In 2018, push alerts featured less yelling and more thinking


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


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More push alerts, less breaking news, less emoji: An analysis of 30 publishers’ mobile notifications shows that the infrastructure of alerts has stayed the same but newsroom managers are thinking differently about how to use them. In a follow-up study to a 2017 review, Columbia Journalism Review’s Pete Brown collected 1,510 mobile push alerts from 30 news apps over two weeks in June and July 2018, mirroring the previous procedure. 284 alerts alone came from President Trump’s family separation policy and border chaos in 2018, so Brown looked at those again in a case study. “This case study further confirms the ongoing shift away from using push purely for breaking news, a movement we had already observed last year. Notifications categorized as ‘analysis,’ ‘general,’ and ‘first-hand accounts’ comprised over a quarter of all alerts during the family separation controversy,” Brown wrote in his analysis. The weekly average for push
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Local news may not be getting a Trump bump


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


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The latest print issue of the Columbia Journalism Review focuses on local news. The publication is posting the articles online throughout May. Some digital tidbits: — As part of a survey of 420 journalists at small (circulation under 50,000) local newspapers across the country (written for Columbia’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism), Christopher Ali and Damian Radcliffe asked about the use of digital reporting tools like podcasts, augmented reality, and chat apps. Most of the journalists said they learn about these by reading about them (in places like Nieman Lab!) and teaching themselves. Eighty-four percent of respondents are using video reporting, 67 percent are using live video, and 25 percent were podcasting. — It can be challenging for small newspapers owned by chains with a one-size-fits-all digital strategy. One respondent said:
Our newspaper has fewer than 5,000 readers. Our personal challenge is that the owners treat all papers Continue reading "Local news may not be getting a Trump bump"

Texas Senate cites ‘decorum’ to increase distance between legislators, reporters


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    By Tamar Wilner Reporters in Texas have long enjoyed an unusual level of access to their state legislators. But when the legislative session started earlier this month, they became the latest statehouse journalists to find that access diminished in the name of order and propriety. And as the adversarial relationship between the Trump administration and the press intensifies, some Texas reporters argue a...

Headlines editors probably wish they could take back


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    By The Editors In this week's Lower Case... Meanwhile in Kildare...check out this hilarious headline from today's Leinster Leader ? pic.twitter.com/oaIqTiqF5j— Shane Beatty (@ShaneBeattyKFM) January 17, 2017  Although certainly not a funny story, the immature side of me had to laugh at the...

Behind the story: a peculiar true-crime tale by Michelle Dean


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    By Elon Green Reporter Michelle Dean and BuzzFeed editor Marisa Carroll were having drinks last July at Astoria’s Sparrow Tavern. Dean, a crime writer and literary critic, asked Carroll, her editor, if the 8,400-word story about a bizarre murder in Springfield, Missouri they’d been working on for months would actually find an audience or “if it was just a weird little thing that...

Weaponizations of mass destruction


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    By Merrill Perlman In the war of words between journalists and politicians, many new weapons are being deployed. But though language is being armed to the teeth, the only shots being fired are metaphorical. We’ll start with the obvious targets: Donald Trump “weaponized his own Twitter account during the campaign, using it to bash opponents and share his messages directly to his supporters,”...

Podcast: Avoiding Trump’s trap with ‘alternative facts’


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    By David Uberti Is the Trump Administration trying to bait aggressive reporters when it offers up "alternative facts"? What does a recent New York Times report tell us about the way its business model and editorial strategy are changing? How should journalists respond to charges of a media conspiracy?  We discuss that and more this week on The Kicker, where I'm joined by...

Five ways the media bungled the election


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    By Neal Gabler It didn’t take more than a few hours for President Trump to attack the press, and scarcely longer for his advisor, Kellyanne Conway, to introduce a novel concept: “alternative facts” in response to reporting that the crowd at the Trump inauguration fell below its predecessors. Thus has the battle between the media and the president been ignited. While news organizations...

Marketplace embarks on new endeavor to increase economic literacy


This post is by Columbia Journalism Review from Columbia Journalism Review


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    By Pete Vernon Donald Trump’s election revealed not only the depths of our political polarization, but also the public’s dwindling trust in media and the impact of economic anxiety on voters. In the wake of Trump’s inauguration, America’s most widely-heard business and financial news program is seeking to examine the disconnect between improving top-line numbers for the US economy and the feeling among...

The old-school journalism of Wayne Barrett


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    By Tom Robbins When New York investigative reporting legend Wayne Barrett died last week at the age of 71, he may have been the only practicing journalist in America who never owned a cell phone. For that matter, he didn’t become truly adept at using a computer until his last years at The Village Voice, where he logged a 37-year career, establishing himself...

Disseminator, Populist Mobilizer, or Contextualist: What type of journalist are you?


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    By Nicole Smith Dahmen At a time when news consumers are questioning traditional journalistic notions of balance and objectivity, research suggests the way journalists view their own work is evolving. Readers, too, are embracing that new ideology. For more than 40 years, the American Journalist surveys have periodically asked journalists what they thought were the most important aspects of their jobs. Researchers...

Trump’s disdain for the press has a silver lining


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    By Lee Siegel Trump attacking a journalist at his first news conference. The White House press secretary lying to the media at the first post-inauguration press briefing. Trump attacking the media in his speech to the CIA. None of it is surprising. Yet the result has been a mainstream media in a state of wounded pride and downright hysteria that I haven't...

Student journalists especially vulnerable to Trump’s press-as-enemy rhetoric


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    By Jonathan Peters If Trump were elected, what could he do to change US media law and/or restrict journalism practice? That was the question I sought to answer in an October CJR piece. I recounted the former reality TV star’s numerous threats to sue the press: The Washington Post, The Daily Beast, The New York Times, The Associated Press, and...