What is innovation in local TV news? Andrew Heyward’s new mission is to find out


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


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News flash: A lot of people still watch — and trust — the local TV news. TV is still the No. 1 source of news for Americans, ahead of the entire Internet. And of those TV watchers, nearly 3 in 4 are regular local TV news watchers. But the trendlines are moving in the wrong direction. In 2016, TV had a 19 percentage point lead over online as a frequent source of news for Americans (57 percent to 38 percent). A year later, that lead had been cut to 7 percentage points (50 percent to 43 percent). Cord-cutters and cord-nevers have moved from edge cases to mainstream; young people ages 18 to 24 have cut their TV viewing by abotu eight hours a week just in the past six years. It’s time for an update. Resources for innovation have, generally speaking, flowed more to local newspapers and digital-native publishers Continue reading "What is innovation in local TV news? Andrew Heyward’s new mission is to find out"

Local TV news gets a $2.6 million boost from the Knight Foundation


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


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In the “future of news” conversations, television news — especially local — can sometimes be overlooked. But it’s still a vital source of journalism for communities across the United States. The Knight Foundation announced today that it is boosting local TV news with $2.6 million across five organizations that will help students of color gain experience in local TV markets, bring together broadcast journalists focused on digital innovation in conferences and workshops, and offer ethics, leadership, and data journalism training for newsrooms. (Disclosure: Nieman Lab also receives support from Knight.) Though digital sources are ever rising, local TV news still reaches a significant chunk of Americans. Last year, Pew Research Center found that 50 percent were often getting news from TV compared to 43 percent often getting it online, though local TV news use declined the most. Over the years, local TV news’ audience has steadily Continue reading "Local TV news gets a $2.6 million boost from the Knight Foundation"

Journalism & Digital Education Roundup: June 29, 2017


This post is by Aileen Gallagher from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each Thursday, we round up the top stories of the week in journalism education and digital learning. Sign up here to get the Journalism & Digital Education Roundup delivered to your inbox.
  1. How Silicon Valley Pushed Coding Into American Classrooms (Natasha Singer / New York Times)

  2. Stop Censoring Student Journalists – We’re Trying to Hold Universities to Account (Anonymous / The Guardian)

  3. Digital Literacy is For Professors, Too (Shontavia Johnson / Inside Higher Ed)

  4. Arizona High School Students Imagine Journalism’s Future at ASU Camp (Stacy Sullivan /Arizona Republic)

  5. Why I’m Optimistic About the Next Wave of Education Technology (Jason Palmer / EdSurge)

The post Journalism & Digital Education Roundup: June 29, 2017 appeared first on MediaShift.

DigitalEd: How to Launch a Podcast


This post is by Megan Calcote from MediaShift


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Title: How to Launch a Podcast Instructor: Megan Calcote, Executive Producer, How to Cover Money & Educating Geeks Podcasts You’ve heard podcasts are hot again. But how do you launch one?  
Podcasting is experiencing a resurgence, with an increase in American podcast listeners, connected cars, the launch of podcast divisions by traditional media outlets such as WNYC and the rise of networks such as Podcast One, Radiotopia and Panoply. Find out how to join the movement and maximize your audience in this training that will tell you everything you need to know to get started in podcasting. We’ll show you how to equip a studio where you can produce professional-caliber audio with minimal investment. Learn tricks for developing, capturing and editing the content of your podcast. Find out which networks your podcast should be on to attract your audience and learn the basics of social media marketing. What Continue reading "DigitalEd: How to Launch a Podcast"

DigitalEd: How To Automate Social Media


This post is by Megan Calcote from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Title: How To Automate Social Media

Instructor: Megan Calcote, Program Coordinator, Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism & Co-Executive Producer, Educating Geeks

Make social media work for you around the clock.

If you’re ready to expand your marketing efforts but you don’t want to manage your social media 24 hours a day, this online training can help. We’ll show you how to automate your social media posts without losing authenticity. Find out how to increase audience reach and engagement while improving the effectiveness and efficiency of your social operations.

