‘Trust in News’ Study Shows More Trust for Print Publications Than Digital

Trust is the topic that won’t go away. On either side of the pond, leaders with very different temperaments are dealing with issues of declining trust in very different ways. Whatever their differences, however, the knock-on effect to mainstream media — tacitly held responsible for failing to fully represent shifting public sentiment when they aren’t being openly lambasted — has been profound. Or has it? A new global research study from Kantar entitled “Trust in News” has lifted the lid on attitudes to news media among 8,000 news consumers in the U.S., U.K., France and Brazil. Key findings of the study include:

When a Facebook test moves news stories to a separate feed, traffic — and public discourse — are at stake

It’s Facebook’s world; we just live in it. Facebook recently launched a test — and tests, for the platform over the years, are a dime a dozen — of a new and separate feed outside the main News Feed all its users see when they log on. Called Explore and marked with a rocketship icon, the section was the new home for a mix of posts from Facebook pages — meaning public figures, brands, and of course, news organizations found what they published to Facebook exiled there. This particular test, according to Facebook, is taking place only in Bolivia, Cambodia, Guatemala, Serbia, Slovakia, and Sri Lanka. The Want to get back into the regular feed? Facebook would be happy to let you — if you buy an ad. (Earlier iterations of Explore have been tested since this spring and originally focused on content from pages users hadn’t explicitly liked Continue reading "When a Facebook test moves news stories to a separate feed, traffic — and public discourse — are at stake"

This Strategically Placed Logo Drove Fans Absolutely Batty During the World Series

Check out the clip above from Tuesday night’s Game 1 of the World Series. Oh, sorry. Did we say clip? We meant, check out the photo that looks for all the world like it’s a video clip but it’s actually not because YouTube apparently wants to torture us all. Give YouTube credit for this one. The Internet video behemoth placed an ad behind home plate through much of the game featuring their signature red and white play button. When a right-handed batter was in the box, that play button appeared to be right in the middle of the screen — in a spot where one would normally click on it. The ad placement was equal parts brilliant and diabolical. And it drove fans batty watching at home. Here’s a small sampling of the reaction from Twitter:

Newsonomics: Can startup Invisibly be the new revenue stream publishers dream of?

Oh no, can it be another news micropayments play? With the seemingly sudden sense that there have got to be ways other than a full-bore subscription for readers to help pay the freighted costs of producing news, 2018 will bring multiple bold new efforts to revive the news business. Now you can add a new venture, Invisibly, to that list. But its ambitions are far bigger than just micropayments — or just the news business. Jim McKelvey, the cofounder of Square, spearheads and funds Invisibly. He’s spent almost a year and a half talking to media brands big and small, entertainment and news. And he’s talking about a venture he says could generate a billion dollars a month in new revenue largely for those companies. Already, I’m told, “hundreds” of titles, including newspapers, magazines, and other media, have signed up to test Invisibly, which joins joins Scroll,
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Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)

“It feels to me as though America is becoming more European,” said Emily Bell, director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism. “It’s saying the not-for-profit sector has a real place in publishing, not just a sort of patch to get from here to the next profitable model. And then it’s asking, please, Europe, help us with the regulation.” This was in the middle of a free-wheeling discussion at Harvard Business School Friday, “The Future of Advertising and Publishing: Finding New Revenue Models for Journalism in the Digital Age.” The afternoon’s first panel was moderated by Bell and brought together Kinsey Wilson, digital strategist at The New York Times; David Carroll, associate professor of media design at The New School’s Parsons School of Design; and Nicco Mele, director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, for Continue reading "Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)"

Newsonomics: Nine midsummer lessons from a unique moment in press, and American, history

This hardly seems like a beachy, devil-may-care summer. Among fears of North Korean missiles, new Russian menace, and a highly unpredictable Administration, we are a nervous people. For the news media, it’s been a year of two tales. Never has the press been so pilloried, relentlessly, from on-high. Never, as well, has the value of never-say-die enterprising reporting proven so effective at filling in facts and truths amid campaigns of misdirection and almost-comical prevarication. Let’s step back for a midsummer break, considering 9 lessons we may take away from this unique moment in press, and American, history. Readers are the future of paying for high-quality journalism. Exhibit A: The New York Times. This year, the Times crossed into milestone territory. Now more than sixty percent of all the Times’ revenue comes from its readers, almost double the percentage it was in the good old days of bountiful print advertising. Continue reading "Newsonomics: Nine midsummer lessons from a unique moment in press, and American, history"

Sell Ads On Engaged Time Metrics? Publishers Still Weighing Promise And Risk

A few days ago, a report in Axios caught my eye: big advertisers, frustrated with the digital advertising process, are shifting their digital ad dollars to TV — and even radio and billboard ads are in play. It was a pointed reminder that despite growth in overall digital ad spending projected at billions of dollars per year, not all is well in the marketplace. Advertisers are concerned by an opaque supply chain, low viewability and high levels of fraud. Publishers are stuck competing with Facebook and Google in an ad economy based on selling impressions, which by definition rewards scale over quality. Professionals on both sides of the equation are looking for better ways to buy and sell ads.

Brent Merritt

One intriguing alternative to the status quo is selling display ads based on time. In this approach, publishers use attention currencies such as cost-per-hour to sell big blocks of
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