Bill O’Reilly Participates In Top Two Cable News Shows Tuesday

Cable news ratings, February 2, 2010: Check out the highlights, and see the full ratings below:

Glenn Beck’s 5pmET FNC program was #2 on all of cable news, behind Bill O’Reilly’s 8pmET program, in total viewers and the A25-54 demographic on Monday. It was a…memorable show, as O’Reilly stopped by for his first visit.

• The top non-FNC show in the A25-54 demo was Keith Olbermann at 8pmET for MSNBC, as well as in total viewers.

Check out all the ratings below, and leave your own thoughts in the comments:

TV NEWS RATINGS: 25-54 DEMOGRAPHIC (L +SD)
Fox News CNN MSNBC CNN Headline News
5 pm

Beck

729

Blitzer

101

Matthews

85

Prime

85

6 pm

Baier

517

Blitzer

132

Ed Show

93

Prime

105

7 pm

Shep

463

Blitzer

204

Matthews

120

Issues

152

8 pm

O’Reilly

895

Brown

173

Olbermann

261

Grace

219

9 pm

Hannity

610

King

183

Maddow

219

Behar

173

10 pm

Greta

570

Cooper

187

Olbermann

133

Grace

227

11 pm

O’Reilly

445

Cooper

80

Maddow

146

Showbiz

157

TOTAL DAY 424 133 109 148
PRIME TIME 693 181 204 203
Data by Nielsen Media Research. Live and same day (DVR) data.
TV NEWS RATINGS: TOTAL VIEWERS (L +SD)
Fox News CNN MSNBC CNN Headline News
5 pm

Beck

2945

Blitzer

549

Matthews

517

Prime

190

6 pm

Baier

2581

Blitzer

469

Ed Show

496

Prime

224

7 pm

Shep

2088

Blitzer

589

Matthews

589

Issues

434

8 pm

O’Reilly

3597

Brown

470

Olbermann

950

Grace

654

9 pm

Hannity

2763

King

759

Maddow

892

Behar

709

10 pm

Greta

2239

Cooper

610

Olbermann

470

Grace

481

11 pm

O’Reilly

1701

Cooper

399

Maddow

349

Showbiz

309

TOTAL DAY 1684 469 420 323
PRIME TIME 2868 613 772 607
Data by Nielsen Media Research. Live and same day (DVR) data.


NewBizNews: What ad sales people hear

Recently, at CUNY, we held a roundtable for ad sales people from hyperlocal blogs to big newspapers to hear what they are hearing from local merchants. We’re wrapping up our research for the New Business Models for News Project — indeed, it was Alberto Ibargüen, head of the Knight Foundation that funded this work, who said he really wanted to hear sales people’s perspective — and beginning research for Carnegie-funded work on new ad models, products, service, and sales methods, working with The New York Times on The Local. Some of what we learned; the first four are the most important to me:

* Most important, I think, is that we won’t be selling media to merchants — banners ‘n’ buttons — so much as we will be selling service: helping them with all their digital needs, including optimizing them in Google and Yelp and social media and mobile. I’ll write a post with more thoughts on this shortly.

* Voice matters. Local bloggers said they are must-reads because of their voice in the community (the human voice of the neighbor over the cold voice of the institution) and that — along with a constant flow of posts and news and the audience and conversation that attracts — makes them must-buys for advertisers. One blogger made the newspapers visibly jealous reporting that advertisers are coming to the blog asking to advertise because they had to be there. Another way to look at this: The service must be part of the community. One of the bloggers covers new businesses in town because that’s news; ads may follow but even if they don’t, the site will cover commerce in the community.

* There is interest in network sales. One newspaper exec in the room said she’s jealous of the new advertisers smaller bloggers get and would be interesting in having those bloggers sell into her site. The blogger is also interested in getting revenue from larger advertisers via the newspaper’s sales. That networked approach is key to the optimization of value we projected in our new business models for the local news ecosystem: the advertiser can be better served by appearing in more services with easier purchase; the large site can get new customers it could not otherwise afford to sell; the small site can get large advertisers it could not otherwise attract; all ships rise on this tide. (However, we must find a new word instead of “network,” as it has low-value cooties associated with it. Alliance? Ecosystem? Suggestions?)

* We at CUNY are going to be investigating the possibilities for citizen sales — new sales forces and new sales businesses that can sprout up alongside and help support the new news businesses. The group saw potential here but also saw the need for training and quality control.

