How to Use Twitter to Connect Online Students to News


This post is by Kate Nash Cunningham from MediaShift


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Like many journalism educators across the country, I’ve been teaching more news writing classes online. It’s a challenge, but also an opportunity to connect with students – and to connect them with the curriculum – in new ways. To be clear, teaching AP Style or lead writing to students I can’t work with in person is definitely different. I like sitting next to students at a computer to go through edits, and I think explaining the nuances of writing and editing are best done face to face. But teaching news writing online offers unique chances to interact with students, and to connect students to each other at the same time. For my Writing and Editing for Multimedia class at the University of New Mexico, I’ve been using Twitter as a space outside our discussion boards where students can talk and learn about journalism.   These public posts put students in Continue reading "How to Use Twitter to Connect Online Students to News"

MediaShift Launches New Peer Group Trainings for Publishers


This post is by Mark Glaser from MediaShift


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We know that our MediaShift community likes learning new things. That’s why we have always offered guides and how-to’s on our site, weekly DigitalEd trainings and panels and in-person workshops. But we thought it would be a good idea to also try peer training groups as well. After our series of Platforms + Publishers private roundtables between small and medium-sized publishers and platforms such as Facebook and Google, we decided to continue supporting publishers within peer groups. With support from the Knight Foundation and Center for Cooperative Media at Montclair State University, MediaShift recently soft-launched our new DigitalEd Peer-to-Peer Network with three peer groups. These include people from organizations such as: WGBH
Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting
PublicSource
The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting
The Hechinger Report
Louisville Public Media
NJ Spotlight
Berkeleyside
… and many others. We want to support publishers whether they are non-profit, for-profit, hyper-local,
people connected training seminar
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How to Introduce Podcasting to the Journalism Classroom


This post is by Jane Bannester from MediaShift


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Listen to Ritenour High School broadcast adviser Jane Bannester and her students talk about their adventures in podcasting — what they’ve learned and how they’ve grown personally — in their own voices. I love new trends in broadcasting, and nothing is hotter today than podcasting, those episodic audio or video programs available for download by an audience. Despite terrestrial radio’s consistent hold on listeners, podcasting has seen an ever-present increase of listeners with 21-24 percent growth year-over-year. Can you believe the largest growth is coming from the age 18-34 demographic? When we see a media gaining ground in culture, it’s the right moment to invest a staff’s time and resources into becoming prolific in that medium, and that’s what we’ve done at Ritenour High School to build students’ skills and their confidence as journalists.

Thinking Specifically About Format

First, we must understand that podcasts are very specific, topic-oriented shows. I
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How to Make the Transition to Teaching Media Courses Online


This post is by Rebecca Newman from MediaShift


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Students DO NOT watch the evening news and certainly do not read a paper newspaper.  They may occasionally click on a news site such as CNN or ABCNews, but if they click anything, it is probably BuzzFeed, Vice or ENews. They are not not consuming news; they are just getting it and sharing it in a completely new way. I realized this when the Marjory Stoneman Douglas student journalists broadcasted live via Snapchat and Instagram as their school, friends and teachers were being attacked.  Despite horrific circumstances, those student journalists kept the tape rolling to share with the world what was going on in that school. As a result, these young people created a movement that originated and now is communicated with their peers and the world strictly online.      This means, as teachers, we need to meet our students where they are – online, all the time. It is
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5 Key Points for Journalism Educators Who Want to Teach Online


This post is by Kate Ames from MediaShift


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If you’re transitioning to teaching students online, then you’re possibly in one of two camps: you’re resistant because you believe face-to-face teaching is better, or you’re resigned because you know it is a matter of when, not if. Finding a truly passionate distance educator in a field where much of the learning has to be practical (how to write, use a camera, record sound) has, in my experience, been difficult. Most people design curriculum with the on-campus student in mind, and then make amendments for the distance student. However, journalism education by distance seems a natural fit. Journalists routinely have to work remotely, receiving briefs from editors thousands of miles away. They create and file stories using a diverse range of technologies, and need to be mobile, adaptable, social and able to negotiate complexity when conducting research. So thinking of the roving correspondent, who can’t make it for critical training,
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Teaching Media Literacy With A Cape After SXSWEdu


