MediaShift Podcast #226: Google Fights Ad Boycott in U.K.; Alt-Right Sites in Turmoil; CJR’s Kyle Pope

In the news this week, Google has been subject to an advertising boycott in the U.K. by various brands who don’t want to be seen next to extremist videos on YouTube. The tech giant announced better controls for advertisers in a bid to win them back. Turmoil hits alt-right news sites, as the FBI investigates their connection to Russian hackers during the election, and three staffers are suspended by the Independent Journal Review, and one resigns, for spreading fake news. A new study shows that who shares a story on social media affects trustworthiness more than which news outlet published the story. Our Metric of the Week is Chatbot Metrics, and we’re joined by Kyle Pope, the feisty new publisher and editor-in-chief at the Columbia Journalism Review. Don’t have a lot of time to spare, but still want to get a roundup of the week’s top news? Then check
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Quality over crap

We keep looking at the problems of fake news and crap content — and the advertising that feeds them — through the wrong end of the periscope, staring down into the depths in search of sludge when we could be looking up, gathering quality.

There is a big business opportunity to be had right now in setting definitions and standards for and creating premium networks of quality.

In the last week, the Guardian, ad agency Havas, the UK government, the BBC, and now AT&T pulled their advertising from Google and YouTube, complaining about placement next to garbage: racist, terrorist, fake, and otherwise “inappropriate” and “offensive” content. Google was summoned to meet UK ministers under the threat they’ll exercise their European regulatory reflex.

Google responded quickly, promising to raise its standards regarding “hateful, offensive and derogatory content” and giving advertisers greater control over excluding specific sites.

Well, good. But this seems like a

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Must Reads in Media & Technology: March 20

Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
1. Inside Hearst’s Turbulent Quest to Build a Snapchat Brand (Jessica Schiffer / Digiday)

3. Fake Times (Jordan Crook / Tech Crunch)
5. ‘Truth’ is Diluted When Publishers Chase Scale (Chris Sutcliffe / The Media Briefing)
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The post Must Reads in Media & Technology: March 20 appeared first on MediaShift.

Here’s The Funniest Commercial of This Year’s Super Bowl (And it Only Aired in Washington DC)

The funniest commercial of this year’s Super Bowl only aired in one market, Washington DC. The spot was for Cyprus Air, an Alexandria, VA-based heating and cooling company. Viewers on Washington’s Fox affiliate WTTG were treated to a skilled Donald Trump impersonator advertising a promotion for the company. “This sale is YUGE!” The Trump impersonator said. Then a man identified as Joe said, “You want to see huge?” And then Joe held up his hand. The Trump impersonator prodded Joe to put his hand down with a perfectly played sheepish look. Compared to his own hand, Joe’s obviously was yuge. Well done, Cyrpus Air. Watch above, via WTTG. [featured image via screengrab] – Follow Joe DePaolo (@joe_depaolo) on Twitter

Here’s Why Terry Bradshaw Was Wearing a Stained Shirt During the Super Bowl Broadcast

Earlier, we posted about fans on Twitter being critical of the first half Super Bowl commercial offerings. If there was one first half spot that did catch people’s attention, though, it was a Tide commercial — only people didn’t immediately realize was a commercial. Early in the second quarter, Fox NFL studio hosts Curt Menefee and Terry Bradshaw appeared on screen, ostensibly to promote the halftime show with Lady Gaga. Everything appeared to be normal. Only, there was an impossible to miss red stain on Bradshaw’s shirt. Viewers noticed it immediately:

Here’s Why Terry Bradshaw Was Wearing a Stained Shirt During the Super Bowl Broadcast

Earlier, we posted about fans on Twitter being critical of the first half Super Bowl commercial offerings. If there was one first half spot that did catch people’s attention, though, it was a Tide commercial — only people didn’t immediately realize was a commercial. Early in the second quarter, Fox NFL studio hosts Curt Menefee and Terry Bradshaw appeared on screen, ostensibly to promote the halftime show with Lady Gaga. Everything appeared to be normal. Only, there was an impossible to miss red stain on Bradshaw’s shirt. Viewers noticed it immediately:

Here’s Why Terry Bradshaw Was Wearing a Stained Shirt During the Super Bowl Broadcast

Earlier, we posted about fans on Twitter being critical of the first half Super Bowl commercial offerings. If there was one first half spot that did catch people’s attention, though, it was a Tide commercial — only people didn’t immediately realize was a commercial. Early in the second quarter, Fox NFL studio hosts Curt Menefee and Terry Bradshaw appeared on screen, ostensibly to promote the halftime show with Lady Gaga. Everything appeared to be normal. Only, there was an impossible to miss red stain on Bradshaw’s shirt. Viewers noticed it immediately: