Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)

“It feels to me as though America is becoming more European,” said Emily Bell, director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism. “It’s saying the not-for-profit sector has a real place in publishing, not just a sort of patch to get from here to the next profitable model. And then it’s asking, please, Europe, help us with the regulation.” This was in the middle of a free-wheeling discussion at Harvard Business School Friday, “The Future of Advertising and Publishing: Finding New Revenue Models for Journalism in the Digital Age.” The afternoon’s first panel was moderated by Bell and brought together Kinsey Wilson, digital strategist at The New York Times; David Carroll, associate professor of media design at The New School’s Parsons School of Design; and Nicco Mele, director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, for Continue reading "Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)"

Trevor Noah: Trump ‘Prefers White People Over Black People’

‘ Much to the chagrin of his conservative critics, The Daily Show host Trevor Noah has been consistently outspoken against President Donald Trump, often foregoing the comedic side of his show to go on lengthy political monologues — and his latest comments on the president were no exception. Though Noah said he wasn’t sure if Trump “is a white supremacist” or not, he did accuse the president of preferring “white people over black people” in an interview with the BBC. His justification for such a claim was Trump’s history as a businessman, a candidate, and now the president. “I don’t know if Donald Trump is a white supremacist, I do know that he prefers white people over black people. I do know that he has specifically gone out of his way with his companies to oppress black people, I do know that he hasn’t been as quick to react Continue reading "Trevor Noah: Trump ‘Prefers White People Over Black People’"

Must Reads in Media & Technology: July 14

Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
1. CBS News and BBC News Join Forces Around the Globe (CBS) 2. HuffPost Goes out in Search of Middle America (Hadas Gold / Politico)
3. Brands Use Workarounds to be Found on Snapchat (Ilyse Liffreing / Digiday)
Get the Daily Must Reads in Your Inbox!


The post Must Reads in Media & Technology: July 14 appeared first on MediaShift.

Must Reads in Media & Technology: July 5

Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox. 1. The Wall Street Journal Shutters Eight Blogs: “The Tools for Telling” Stories Have Changed (Christine Schmidt / Nieman Lab) 2. The Economist is Helping Advertisers Find Economist Readers Off Its Properties (Jessica Davies / Digiday) 3. The Houston Chronicle has a BBQ Podcast, a Site for Smarties and Big Plans for Turning Readers into Subscribers (Kristen Hare / Poynter) 4. BBC Prioritizing Live Video in News App to Take on Facebook and Youtube as it Looks to Win Over Younger Audience (Freddy Mayhew / Press Gazette) 5. ‘A Dicey Situation’: Snapchat Gives Influencers the Cold Shoulder (Yuyu Chen / Digiday) 6. John Oliver: Why Some Local News Is Getting More Conservative (Erik Hayden / Continue reading "Must Reads in Media & Technology: July 5"

Money and politics: A new report covers the advantages — and pressures — of the BBC compared to US news orgs

Those disheartened by the way that U.S. media organizations covered the 2016 election likely long for the American equivalent of the BBC: a large, publicly funded broadcast organization free of the commercial pressures that made Donald Trump a permanent fixture of news programs in the year leading up to his victory. But not even the BBC approach is free of its challenges, as Helen Boaden, a former BBC News and BBC Radio director, writes in a new paper for the Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center. While the BBC is massively well-funded, and built on impartial coverage, its role in the U.K. media environment exposes it to some unique challenges. The same goes for news organizations in the U.S., whose applications of free market principles to news has become both an asset and liability. Here are a few of Boaden’s conclusions: — In the U.S., “money is Continue reading "Money and politics: A new report covers the advantages — and pressures — of the BBC compared to US news orgs"

White House Pushes Back After Reporters Claim on Twitter He Ignored Translation at G7 Summit

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer countered a BBC reporter’s Twitter claim on Saturday that President Donald Trump had “chosen not to hear a translation of his Italian host’s speech” during the recent G7 summit. “As usual @POTUS [Trump] wears a single ear piece for translation in his right ear,” Spicer wrote in a Saturday Tweet. The Trump administration flack was directly addressing a Twitter post from earlier in the day by BBC diplomatic correspondent James Landale. The claim led to hot takes by other journalists:

BBC Threatens to Call Your Boss If You Post Comments They Think Are ‘Offensive’

BBC BBC is receiving some pushback from free speech advocates after the broadcaster released the latest version of their privacy policy, which included a warning that “if you post or send offensive, inappropriate or objectionable content anywhere on or to BBC websites…the BBC may use your personal information to stop such behaviour.” The section about “offensive or inappropriate content on BBC websites” continued by underlining that a publicly-funded British media corporation “may use your personal information to inform relevant third parties such as your employer, school email/internet provider or law enforcement agencies about the content and your behaviour.” The warning is actually not a new addition to the BBC’s privacy policy, as identical language is contained in the September 2016 version of the document. But the latest edition got some attention from Twitter users, starting on Wednesday.