* It’s clear that local merchants still need education. In the early days of the web, we had to sell advertisers not just on the value of our sites but on the value of the internet itself. That effort continues with smaller advertisers. That means that there’s a greater cost of sales. It also means that this is a means of sales — come to our internet seminar (a technique that is working for various of the participants). And I see a role here for organizations such as universities (not to mention chambers of commerce) to help local merchants understand the value of the internet.

* Local ad agencies also need education still.

* There was some debate about the sophistication of local advertisers and their need for data, but it’s clear that in many cases, media have to collect, analyze, and present data on performance and return on investment. One of the more established companies said all that matters to small advertisers is ROI (return on investment: feet to the door and ringing cash registers). One of the newer companies said more data is needed to prove performance and value. In some cases, we will measure will be attention, in others leads produced, in others sales, and in others more intangible measurements about community and relationships. At our conference on new business models for news in the fall, Gannett talked about research it did with Ideo that found that very local merchants need discovery (read: search) but in many cases, their customers already now they’re there; so what they seek is better relationships with their communities; how do we deliver and measure that?

* The simpler the better. Local merchants are not buying CPM-based advertising. They’re buying timed sponsorships. They want to see the ad they bought on the site.

* Google is playing a bigger and bigger role in local (via the web and now mobile). Some local merchants don’t bother having a site; their ads link to their Google place page.

* One old law of sales is still true: get one butcher advertising and that helps force the next one to join in.

* Self-serve platforms for buying advertising are not the answer. Sales is still needed. I’ve heard that in more than one horror story about low revenue from build-it-and-they-will-come efforts. Once an advertiser is sold, I’ve also heard of success in enabling them to update their ads (e.g., providing them with advertiser blogs).

* Replicating print ads online doesn’t work for advertisers or readers. No surprise there; the only surprise is that publications and merchants still try.

* There are other products besides advertising to sell: email, events, coupons (which work well for many local sites). There was some debate in the group about the value of video as a vehicle for advertising and as a form of advertising itself. More experimentation is needed.

At CUNY, our next step will be performing research with local advertisers/merchants. Then we’ll work on R&D on new ad forms. Then we’ll try to train citizen sales forces. This is the next step in our work on new business models and sustainability for news. Stay tuned.

: LATER: In the comments on this post at Buzzmachine, Dave Chase of SunValleyOnline adds great notes:

Great observations and consistent with what I have heard/seen from working with lots of local advertisers at SunValleyOnline which is one of the sites talked about in the CUNY “census” you guys did that has managed to build a reasonable (and profitable business). I generally agree with what you’ve laid out but will amplify or differ with a few items.

1. Education: Hands down the biggest need I’ve seen. Sales people need it. Merchants need it. Local agencies/marketing consultants need it. Citizen ad sales will really need it. It’s the reason I collaborated with a former colleague to create a how-to resource for local merchants on marketing in the digital age that I’m making available to the ventures I’m involved with. I believe there’s scalable ways for local sites to tap into this without having to do all the training themselves that can also serve as lead generation.

2. Tools for advertisers to manage their own ads: Despite having two tools (Impact Engine and Mixpo) that have very easy interfaces and through much encouragement, virtually no advertiser is taking advantage of it. They simply want us to take care of it. The advertisers I’ve worked with aren’t sophisticated at all from a marketing perspective.

3. VideoAds: This is primarily a function of the size of advertiser you are going after and where they’ve advertised. Generally, it’s the bigger advertiser who has run TV ads before that will be candidates to move $$. Turns out one of the categories where $$ are finally starting to move is political ads. The recent Supreme Court decision will accelerate that. Dynamically built videoads is a particularly promising area and is something that took place in the recent Massachusetts Senate race (on the winning side). There’s some powerful tools that allow A-B testing, message optimization, etc. that are accessible even to the smallest advertiser.

Senate Democrats Greet Scott Brown with Mixed Reception of Warmth, Panic

Al Franken is not entirely comfortable with this whole “Senator Scott Brown” thing. The newly seated Massachusetts Republican is being partially blamed for a heated discussion between Franken and senior White House advisor David Axelrod during a Senate Democrats meeting, where the senator attacked Axelrod for the lack of direction, specificity, and initiative the Obama administration has taken on health care reform in the wake of the party losing their supermajority in the chamber.