Learn why automated scheduling can be a powerful tool for your brand and how to use it in conjunction with real-time posts. Discover ways to determine the best times to post your updates. See powerful social media scheduling tools in action. You’ll take away ideas to help you develop an expanded social strategy and tools to help you Continue reading "DigitalEd: How To Automate Social Media"

Brain food: Here are 15 smart people talking for 5 minutes each about journalism’s future


This post is by Joshua Benton from Nieman Lab


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Newsgeist is “a gathering of 150 key practitioners and thinkers from the worlds of journalism, technology, and public policy who are re-imagining the future of the news,” usually (though not always) at Arizona State University. It’s sponsored by Google and the Knight Foundation (disclosure: a Nieman Lab funder), and it serves as a significant meeting of the minds; Google’s AMP was born out of brainstorming at one recent iteration of Newsgeist, for instance. I’ve been a happy attendee over the past few years. Most of Newsgeist is made up of unconference-y sessions that are off the record. But there is one part of the event that is recorded and rendered public: a series of Ignite sessions featuring some of the smartest people in digital media. Those have been posted to YouTube, but seeing as none of them have even 200 views at this writing, they could use Continue reading "Brain food: Here are 15 smart people talking for 5 minutes each about journalism’s future"

Static Site Lessons from Building the ‘Weed Rush’ Project


This post is by Niclas Lindh from MediaShift


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How did I spend last summer? Thinking a lot about pot and how people would navigate to learn more about it. It’s better than it sounds. I spend my summers helping create the website for an investigative project called News21. Each year, a team of fellows from universities around the U.S. dives deep into a topic and the resulting content is then syndicated with major partners like The Washington Post, USA Today and many others. But the content also needs a permanent home on the Web, so we build a site. Our focus in 2015 was “America’s Weed Rush.” The site contains images, video, interactive infographics, and, of course, text stories. It must be attractive and innovative. It also has to be built on a very compressed schedule, with actual page production limited to a few weeks and the site functionality and design around 10 weeks. And then
Sections page for America’s Weed Rush
Science section from America’s Weed Rush home page
Continue reading "Static Site Lessons from Building the ‘Weed Rush’ Project"

Watch Michael Phelps Distract a College Basketball Free-Thrower by Dancing in a Speedo


This post is by Ken Meyer from Mediaite


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PicMonkey Collage - PhelpsOlympic gold medalist Michael Phelps has been spending a lot of time at Arizona State University recently, swimming and training for this year’s competition in Rio. Last night, Phelps took a break for the ASU Sun Devils basketball game against Oregon State, and he really put himself out there by taking part in one of the most infamous aspects of the school’s student section. In a strange but extremely funny school tradition, the school’s undergraduate fans, called the 942 Crew, have a designated area behind one of their baskets to distract rival teams whenever they take free throws. Known as the Curtain of Distraction, the Washington Post noted how any number of mysterious and horrifying things can emerge from it: from Elvis Presley impersonators, to twerking farm animals. Last night, the 942 Crew announced that Phelps would be part of their latest prank, and when they emerged… they certainly distracted.

DigitalEd: Social Media Strategy and Analytics


This post is by Megan Calcote from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Title: Social Media Strategy and Analytics Instructor: Megan Calcote, Social Media Manager, Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism Go beyond “post and pray” to a tailored social strategy
You’re using social media, but you know you could use it better. This training will show you how to develop a social media strategy and monitor its effectiveness using analytics, starting with identifying the right strategies for your business or personal brand and how to set up experiments to test your target audience. You’ll also learn how to use some of the deeper functions and nuances of the popular social media platforms to make your posts and efforts more effective.   We’ll also cover how to use social media management apps, easy ways to stay up-to-date on your favorite social platforms, and how to use attention to detail in your posts can amplify your presence and measure your success. What Continue reading "DigitalEd: Social Media Strategy and Analytics"

DigitalEd: 5 Tech Tools to Improve Your Reporting


This post is by Evan Wyloge from MediaShift


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Title: 5 Tech Tools to Improve Your Reporting Instructor: Evan Wyloge, Senior Reporter, Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting Whether you’re an investigative journalist or a daily beat reporter, free and low-cost technical tools and apps can help you improve and streamline your reporting.
We’ll introduce you to tech tools and platforms that will help you obtain and manipulate data. You’ll learn how to scrape social accounts, without knowing any code. And you’ll discover how to use features that are built into services you already use in more powerful ways. Plus, we’ll look at some popular (free!) project management software and applications to help you collaborate with colleagues and manage reporting projects. What you’ll learn from this training:
  1. How to use lesser-known functions in tools you already use every day, such as the advanced search tools in popular search and social applications;
  2. How to use a suite of tools that Continue reading "DigitalEd: 5 Tech Tools to Improve Your Reporting"

How News21 Immerses Students into Innovative Storytelling


This post is by Dominick DiFurio from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




