Sen. McCain Won’t Endorse Trump But Congratulates Him For Getting So Much Attention

The topic of much conversation today on the Sunday morning shows seemed to be getting the opinion of what conservative leaning guests think of a potential Donald Trump campaign for President. Reverend Franklin Graham seemed to like the idea, while New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg didn’t agree with Trump’s tactics. Somewhere in the middle is Republican Senator John McCain who when asked about the topic was eager to “stay out of it” completely.

McCain, appearing on Meet the Press, was reminded by host David Gregory that Trump had endorsed him in 2008. McCain didn’t want to comment on whether he likes Trump better or worse than any other potential Republican candidate, instead just saying “I think of Mr. Trump as having the time of his life. I congratulate him for getting all the attention that he’s getting.” Then McCain surprisingly even brought up Sarah Palin’s name unprovoked, adding “I would be very happy if Sarah Palin got in.”

Watch the clip from NBC below:

The Onion Fools The New York Times With Fake Obama Tiger Beat Cover

Today The New York Times admitted they made the mistake of treating a fake creation from The Onion as something legitimate. Last week the Times printed an article documenting the history of the squeaky-clean teen magazine Tiger Beat, and included a retrospective of past magazine covers. Unfortunately (or humorously depending on one’s perspective), in the collection they also included a parody cover created by The Onion, which featured President Obama.

The correction printed today in the Times:

A series of pictures last Sunday of covers of the magazine Tiger Beat, with an article about how the original teen-girl tabloid has remained virtually unchanged since its inception in 1965, erroneously included a parody cover, produced by the satiric newspaper The Onion, that featured a picture of President Obama.


(h/t)

CBS’ Bob Schieffer Is Not Happy! Scolds Congressional Guests For Taking Too Many Vacations

Face the Nation host Bob Schieffer couldn’t fathom why members of Congress get so much vacation time and voiced his frustration with Republican Senator Mark Kirk and Democratic Senator Chris Coons. Neither freshman senator was able to offer Schieffer an explanation that satisfied him, yet what perturbed him the most was that a bunch of Senators took a taxpayer-funded trip to Macau, the gambling capital of Asia.

Possibly angry that he had to work on Easter Sunday, Schieffer complained:

“Most of us – if you’re Jewish you get Passover off and if you’re Christian you get Good Friday off. But the Congress is taking two weeks off. President’s Day you took a week off. If I’m not mistaken, this is now five vacations since January that the Senate and the Congress have taken. Why?”

Kirk and Coons both agreed that they are frustrated with the slow pace of how the Senate works. Yet Schieffer’s point seems valid, maybe if the Senators were on vacation less often, then more might be able to be accomplished in the Senate quicker?

Watch the clip from CBS below:

Sen. Lindsey Graham: ‘Cut The Head Of The Snake Off,’ Start Bombing Gaddafi In Tripoli

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham appeared on State of the Union to discuss the apparent military stalemate in Libya between Gaddafi’s forces and the rebels. Graham acknowledged the mandate from the United Nations does not necessarily allow for more aggressive intervention by coalition forces, yet Graham firmly believed if more wasn’t done to aid the rebels soon then there would be no progress.

Graham’s recommendation to NATO and to the administration:

“Cut the head of the snake off, go to Tripoli, start bombing Gaddafi’s inner circle, their compounds, their military headquarters in Tripoli. The way to get Gaddafi to leave is to have his inner circle break and turn on him, and that’s going to take a sustained effort through an air campaign. . . . You cannot protect the Libyan people if Gaddafi stays. You cannot protect our vital national security interests if Gaddafi stays.”

Graham argued the quickest way to end this conflict was to get rid of Gaddafi and thought the “people around Gaddafi need to wake up every day wondering will this be my last.” Tough talk from the Senator, but Graham did not seem concerned that such aggression would be harmful since he thought if nothing more is done soon then many more lives will be lost.

Watch the clip from CNN below:

CNN’s Reliable Sources’ Skin-Deep Coverage Of The Wonkette/Trig Palin Story

For those wondering where the mainstream media is in covering the brouhaha over Wonkette’s birthday attack on Trig Palin (since deleted), CNN’s Reliable Sources answered the call Sunday morning. Host Howard Kurtz gave a quick recounting of the offensive post (and perhaps too much credit for an apology), and while the panel unequivocally disapproved, the discussion was disappointingly superficial.

Kurtz pulled a few choice quotes from the post, saying that Wonkette mocked 3 year-old Trig Palin as “retarded,” “somewhat alive,” and “perhaps not really Sarah Palin’s child,” then explains how the site initially stood by the post, but once advertisers began to desert the site in response to an online campaign, deleted the post and “apologized for poor comedic judgment.”

The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin said the Trig post showed “rotten taste,” and brought up the David Letterman joke that prompted outcry (and an angry response from Sarah Palin) a few years ago. She also observes the near-free ride that Andrew Sullivan has gotten on his pursuit of Trig Trutherism. Unfortunately, she failed to connect the dots between the Wonkette boycott, Sullivan’s objection to it, and the fact that he’s next on their list.