According to a Democratic source reporting to Politico, Franken’s outrage “was all about leadership and health care and what the plan was going to be,” or, more specifically, that there didn’t seem to be a plan in place at all for the reform. Relying on the current Senate leadership to come up with something substantive that would receive bipartisan support led to a bill that united both parties only in their frustration with it– the Republicans with its reforms and earmarks designed to “buy off” moderate Democrats and the Democrats with its concessions in reforming the health care reform system designed to do the same. And this was when the Democrats were immune from filibustering. As the Politico team put it, “Democratic senators are frustrated that the White House hasn’t done more to win over the public on health care reform and other aspects of its ambitious agenda — and angry that, in the wake of Scott Brown’s win in the Massachusetts Senate race, the White House hasn’t done more to chart a course for getting a health care bill to the president’s desk.” The combination of Brown unlocking that door and the Obama administration’s consistency in abstract, soft-spoken strategy was apparently concerning to many Democratic senators, with Franken taking his frustration with the lack of direction much further than his colleagues.

This fear of the “41-seat majority” does not seem to have spread to the Democratic leadership in the Senate, however. DSCC Chair Robert Menendez commented that siding with the Democrats on a jobs bill would be “to his benefit” should Brown choose to given the current polling numbers of the importance of job creation to Massachusetts voters. Politico also reports Brown got a standing ovation from the nine Democrats attending his swearing-in ceremony last night. It appears the people in charge hope Brown will live up to the Massachusetts part of his identity than the Republican one.

Brown has helped convince them that he’s not exactly going to be James Inhofe out there, commenting that he’s “always been a big tent person” and that he is willing to work in a bipartisan way. Some would argue he has little wiggle room to act otherwise. He is, of his own admission, fairly socially liberal, and while he is a Republican, he still represents the most liberal constituency in the nation. He has another campaign to win in six years, and whether the Tea Party movement that helped get him to Washington will still be in full swing by then– and whether the Democrats will pitch as uninformed a candidate as Martha Coakley again– is anyone’s guess. On the other hand, the simple act of being elected as a Republican candidate gives him a mandate to be a thorn in the side of Democrats on almost any issue that comes to the floor. This is especially true of the biggest issue on his campaign platform: health care reform, the issue Senator Franken is so incensed about. There is little doubt in anyone’s mind Brown will vote in favor of the current reform, so perhaps Franken’s fears are justified. That doesn’t mean he is not open to voting for a new bill with fewer (or less obvious) pork amendments and a bit more concrete reform. For now Democratic leaders are hoping to soften Brown up with other business in the hope that he will becoming a regular ally in enacting the matters on their agenda.


FNC Tops CNN, MSNBC, HLN Combined Monday In All Categories

Cable news ratings, February 1, 2010: Check out the highlights, and see the full ratings below:

• Fox News was the top-rated cable news network by far on Monday, ahead of CNN, MSNBC and HLN combined in total viewers and the A25-54 demographic, in total day and prime time. Bill O’Reilly had the top show, Glenn Beck was #2.

• The top non-FNC show was Keith Olbermann’s 8pmET MSNBC show – the only program with more than one million total viewers on Monday.

Check out all the ratings below, and leave your own thoughts in the comments:

TV NEWS RATINGS: 25-54 DEMOGRAPHIC (L +SD)
Fox News CNN MSNBC CNN Headline News
5 pm Beck

749

Blitzer

91

Matthews

109

Prime

85

6 pm Baier

533

Blitzer

156

Ed Show

126

Prime

119

7 pm Shep

612

Blitzer

168

Matthews

143

Issues

168

8 pm O’Reilly

1062

Brown

146

Olbermann

286

Grace

230

9 pm Hannity

682

King

172

Maddow

249

Behar

158

10 pm Greta

487

Cooper

154

Olbermann

213

Grace

238

11 pm O’Reilly

432

Cooper

106

Maddow

147

Showbiz

239

TOTAL DAY 442 124 120 160
PRIME TIME 745 157 249 205
Data by Nielsen Media Research. Live and same day (DVR) data.
TV NEWS RATINGS: TOTAL VIEWERS (L +SD)
Fox News CNN MSNBC CNN Headline News
5 pm Beck

3069

Blitzer

500

Matthews

524

Prime

218

6 pm Baier

2690

Blitzer

577

Ed Show

471

Prime

280

7 pm Shep

2314

Blitzer

596

Matthews

560

Issues

399

8 pm O’Reilly

3861

Brown

531

Olbermann

1043

Grace

731

9 pm Hannity

2660

King

623

Maddow

836

Behar

691

10 pm Greta

2112

Cooper

610

Olbermann

628

Grace

497

11 pm O’Reilly

1496

Cooper

341

Maddow

403

Showbiz

415

TOTAL DAY 1730 511 404 362
PRIME TIME 2879 588 837 631
Data by Nielsen Media Research. Live and same day (DVR) data.