There’s been plenty of banter online about whether a degree in journalism is useful to aspiring journalists. Influential self-made journalists like Vox’s Ezra Klein have advised young journalists to steer clear of a degree that would teach you, “bad habits and make you pay for the privilege of learning them.” In school people endlessly preached that the in-depth journalism I loved to take part in was difficult to do in the real world of newsrooms, where resources for that type of thing are scarce. I was a graduating senior, a stressful position for anyone but especially for a reporter looking for depth. My plan for after graduation was ambiguous at best. Then I decided to apply for News21, a Carnegie-Knight funded investigative journalism fellowship for undergraduate, graduate and recently graduated journalism students. My months digging into reporting on marijuana for the project quickly taught me that experiences like News21 are the best
Diving in the Smith River
“Recently established marijuana testing labs operate without the typical oversight that exists in the lab industry. Without comprehensive regulation, scientists say medical marijuana patients are at risk of consuming contaminated weed.”
Continue reading "How News21 Immerses Students into Innovative Storytelling"

Why Journalists Make Great Entrepreneurs


This post is by Kathryn McManus from Mediashift


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There is tremendous transition within the field of journalism. The number of full-time U.S. daily newspaper journalists now stands roughly at 36,700, according to the American Society of News Editors, down from 55,000 in 2008. I constantly receive calls from journalism colleagues who are in transition and grappling with how to move forward with their expertise. For any journalist who is in a state of transition, it is tremendously useful to know how to build on an idea and scale it into a business. I am fortunate to teach entrepreneurship at the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Each semester I break the class into three teams and ask thought leaders in journalism, technology, and communications to share a real-life challenge they see within our industry. These thought leaders have recently included Chris Crommett, founder of CNN en Español; Louis Libin, former CTO of NBC and president of Continue reading "Why Journalists Make Great Entrepreneurs"

DigitalEd: How to Improve Audience Engagement and Digital Outreach


This post is by Rebecca Blatt from Mediashift


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PBS MediaShift is launching a new series of online training courses called DigitalEd, in partnership with BigMarker. These one-hour live courses will help teach practical digital skills with experienced instructors. Title: How to Improve Audience Engagement and Digital Outreach Instructor: Rebecca Blatt, professor at Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and leader of of Cronkite’s Public Insight Network Bureau Tools and tactics for connecting with your community Join us for a one-hour training exploring audience engagement and digital outreach. You’ll learn strategies for engaging audiences and communities before, during and after the publication of a story, and how to measure the impact of your efforts. This session will also identify challenges journalists often face in engagement work, and offer resources for addressing them. This webinar is presented in partnership with the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism and will be taught by Rebecca Blatt, director of the Public Insight Network Bureau at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. What you’ll learn from this training:
  1. The benefits of and opportunities for journalistic engagement
  2. How to engage a community early in the reporting process to set an agenda for coverage and understand the information needs of the audience
  3. How to gather personal stories, insights and questions from a range of community members
  4. How to use social media to expand your engagement audience
  5. How gathering feedback from an audience can complement insights from data analytics
  6. Strategies for measuring the impact of engagement efforts
Handouts:
  • Examples of successful engagement projects
  • Frameworks for measuring the impact of engagement
  • Event-planning guide
  • A list of helpful online resources for journalistic engagement
Who should take this training:
  • All journalists or engagement specialists with insights or questions to share
  • Journalists looking for ways to engage more deeply with their communities
  • Journalists looking for ways to diversify sourcing or find new story ideas
  • Journalism students who are interested in learning more about community or audience engagement
  • Community-engagement editors looking for fresh ideas or looking to connect with other people who have similar interests
  • Web producers interested in expanding audiences or engagement
  • Newsroom managers considering an expansion of community engagement efforts
Date and Time: May 19, 2015 at 1 pm ET / 10 am PT Price: $39 Note: If you can’t attend the live session, you can still register and see the archived video and ask questions of the instructor. Registration for BigMarker is required. About the Instructor: Rebecca Blatt leads Cronkite’s Public Insight Network Bureau, a professional program in which students mine news sources and generate story ideas for professional news organizations. Blatt, a former senior editor for special projects at WAMU in Washington, D.C., managed community outreach and engagement efforts using American Public Media’s Public Insight Network, an innovative database of more than 200,000 citizen sources. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including honors from the Education Writers Association, the Journalism Center on Children and Families, and the New York Festivals Radio Awards.    