Clarence Page talked about the “normally delightful” comeuppance of Wonkette at the hands of their “lack of experience” in not knowing that you don’t go after the kids. Adweek’s Michael Wolff called Wonkette “tone deaf,” and throughout the segment, a chyron that said “Wonkette’s Low Blow: An apology for mocking Trig” appeared.

Cumulatively, the effect was a failure to convey the true character of the Wonkette post, which was “tone deaf” in the way that a punch in the balls is “impolite,” and the apology, which was of debatable sincerity and completeness.

The segment was also disappointing because it didn’t ask any of the deeper questions that this story begs. Chief among them is the power of the Twitter boycott, and the question of whether such boycotts are necessarily a good thing. While it’s not surprising that Andrew Sullivan has reservations, so do some who support the boycotters in spirit.

Additionally, while comparing this episode with others where politicians’ children were insulted, it would have been natural to discuss the ways in which this attack crossed lines that the others didn’t. Finally, with advertising expert Wolff on hand, why not delve into the practical consequences of a #TrigsCrew-style boycott?

In any case, Kurtz deserves credit for covering a story that isn’t getting the attention it deserves, but is right in Kurtz’s wheelhouse. It would have been nice if he had gotten a little more distance on his swing.

Here’s the segment, from CNN’s Reliable Sources:


CNN’s Reliable Sources’ Skin-Deep Coverage Of The Wonkette/Trig Palin Story

For those wondering where the mainstream media is in covering the brouhaha over Wonkette’s birthday attack on Trig Palin (since deleted), CNN’s Reliable Sources answered the call Sunday morning. Host Howard Kurtz gave a quick recounting of the offensive post (and perhaps too much credit for an apology), and while the panel unequivocally disapproved, the discussion was disappointingly superficial.

Kurtz pulled a few choice quotes from the post, saying that Wonkette mocked 3 year-old Trig Palin as “retarded,” “somewhat alive,” and “perhaps not really Sarah Palin’s child,” then explains how the site initially stood by the post, but once advertisers began to desert the site in response to an online campaign, deleted the post and “apologized for poor comedic judgment.”

The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin said the Trig post showed “rotten taste,” and brought up the David Letterman joke that prompted outcry (and an angry response from Sarah Palin) a few years ago. She also observes the near-free ride that Andrew Sullivan has gotten on his pursuit of Trig Trutherism. Unfortunately, she failed to connect the dots between the Wonkette boycott, Sullivan’s objection to it, and the fact that he’s next on their list.

Clarence Page talked about the “normally delightful” comeuppance of Wonkette at the hands of their “lack of experience” in not knowing that you don’t go after the kids. Adweek’s Michael Wolff called Wonkette “tone deaf,” and throughout the segment, a chyron that said “Wonkette’s Low Blow: An apology for mocking Trig” appeared.

Cumulatively, the effect was a failure to convey the true character of the Wonkette post, which was “tone deaf” in the way that a punch in the balls is “impolite,” and the apology, which was of debatable sincerity and completeness.

The segment was also disappointing because it didn’t ask any of the deeper questions that this story begs. Chief among them is the power of the Twitter boycott, and the question of whether such boycotts are necessarily a good thing. While it’s not surprising that Andrew Sullivan has reservations, so do some who support the boycotters in spirit.

Additionally, while comparing this episode with others where politicians’ children were insulted, it would have been natural to discuss the ways in which this attack crossed lines that the others didn’t. Finally, with advertising expert Wolff on hand, why not delve into the practical consequences of a #TrigsCrew-style boycott?

In any case, Kurtz deserves credit for covering a story that isn’t getting the attention it deserves, but is right in Kurtz’s wheelhouse. It would have been nice if he had gotten a little more distance on his swing.

Here’s the segment, from CNN’s Reliable Sources:


Charlie Sheen Tells Live Audience ‘Why You Shouldn’t’ Vote For Donald Trump

Donald Trump has been on the offensive as of late complaining about President Obama and his policies, yet now celebrities are on the attack. First it was Jerry Seinfeld expressing his disapproval of Trump’s political rhetoric, and now Charlie Sheen has put Trump in the crosshairs of his “Violent Torpedo of Truth.” Our sister site GossipCop is reporting that a pair of cufflinks Trump gave to Sheen are the source of Sheen’s anger.

During his live show at the BankAtlantic Center in Sunrise, Florida, Sheen revealed that Trump once gave Sheen what Trump claimed were platinum-and-diamond Harry Winston cufflinks worth $100,000. Sheen’s story that followed, according to GossipCop:

Sheen recalled the appraiser took a look at the platinum-and-diamond cufflinks and told him they weren’t platinum, they were “f’n tin,” and the diamonds were zirconias. Sheen claimed the appraiser put Trump’s supposedly generous gift at “maybe worth $60.”

Trump never likes when someone disputes the value of anything associated with him, so it’s likely Trump won’t resist the opportunity to respond. And with Sheen as the target, Trump is likely to have a field day.