Media Matters Highlights Tancredo’s Anti-Obama Screed, Ignores McCain Bashing

File this in under “selective reporting.” Media Matters breathlessly reported how Rep. Tom Tancredo opened the Tea Party Convention in Nashville yesterday with remarkably harsh words for both the American electorate and President Obama. What they neglected to report was that he also shared similarly harsh words for GOP nominee John McCain.

In light of the criticism Media Matters frequently directs towards Fox News for it’s “unbalanced coverage”, it’s particularly interesting that they only highlight this part of Tancredo’s rant, perhaps because his solely railing against Obama better fits the binary narrative some love to promote.

While Tancredo’s inflammatory words were likely designed to get this sort of attention, at least his speech was somewhat bipartisan in its vitriol. Making “matters” worse – the story was picked up by Huffington Post, who reported only part of the comments:

Former Congressman and 2008 Republican presidential candidate Tom Tancredo told an audience on Thursday at the Tea Party Convention in Nashville that “people who could not even spell the word ‘vote’, or say it in English, put a committed socialist ideologue in the White House.”

“His name,” Tancredo said, “is Barack Hussein Obama.”

Tancredo delivered the opening keynote speech at the convention where several hundred Tea Party conservatives have gathered.

“So the race for America is on right now. The president and his left-wing allies in Congress are going to look at every opportunity to destroy the Constitution before we have a chance to save it,” Tancredo told the delegates. “So put your running shoes on. Because I’ll tell you, I’ve heard we need a revolution. My friends, we already had it. We lost. I mean, what happened to us in that last election was a revolution.”

Just after these comments, Tancredo then launched into a rant against McCain and the GOP establishment:

If McCain had been elected, Neo-Cons would be writing flattering editorials in a Weekly Standard and Wall Street Journal. Congressman Gutierrez & President McCain would have been posing in a Rose Garden with big smiles as ay received accolades from La Raza for having finally passed an amnesty. President Calderone and President McCain would be toasting the elimination of those pesky things called borders, and major steps would have been taken toward the creation of a North American union.

If McCain had been elected, Sarah Palin would not be free to tell it like it is. The Republican congress would never be voting in 100% opposition to left-leaning legislation as they are today. There would be no Republican in Ted Kennedy’s seat in Massachusetts.

If McCain had been elected, America would be moving down the same collectivist path, and there would have been no Tea Party, no 9/12ers, no rally for America on the Washington Mall and we would not be here.

To truly appreciate the effect of the selective edits, one need first watch the Media Matters clip below:



Now view the clip of Tancredo speaking as it aired on CNN (note – the jump cut in the middle was done by CNN editors.)


Is The NYT About To Go All ‘Spitzer’ On Gov. David Paterson?

Apparently the New York Times is working on some big shocking story about Gov. David Paterson. Or if the rumors are to be believed, about Gov. Paterson’s sex life. All things considered, namely what we already know about Paterson, the low expectations even the most starry-eyed among us must at this point have for anything having to do with Albany, and the general state of the personal lives of our politicos at the moment, one shudders at the thought of what currently qualifies as shocking. Or whether New York is even shockable any more. Anyway, the details thus far:

The Daily News’ Elizabeth Benjamin (if you’re not already reading her you should be) posted this earlier today:

The rumor mill has been running overtime in recent weeks about Paterson and the possibility that a major newspaper is about to drop a bombshell story about his personal life that will be far worse than his acknowledged extramarital affair with a former state employee. Pretty much the whole political world has been buzzing about this. But so far, nothing has come of it.

And earlier today the New York Observer’s John Koblin twittered this out:

“Anyone hearing about NYT bombshell on Paterson? Heard big, damaging story comin. been working for weeks, but still not published yet.”

Gawker thinks the story is that the Gov. and his wife are swingers. Which I am skeptical about only in so far is that being a “bombshell” and/or a story the NYT would devote their investigative reporters to; last time I checked swinging was salacious but not illegal. Not sure if that was, or still is, a qualifier for NYT investigations. I guess we’ll find out.