DigitalEd: How to Create and Monetize an Entrepreneurial Journalism Venture


This post is by Kathryn McManus from Mediashift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




PBS MediaShift is launching a new series of online training courses called DigitalEd, in partnership with BigMarker. These one-hour live courses will help teach practical digital skills with experienced instructors. Title: How to Create and Monetize an Entrepreneurial Journalism Venture
Instructor: Kathryn McManus, VP at SocialWhirled and faculty associate at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Constructing an entrepreneurial framework During this one-hour training, you will learn how to craft an entrepreneurial framework for your own journalism venture, and find ways to potentially earn money from it. The course will help you to identify needs and opportunities in your area, develop scalable solutions to those problems and implement them. This training is presented in partnership with the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. What you’ll learn from this training:
  1. How to identify a challenge within journalism that could lead to an entrepreneurial solution
  2. An entrepreneurial framework to tackle the challenge
  3. The importance of leadership positioning
  4. How to form a board of advisors
  5. What is needed to seek funding
Handouts:
  • An entrepreneurial framework
Who should take this training:
  • This course is geared towards journalists who are interested in learning about or becoming entrepreneurs
  • Journalists, freelance Journalists and students of journalism will benefit
Date and Time: May 6, 2015 at 1 pm ET / 10 am PT Price: $39 Note: If you can’t attend the live session, you can still register and see the archived video and ask questions of the instructor. Registration for BigMarker is required. About the Instructor: Kathryn McManus joined SocialWhirled as the vice president of communications and strategy in 2014. She also is a faculty associate at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, teaching its flagship entrepreneurship program. McManus served as an international assignment editor, and an internal consultant for streamlining operations at CNN before launching CNN Japan. She also developed and sold NewsCertified Exchange, which created a communications solution that connected interview-ready thought leaders with journalists from over 250 of the world’s top media outlets.

How to Get Your Game On in the Newsroom


This post is by Aleszu Bajak from Mediashift


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We’re always playing games. As kids it was kick the can, hide and seek, tag. As grownups, it’s more often Candy Crush and crosswords. But what if games could help tell news stories? What if a game like Candy Crush taught us how to balance the nation’s budget? News outlets, including BuzzFeed, the New York Times, ProPublica, and the Washington Post, have been incorporating games to engage and inform readers and drive new audiences to their sites. Games are emerging as a new tool for journalism, offering at times a playful approach to consuming news. From popular quizzes to games that inspire empathy, this playful format is potentially rich new terrain for journalists working hard to engage readers and have them relate to the stories they are trying to tell. But not every outlet has the budget or staff to build “Spot the Ball,” for example, a game the New York Times created which removes the soccer ball from a series of Brazil World Cup photos and asks readers to guess its whereabouts. And not all editors are convinced, or even aware, of them as a new way to tell stories.
spottheball

The New York Times’ Spot the Ball, screenshot.

From ‘gamification’ to journalism

Integrating “gamification” into the news has its hurdles, said Max Foxman, a PhD student at Columbia University’s Department of Communication who studies how games are being used journalistically. Tight deadlines and not enough design and programming staff are two hurdles to deploying games in the newsroom. But beginning to integrate and create games is becoming easier, especially when game platforms can be repurposed for specific stories. Foxman recently published a research paper, “Play the News: Fun and Games in Digital Journalism.” He examined whether and how journalists were applying games, play, and fun to the creation of news. He interviewed journalists at dozens of newsrooms currently experimenting with games, including Mother Jones, known for its political quizzes, and the New York Times, which featured the popular “Dialect Quiz.” Foxman found that the most pioneering journalists creating games were able to think like game designers when building news products that had an element of gamification. Gamification is the practice of applying game theories and game mechanics like X AND Y into non-gaming applications like journalism. These kind of “gamified” news products could be anything from a budget-balancing game to a pop culture quiz. But convincing editors in newsrooms to gamify news is in many ways an uphill battle. “Part of the problem is that they don’t know enough and they don’t have the infrastructure to turn around games quickly,” said Retha Hill, director of the New Media Innovation Lab at Arizona State University’s Cronkite School of Journalism. “Even if you’re a progressive editor that’s interested in games one of the first things you have to do is make a game engaging so people come back and play it again. That’s hard.” After running a few news games workshops with ASU students, Hill started a news game course to introduce students to the idea of marrying journalism and games. Working with ASU’s Center for
Cutthroat Capitalism from Wired magazine.
buzzfeedolym
tallanasty
storybench-logo
Continue reading "How to Get Your Game On in the Newsroom"

