“If a Serial episode was a mountain peak, S-Town was the Himalayas”

On the flipside, it does maintain a status quo that continues to leave unreconciled the larger question about how the space will continue to play out structurally — that is, it holds in place the tension between podcasts-as-blogs contingent and podcasts-as-future-of-radio contingent that seemingly came to a public head last summer. (Here’s the relevant Hot Pod column from that time.) A lot has changed since then; the industry has continued to grow, more hit shows have come to be, more platforms have begun to encroach on Apple’s majority share with experiments in windowing and exclusives, and so on. There’s a legit story in here somewhere…but this isn’t quite it. Looks like we’ll have to keep being on the lookout. “If a Serial episode was a mountain peak, then S-Town was the Himalayas.” On Friday, PRX chief technology officer Andrew Kuklewicz published a Medium post discussing Continue reading "“If a Serial episode was a mountain peak, S-Town was the Himalayas”"

NPR’s upcoming daily news podcast sounds like a Morning Edition promo, which would be too bad

Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 114, published April 4, 2017. First things first. NPR announced Monday that it’s launching something called Up First, a take on the morning news brief podcast that draws from the DNA of Morning Edition, one of NPR’s two tentpole programs. Editions will be published at 6 a.m. ET on weekdays, starting Wednesday, and it will feature the same team of David Greene, Rachel Martin and Steve Inskeep on hosting duties. Nieman Lab, Poynter, and NPR’s own press blog have the assorted details on the project, including the press messaging surrounding this launch (“a way to do it that makes sense for the whole system”), target demographic breakdown (young folk, clearly), and the names involved in its development (note the headlining of Morning Edition EP Sarah Gilbert and NPR GM of pdcasting Neal Carruth). Let’s talk big picture here. The most meaningful Continue reading "NPR’s upcoming daily news podcast sounds like a Morning Edition promo, which would be too bad"

MediaShift Podcast #221: Facebook, Apple Push into TV; PewDiePie Dropped by Disney, YouTube; Local Media Consortium’s Rusty Coats

Thanks to our podcast sponsor, the International Women’s Media Foundation. Learn more about them and nominate a great woman journalist for one of their three awards! In the news this week, Facebook and Apple make moves into TV, but it might be BuzzFeed and NBC that make the biggest splash. YouTube star PewDiePie gets dumped by Disney’s Maker Studios for anti-Semitic videos, and his YouTube original show is canceled. Edward Snowden is president of the Freedom of the Press Foundation and is helping to develop tools to protect journalists and their sources. Politico’s Kelsey Sutton joins us to talk about Trump’s attacks on leakers and his selective choice of questioners at press conferences. Our Metric of the Week is Headline Metrics, and we speak with Rusty Coats, head of the Local Media Consortium, to talk about the prospects for local news in the digital age. Don’t have a lot of
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Continue reading "MediaShift Podcast #221: Facebook, Apple Push into TV; PewDiePie Dropped by Disney, YouTube; Local Media Consortium’s Rusty Coats"

Must Reads in Media & Technology: Feb. 17

Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox. 1. Mark Zuckerberg Takes on Fake News, the Importance of the News Industry and the Rise of Filter Bubbles in New Manifesto (Benjamin Mullin / Poynter)

Swipe to unlock: Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone 10 years ago today, changing journalism forever

Ten years ago today, Steve Jobs introduced the first iPhone — and also became the first person to publicly complain about how news is presented on iPhones. As part of his introduction to the phone’s capabilities, Jobs opened Safari and pulled up the full desktop version of the Times’ website. “We’re showing you the whole New York Times website,” Jobs said. But he also noted: “It’s kind of a slow site because it’s got a lot of images.” Jobs introduced the iPhone as three devices in one: a phone, a widescreen iPod, and an “Internet communications device.” Jobs’ presentation that day focused on using Safari as the main way to access the Internet; he even rotated the phone to view the Times’ website in landscape mode. He was initially against Continue reading "Swipe to unlock: Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone 10 years ago today, changing journalism forever"

Apple Takes Down New York Times Apps in China After Request From Chinese Government

new-york-times-hed-2013The New York Times reported today that their iTunes apps were removed in China last month after Apple was contacted by and complied with Chinese authorities. The publication stated that both the English-language and Chinese-language apps were removed on December 23rd, which happened a day after the paper published a piece about a Chinese propaganda video warning about the West’s “devilish claws.” The Times were told by an Apple spokesman that China told Apple the paper was in violation of local rules.
“We have been informed that the app is in violation of local regulations,” Fred Sainz, an Apple spokesman, said of the Times apps. “As a result, the app must be taken down off the China App Store. When this situation changes, the App Store will once again offer the New York Times app for download in China.”
Sainz wouldn’t tell the Times what violations they committed Continue reading "Apple Takes Down New York Times Apps in China After Request From Chinese Government"

Newsonomics: The 2016 media year by the numbers, and a look toward 2017

2016 goes down as a memorable year for those in and around the media. Though audience levels have never been higher, the digital transformation burden weighed ever more heavily on news media’s back. Then “the media” saw itself pummeled endlessly in the run-up to the election and even more in the weeks following November 8. We’re still assessing the damage, but the underlying weakness of the business of media offers more existential questions. Let’s look at the 2016 that was through the prism of numbers, and then look ahead. 99%: That’s how much of Facebook’s stuff isn’t fake, per Mark Zuckerberg’s first flustered take on fake news in the wake of Trump’s win. “Of all the content on Facebook, more than 99% of what people see is authentic. Only a very small amount is fake news and hoaxes.” I loved two things about that number. First, people share Continue reading "Newsonomics: The 2016 media year by the numbers, and a look toward 2017"