This post is by Jonathan Rogers from MediaShift


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Before I attended danah boyd’s campfire discussion at SXSWEdu on Media Literacy, I had been promoting it heavily with the hashtags #savetheworld #teachmedialit. In her talk, however, boyd strongly questioned the notion of media literacy’s ability to save the world.  Slowly tucking my cape back into my bag, I walked out of the keynote unsettled, which was probably her point. Some of the old school methods, as boyd pointed out at SXSWEdu, may not be effective against the new “weaponized digital media,” trolls, bots and online political forces with millions of dollars behind them. She has concerns about the good will and the truth that many bloggers are sending out over the internet.  She sees neo-nazis and other extremists filling the new digital media with mirrors of truth, hate and evil. In a post-modern way, I believe she also argues whether or not the truth can be found
Continue reading "Teaching Media Literacy With A Cape After SXSWEdu"

How J-School Professors, Students Can (and Should) Unplug


This post is by Leslie-Jean Thornton from MediaShift


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Click the image to read the whole series.

The 2018 National Day of Unplugging is on March 9-10 from sundown to sundown. When I began teaching full time, shortly before 9/11, I brought news into the classroom by any means possible. Pre-iPhone, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and well-developed online news, I cadged AP news budgets from newsroom friends, toted the latest newspapers and wheeled in TV carts. For the past year or so, I’ve often looked for ways to keep news out. These days, news is ubiquitous, like ambient noise. It arrives in streams of constant, unsettling, confusing, contradictory information propelled by events that can defy immediate sense. What to make of a president who denigrates journalism by calling it fake, then – by The Washington Post’s count – averages about six false or misleading statements a day since taking office? Can we bear to hear of one more school shooting Continue reading "How J-School Professors, Students Can (and Should) Unplug"

How to Create Online Journalism Courses with Instant Adjustments


This post is by Amanda C. Bright from MediaShift


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In a perfect world, journalism education would be fully responsive to a learner’s individual needs. Whether teaching Introduction to Reporting or Advanced Data Visualization, instructors could ascertain students’ exact understanding and then support them to their next level. Of course, like any utopian narrative, differentiated instruction is constrained because there will always be a range of skill levels in any class. It is even more complex when the course is online. Yet in online journalism education, and particularly with college-level or adult learners who know their capabilities and goals, there is a real opportunity for highly responsive learning. In my experience teaching online journalism courses, I’ve forged a path into individualized learning through repetitive needs assessment, and although it’s time consuming, I think it’s worth a look for journalism educators as more coursework moves online.

What is Needs Assessment?

As part of most instructional design models, needs assessment (sometimes
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9 Practical Ways to Foster Innovation in a J-School Classroom


This post is by Mark Berkey-Gerard from MediaShift


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The challenge for journalism education is clear: innovate or become obsolete. In reality, innovation is easy to talk about, but difficult to undertake in a traditional university setting. Academic institutions can be even more resistant to change than legacy news organizations. Curriculum overhauls can take years. And even the most ambitious students are often afraid of taking risks that may affect their grades. So how can journalism educators create space for more experimentation in the journalism classroom? From 1999 to 2006, I was fortunate to work as an editor for a groundbreaking, local news website. At a time when some news organizations refused to even link to other websites, we built databases of public information, created interactive games and covered local communities by inviting residents to participate in the process. We distinguished ourselves by trying things that traditional news organizations couldn’t or wouldn’t. While the news industry has evolved greatly
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#EdShift Chat: How to Discuss, Teach Journalism Students to Report on Sexual Abuse


This post is by Amanda C. Bright from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




There is perhaps no more visible and complex topic right now than sexual assault and harassment. Sparked by the #MeToo movement, conversations about gender and sexual abuse are commonplace as media headlines continually bring awareness to these issues.

For journalism educators, discussions in classrooms have become more pointed, while courses that teach reporting see the need to address questions of coverage about such intense issues.