Journalism & Digital Education Roundup, April 9, 2015


This post is by Julie Keck from Mediashift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




  1. Top journalism students to lead in-depth marijuana report at ASU (via ASU News)

  2. Three ways to improve technology-assisted learning (Matt Candler / Medium)

  3. How can we really get more women into tech? (Suw / Finding Ada)

  4. Do j-school classes have a diversity problem? Ask the students (Aeman Ansari / J-Source)

  5. Public and private schools share edtech strategies in Twitter chat (Audrey Armitage / Education Week)

  6. New offering from Noodle will help colleges build online programs (Casey Fabris / Chronicle of Higher Education)

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University Offers ‘The Problem of Whiteness’ Course; Fox & Friends Pounces


This post is by Josh Feldman from Mediaite


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Arizona State University is offering a course called “Studies in Amer Lit/Culture: U.S. Race Theory & the Problem of Whiteness.” The course is currently underway, and, according to Campus Reform, students in the class are reading books like Everyday Language of White Racism and The Alchemy of Race and Rights. As the university explained to Talking Points Memo, the goal of the course is to “look at how stories shape people’s understandings and experiences of race.” The course is meant to confront race in a way that people generally don’t talk about it and hopes that people will “reach thoughtful conclusions rather than display gut reactions.” Campus Reform’s Lauren Clark discussed the course with Elisabeth Hasselbeck on Fox & Friends earlier, and Hasselbeck was very disturbed by the course. She wondered if a class called “The Problem with Blackness” or “The Problem with Being Female” would fly. Watch the video below, via Fox News: [image via screengrab] – – Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

Starbucks Not Actually Funding Program to Send Employees to College


This post is by Tina Nguyen from Mediaite


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Despite Starbucks’s celebrated announcement earlier this week that they would pay for their employees’ tuition and bachelor’s degrees, representatives from Arizona State University told a different story: Namely, that Starbucks itself is not actually contributing any money to their employees’ education. Instead, as the AP reported, ASU is offering Starbucks employees a reduced tuition, and the student is expected, in some cases to pay the rest with a mix of federal loans and/or out of pocket. In short, Starbucks is not actually paying — as in “here is money out of our own pocket, now go to college”-type paying — for its employees to go to college. But they are. But not really. Oh, this is confusing. The actual setup is a little more complicated, according to ASU and Starbucks spokespeople, and involves more “tuition reimbursement” than “tuition paying”:
Starbucks said Thursday that the scholarship is a reduced tuition rate. It estimates the reduction in tuition would average about $6,500 over two years to cover tuition of $30,000. To cover the remainder in the freshman and sophomore years, workers would apply for federal aid, such as Pell grants, and pay for the rest either out of pocket or by taking out loans. Starbucks would bear no costs in those years.
For the junior and senior years, Starbucks would reimburse workers for whatever tuition they had to cover either upfront or through loans, once they completed 21 credits. Matt Ryan, chief strategy officer for Starbucks, said on Thursday that for a worker’s junior and senior years, the company could potentially cover up to 58 percent of the tuition, in cases where workers didn’t qualify for grants. If workers did qualify for grants, he said Starbucks could be responsible for very little, if anything. He noted that workers financial situations can vary greatly.

While it’s still a generous program, especially compared with many companies who pay their employes no tuition (or just a living wage), it still brings up complicated questions, such as whether employees can qualify for federal aid when they’re also required to work at Starbucks during their classes, or whether online education will be the best fit for employees who want to take advantage of the problem, or even whether it’s unfair that freshmen and sophomores can’t take full advantage of the program. [AP via Newsmax]
[Image via Sean Wandzilak / Shutterstock.com] – –
Follow Tina Nguyen (@Tina_Nguyen) on Twitter

Arizona State Fraternity Suspended for Incredibly Weird ‘MLK Black Party’


This post is by Josh Feldman from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Arizona State University chapter of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity has been suspended following an “MLK Black Party” members held yesterday, an event that many condemned as blatantly offensive. Attendees of the frat party wore basketball jerseys and flashed gang signs, among other things, and posted some photos online.



In a statement, ASU said, “[I]t is unfortunate that a few misguided individuals held an offensive party at a time when ASU, the state and the nation are celebrating Dr. King’s achievements and legacy. The university will not tolerate this kind of behavior.”

ASU’s TKE chapter was previously suspended for inappropriate conduct and were just reinstated last month. Oof.

[h/t Gawker]

[photos via KPHO]

– –

Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac