge of the arrangement said. Eclat Textile Co., another Taiwanese supplier, is contributing to the effort as well -- a relationship first noted by SinoPac Securities Corp. analyst Silvia Chiu. The project is new and long-term contracts haven't been signed yet, according to people involved. The manufacturers are producing small amounts of products for Amazon as part of a trial, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the effort isn't being promoted yet. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Samsung CEO Steps Down in ‘Unprecedented Crisis’


The chief executive officer of Samsung Electronics Co. is stepping down in a surprise resignation after decades at the company, saying the business needed new leadership following a bribery scandal that led to the imprisonment of its de facto chief. Kwon Oh-hyun, who also serves as co-vice chairman, announced his retirement on Friday as the Suwon-based company reported record operating income of $12.8 billion on booming demand for displays and memory chips. He said the company faces an "unprecedented crisis" despite the financial success. Kwon had emerged as the public face of Samsung Electronics after Jay Y. Lee, grandson of the company's founder, was detained on corruption charges and then sentenced to five years in prison in August amid a scandal that brought down South Korea's president. While the latest financial results show Samsung's business units operating smoothly, that in itself may present risks for Kwon, said Park Ju-gun, Continue reading "Samsung CEO Steps Down in ‘Unprecedented Crisis’"

Walmart’s Social-Media Chief Has 30 Times More Pinterest Followers Than Walmart


Walmart's social-media chief has 5 million Pinterest followers. Walmart has only 137,000, so she clearly sees room for improvement. And one of the brands she sees doing best there is rival Lowe's, she said in a talk Thursday at the Brandemonium conference in Cincinnati. Such conferences are full of show-and-tells from executives about their brands' own successes, but Walmart Senior Manager-Social Innovation Christine Martinez Loya focused mainly on what others are doing well, and her own largely pre-Walmart experience as Pinterest's user No. 8 which she became seven years ago thanks to an invitation from the founders at a conference for design bloggers. Loya was also frank about Walmart's challenges in social media, despite the company generating 5 million comments a year across platforms. "We do have a small challenge," she said, "which is changing Walmart's brand perception. No tiny endeavor. It's a massive one." Continue reading at AdAge.com

You Too, Pikachu? Pokmon Go Part of Russia Election Mess


Not even Pokmon Go was safe from Russian interference during the election. The blockbuster mobile game was used as a propaganda tool by Russian groups that were active on other social platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, according to a new CNN report. Here's how the augmented reality children's game got dragged into U.S. politics and how it was connected to the rest of the misinformation on social media: A group called "Don't Shoot Us" was started to promote racial justice issues such as standing against police brutality. The group established a presence on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and even Tumblr, where it encouraged people to join a Pokmon Go contest. The contest invited people to visit sites of police shootings, train the digital Pokmon creatures at those spots, and name their pet creatures in the augmented world after real-world victims of police. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Et Tu, Pikachu? Pokmon Go Part of Russia Election Mess


Not even Pokmon Go was safe from Russian interference during the election. The blockbuster mobile game was used as a propaganda tool by Russian groups that were active on other social platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, according to a new CNN report. Here's how the augmented reality children's game got dragged into U.S. politics and how it was connected to the rest of the misinformation on social media: A group called "Don't Shoot Us" was started to promote racial justice issues such as standing against police brutality. The group established a presence on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and even Tumblr, where it encouraged people to join a Pokmon Go contest. The contest invited people to visit sites of police shootings, train the digital Pokmon creatures at those spots, and name their pet creatures in the augmented world after real-world victims of police. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Et Tu, Pikachu? Pokemon Go Part of Russia Election Mess


Not even Pokmon Go was safe from Russian interference during the election. The blockbuster mobile game was used as a propaganda tool by Russian groups that were active on other social platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, according to a new CNN report. Here's how the augmented reality children's game got dragged into U.S. politics and how it was connected to the rest of the misinformation on social media: A group called "Don't Shoot Us" was started to promote racial justice issues such as standing against police brutality. The group established a presence on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and even Tumblr, where it encouraged people to join a Pokmon Go contest. The contest invited people to visit sites of police shootings, train the digital Pokmon creatures at those spots, and name their pet creatures in the augmented world after real-world victims of police. Continue reading at AdAge.com

Ad Groups Say Google Shouldn’t Play Judge and Jury for ‘Annoying’ Ads


Three of the biggest marketing trade bodies on Thursday sent an open letter to the Coalition for Better Ads essentially arguing that companies like Google shouldn't be judge, jury and executioner when it comes to blocking annoying ads. Google said in June that its Chrome browser will soon come preinstalled with technology to block unpopular ad formats. People familiar with the matter tell Ad Age that Google did not know the trade group's letter was coming when it did, suggesting that relations between the company and the rest of the industry are strained over the matter. The letter from the Interactive Advertising Bureau, the Association of National Advertisers and the American Association of Advertising Agencies says they are "united" in the effort to remove the ads now marring the online experience. But it adds that "unacceptable user experiences must be based on industry-wide self regulation, and not left to individual Continue reading "Ad Groups Say Google Shouldn’t Play Judge and Jury for ‘Annoying’ Ads"