In recent EducationShift articles by Tracy Everbach and Candi Carter Olson, the journalism educators and researchers shared thoughts about how to engage in meaningful discussions about sexual violence and harassment in journalism courses, as well as presented a four-step guide to helping students learn to report on sexual abuse as professional journalists. “Journalists reporting on these types of stories need to know some of the basics about sexual abuse and violence, as well as myths that continue to be perpetuated,” Olson and Everbach said. “Accurate Continue reading "#EdShift Chat: How to Discuss, Teach Journalism Students to Report on Sexual Abuse"

SembraMedia Launches Online School for Entrepreneurial Journalism in Spanish


This post is by Isabela Ponce from MediaShift


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This story is also available in Spanish on SembraMedia’s site. I discovered content marketing in 2015. The media outlet I co-founded in 2011 in Ecuador, GK, was going through a crisis: We were having trouble selling advertising because some of our news coverage was controversial, and an initial investment we’d won was almost gone. At about that time, the head of the communication department of an automobile brand called and asked: “Is there a way that I could have content on my site that’s as well written as the content on GK?”

GK.city website

The question was almost a challenge. After meeting with our future client, we found the answer to our problems: content marketing. At first, we were uncomfortable even saying the words; we were journalists first. But as we started thinking creatively, we realized how we could use our reporting and writing skills to do
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How to Teach Reporting on Sexual Abuse


This post is by Candi Carter Olson and Tracy Everbach from MediaShift


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In November 2017, a group of students in a Utah State University journalism class were fact-checking articles on sexual assault charges against U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore. Students universally noted that the only sources in the articles were white men, all of whom seemed to be friends with Moore. Students in Candi Carter Olson’s class also identified comments in other articles about the Alabama Republican Senate candidate, who was accused of initiating a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl when he was 32 and pursuing several other teenage girls when he was in his 30s:
  • “It was 40 years ago.”
  • “Take Joseph and Mary. Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus.”
  • “There’s nothing wrong with a 30-year-old single male asking a 19-year-old, a 17-year-old, or a 16-year-old out on a date.”
The discussion led one student to raise
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How to Easily Introduce Chatbots to Journalism Students


This post is by Richard Jones from MediaShift


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If I had a penny for every piece of technology fleetingly considered the “future of journalism,” then I suppose I’d have quite a lot of pennies by now, if not quite enough to retire on. Chatbots are one such technology, with CNN, the Wall Street Journal and the Guardian among those launching experimental versions within Facebook Messenger. The attractiveness of using messaging apps to get content to readers isn’t hard to work out: they offer the prospect of reaching a large number of people through popular platforms such as Messenger and WhatsApp, they have a high clickthrough rate, and they include less of the unpredictability associated with the algorithms that surface content on Facebook’s News Feed, Twitter and Instagram. Then there’s the growing presence in our homes of voice-activated tools such as Amazon Echo. Becoming the news brand that we ask Alexa for has the potential to be a goal
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Why Teaching Data Journalism is a Challenge at Most Universities


This post is by Kayt Davies from MediaShift


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This story originally appeared on Data Driven Journalism: Where Journalism Meets Data. Awareness that data journalism is a serious and valuable part of contemporary journalism has well and truly dawned. There are — and hopefully always will be — inventive front-runners finding new ways to fulfill journalism’s time-honored mission, while also using the latest tools available. But, what has been slower is the induction of these trailblazers’ key ideas into the curriculum of everyday journalism education. And this is no small thing. This was my dilemma in early 2016. My way forward was research. I wrote an academic paper that involved reviewing the literature and interviewing 35 other Australian journalism academics about what they were doing about the problem. What I learned, in brief, was that I was not alone, and there were tools and techniques that could help effectively bring data into journalism curricula.

Translating the Profession to Education

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Australian Journalism Education Fueled by International Collaboration, Field Experiences


This post is by Wajeehah Aayeshah from MediaShift


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The byline of the article caught my eye: “Reporting from Pakistan.” As a Pakistani settled in Melbourne, I was baffled. How could this Australian university-run news website have special reports from Pakistan? RMIT Senior Lecturer Alexandra Wake, a participant in my research project on trends in Australian journalism education, explained it was the product of an international collaboration between RMIT University (Melbourne, Australia), University of Peshawar (Peshawar, Pakistan), and University of Stanford (Stanford, Calif, USA). International collaborations like this one, as well as those with indigenous groups and across various regions of the country, are driving Australian journalism education right now. Additional key shifts include an emphasis on entrepreneurship, adaptation to a changing industry and a focus on indigenous cultures, all of which help students build connections in a global society.

