Want to write for Publish.org? Every step of the process — from pitching to edits to payment — will be open

If you want to write for the new collaborative, public journalism site Publish.org, you should be open to showing your work. The Publish.org platform, which had been testing its backend and workflow with a smaller group of writers in closed beta over the past few months, opened up last week to all contributors — people who want to write, people who want to donate, people who want to review other people’s works-in-progress, or all of the above. How well the model will work ultimately depends on how active its contributors are willing to be, and the platform offers several avenues of participating. Anyone can register and write a piece, and then await public feedback from other Publish.org members (hello, Medium). The bulk of the work that appears on the site, however, will be through its public commissioning process, according to Publish.org editor Sarah Hartley. (Hartley,
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At this EU-supported online outlet for young Europeans, its readers are also its writers and translators

Twenty-four official languages are spoken in the European Union. Cafébabel dreams of a being a place that unites many of them. Its articles — most of which are available to read in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Polish, plus sometimes even more languages where relevant — inhabit a Europe where young Italians might care about a climate policy issue in Portugal, young Spaniards might be interested in an up-and-coming artist from Switzerland, and all young Europeans might care about the future protections of whistleblowers on a continental level. (Not Nigel Farage’s Europe, in other words.) Self-styled as an online “participatory” magazine, Cafébabel publishes stories about the intersection of life and culture and politics in six languages, powered mostly by communities of volunteer, unpaid writers, translators, photographers, and videographers across cities in Europe, and edited by a small central staff fluent in multiple languages in its Paris headquarters. (Though
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Netizen Report: Will Egypt’s Jailed Bloggers Ever See Justice?

Global Voices Advocacy’s Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world. On 19 October, Egypt’s highest court of appeal postponed the trial of prominent activist and blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah to 8 November. The 36-year-old father and husband was a leading voice in the 2011 protests that helped to overthrow former president Hosni Mubarak. Abd El Fattah is currently serving a five-year jail term for violating Egypt’s protest law, which prohibits public demonstrations without prior authorization by police. He has already served 3.5 years of his sentence. In Thursday’s hearing, the judge withdrew from Alaa’s case and referred it to another circuit. As the reason, he cited “embarrassment” without providing any further clarifications. Abd El Fattah is being prosecuted for taking part in a protest denouncing military trials of civilians in November 2013. Although several people were arrested
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Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)

“It feels to me as though America is becoming more European,” said Emily Bell, director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism. “It’s saying the not-for-profit sector has a real place in publishing, not just a sort of patch to get from here to the next profitable model. And then it’s asking, please, Europe, help us with the regulation.” This was in the middle of a free-wheeling discussion at Harvard Business School Friday, “The Future of Advertising and Publishing: Finding New Revenue Models for Journalism in the Digital Age.” The afternoon’s first panel was moderated by Bell and brought together Kinsey Wilson, digital strategist at The New York Times; David Carroll, associate professor of media design at The New School’s Parsons School of Design; and Nicco Mele, director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, for Continue reading "Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)"

EU’s Antitrust ‘War’ on Google and Facebook Uses Abandoned American Playbook

The casual observer could be forgiven for thinking European antitrust regulators have declared war on American tech giants. On June 27, the European Union imposed a €2.4 billion (US$2.75 billion) fine on Google for giving favorable treatment in its search results to its own comparison shopping service. And Germany’s antitrust enforcer is investigating Facebook for asking users to sign away control over personal information. In contrast, American antitrust enforcers have shown little interest in these companies. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) did open an investigation into whether Google has a search bias, but closed it in 2013, despite recognizing that it “may have had the effect of harming individual competitors.” Anti-Americanism, however, does not explain these starkly different approaches. Europe targets homegrown companies with the same ferocity. Last summer, for example, the EU fined a cartel of European truck-makers even more than it did Google. Instead, the
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Netizen Report: New Research Tests Facebook’s Digital ‘On Ramp’ for Developing Countries

Global Voices Advocacy’s Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world. This week Global Voices released an original research report on Free Basics, an app built by Facebook that is intended to serve as an “on ramp” to using the global internet. Now active in 63 countries across Africa, Asia and Latin America, the app does not get users onto the global internet, but rather gives them access to Facebook and a handful of online services, ranging from ESPN and Disney to BBC and Wikipedia, all free of charge. In their promotional materials for the program, Facebook posits that: “[by] introducing people to the benefits of the internet” they will help justify the cost of mobile data and thereby “bring more people online and help improve their lives.” A group of Global Voices contributors decided to test their theory this
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Monocle is printing a limited-run weekly newspaper in Italy, because why not (plus it made money)

What’s your go-to print newspaper to read while you take your long August vacation? In a completely consistent-with-the-brand move, Monocle is publishing and selling a 48-page weekly newspaper for four weeks in August, “a time of year when people have the luxury and time to read,” and when advertisers are looking to target Europeans on holiday, according to Monocle founder and editor-in-chief Tyler Brûlé. Each paper will consist of 48 pages — three full sections — of global news and opinion, as well as business, arts, culture, architecture and design, food, wine, fashion, and sports. It’ll be printed on high quality paper at the press of Italian publisher Athesia, located in a German-speaking region of Northern Italy (here’s a real photo of the city; enjoy). Monocle’s Summer Weekly is already a profitable project financed through advertising. You can preorder for shipping the four-week bundle for £45, and within
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