Weaponizations of mass destruction

    By Merrill Perlman In the war of words between journalists and politicians, many new weapons are being deployed. But though language is being armed to the teeth, the only shots being fired are metaphorical. We’ll start with the obvious targets: Donald Trump “weaponized his own Twitter account during the campaign, using it to bash opponents and share his messages directly to his supporters,”...

Podcast: Avoiding Trump’s trap with ‘alternative facts’

    By David Uberti Is the Trump Administration trying to bait aggressive reporters when it offers up "alternative facts"? What does a recent New York Times report tell us about the way its business model and editorial strategy are changing? How should journalists respond to charges of a media conspiracy?  We discuss that and more this week on The Kicker, where I'm joined by...

Five ways the media bungled the election

    By Neal Gabler It didn’t take more than a few hours for President Trump to attack the press, and scarcely longer for his advisor, Kellyanne Conway, to introduce a novel concept: “alternative facts” in response to reporting that the crowd at the Trump inauguration fell below its predecessors. Thus has the battle between the media and the president been ignited. While news organizations...

Marketplace embarks on new endeavor to increase economic literacy

    By Pete Vernon Donald Trump’s election revealed not only the depths of our political polarization, but also the public’s dwindling trust in media and the impact of economic anxiety on voters. In the wake of Trump’s inauguration, America’s most widely-heard business and financial news program is seeking to examine the disconnect between improving top-line numbers for the US economy and the feeling among...

The old-school journalism of Wayne Barrett

    By Tom Robbins When New York investigative reporting legend Wayne Barrett died last week at the age of 71, he may have been the only practicing journalist in America who never owned a cell phone. For that matter, he didn’t become truly adept at using a computer until his last years at The Village Voice, where he logged a 37-year career, establishing himself...

Disseminator, Populist Mobilizer, or Contextualist: What type of journalist are you?

    By Nicole Smith Dahmen At a time when news consumers are questioning traditional journalistic notions of balance and objectivity, research suggests the way journalists view their own work is evolving. Readers, too, are embracing that new ideology. For more than 40 years, the American Journalist surveys have periodically asked journalists what they thought were the most important aspects of their jobs. Researchers...