How International Collaboration Worked

The students from Melbourne and Peshawar had a joint classroom via Skype
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How J-Schools Are Innovating by Reporting on Solutions


This post is by Holly Wise from MediaShift


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In journalism school, I had one career goal: to be an international humanitarian reporter and report on stories that left a tangible impact on my subjects and integrated community trust and engagement with my audience. It wasn’t until my second job as the bureau chief of the Silver City Sun-News in Silver City, New Mexico, that I learned I didn’t need an international platform to achieve these goals. I needed the basic journalism skills I’d acquired in college, plus a little extra – the practice of solutions journalism. Fast forward several years and journalism schools are recognizing the need (and student demand) for solutions journalism, defined by the Solutions Journalism Network as rigorous reporting on how communities respond to social problems. In my current role as the director of journalism school engagement at SJN, I evangelize the practice of solutions journalism in classrooms across the United States, reaching students who
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4 Key Steps To Getting an RJI Fellowship


This post is by Bianca Fortis from MediaShift


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This is a sponsored post for the RJI Fellowship. Apply for a Fellowship by January 31, 2018. Journalism fellowships are great opportunities for established journalists both to gain a professional support system and to grow as professionals by working on new, innovative projects.

Connor Sheets

The Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute is currently accepting proposals from individuals and organizations who want to develop projects that can better journalism. RJI offers three options: residential fellowships, during which Fellows live and work in Columbia, Mo., for 8 months; non-residential fellowships which allow Fellows to work remotely; and institutional Fellowships that allow people to continue to work in their workplace. Fellows get stipends that range from $20,000 up to $80,000 for the year. The Institute wants to tackle big problems and offer big opportunities with practical approaches, RJI Associate Director Mike McKean explained. He said applications should describe projects that can be
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5 Takeaways on the State – and Future – of Journalism Education


This post is by Chris Roush from MediaShift


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Journalism and mass communication educators must learn new skills and adjust their teaching strategies to keep up with the industry’s rapid evolution — or risk becoming obsolete. That’s my conclusion after overseeing the publication of “Master Class: Teaching Advice for Journalism and Mass Communication Instructors,” a new book produced by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication standing committee on teaching, which I’ve chaired for the past four years. It’s no secret that journalism remains in a state of upheaval, with many media organizations struggling to find new, and profitable, business models that will sustain their operations. What often gets underplayed – or downright ignored – is how fast academia is adapting to those changes. “Master Class” addresses the issues facing today’s journalism instructors in a way that the last book on teaching in our field, which came out in 1992, would have never imagined.
Continue reading "5 Takeaways on the State – and Future – of Journalism Education"

How We Could Radically Rethink the Core Curriculum in Higher Education


This post is by Megan Fromm from MediaShift


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In the spirit of a new year, I’d like to propose a radical resolution for colleges and universities across America: ditch your general education requirements. At at time when so-called “soft skills” such as communication and problem-solving are in demand at major employers around the world, a new core curriculum represents the best chance for college-bound young adults to develop the intellect, attitudes and skills that will carry them into the future. This new liberal arts core would be one that is civic-minded, interdisciplinary, adaptative and integrates journalism and media at every opportunity and in every course. And we have to start now; we’re already behind the curve.

Why We Need a Liberal Arts Core Revision

General education requirements at most higher education institutions are emblematic of a system struggling to find its identity. Students often select from myriad courses to fulfill one area of the general core requirements,
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#EdShift Chat: Solutions Journalism in the Classroom


This post is by Amanda C. Bright from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It’s an age-old criticism of the press: it only reports on the problems; it only covers “bad news.” Sometimes, it comes in the form of parachuting into disastrous events and leaving when the rebuilding or healing begins. Other times, it is the reporting on a crime rate or environmental disaster or social ill that can leave readers without a sense of options or potential fixes. A response to this criticism is solutions journalism, which, as defined by the Solutions Journalism Network is “rigorous reporting on responses to social problems.” “We seek to rebalance the news, so that every day people are exposed to stories that help them understand problems and challenges, and stories that show potential ways to respond,” according to the SJN website. In this #EdShift Twitter chat, we will explore how the theory and practice of Solutions Journalism can be implemented into the J-School classroom, Continue reading "#EdShift Chat: Solutions Journalism in the Classroom"