Want a calmer place to discover and discuss The Washington Post’s reporting? Try this Facebook group

Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold started reporting on President Trump’s charitable donation promises last summer, crowdsourcing names of charities from his Twitter followers and painstakingly recording in public the list of charities he’s called in an attempt to find some that Trump actually donates to. Interest in his work has decidedly risen: Fahrenthold now has 345,000 followers on Twitter and regular gig on CNN. “When he first started, Dave’s work wasn’t getting the audience it’s now getting. It took a while for people to recognize what he was doing,” Terri Rupar, digital editor for the Washington Post’s national desk, said. To reach an even broader audience, “what if we could use a network that already exists, using some of that network he’s built up?”

The Anne Frank Center Wants an Apology From Tim Allen For Comparing Hollywood to 1930s Germany

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect is condemning Tim Allen for a comment he made on Jimmy Kimmel Live! last week comparing Hollywood to Nazi Germany.  Allen attended President Donald Trump‘s inauguration and when host Jimmy Kimmel asked him about it, he got defensive. “I’m not attacking you,” said Kimmel. Allen responded, “You gotta be real careful around here, you know. You’ll get beat up if you don’t believe what everybody believes. It’s like ’30s Germany.” The Center posted on Facebook regarding Allen’s comments, demanding an apology. Steven Goldstein, the executive director asked, “Tim, have you lost your mind?” He elaborated, saying “No one in Hollywood today is subjecting you or anyone else to what the Nazis imposed on Jews in the 1930s.” Goldstein concluded, saying “It’s time for you to leave your bubble to apologize to the Jewish people and, to be sure, the Continue reading "The Anne Frank Center Wants an Apology From Tim Allen For Comparing Hollywood to 1930s Germany"

Must Reads in Media & Technology: March 21

Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
  1. This is Now What Happens When You Try to Post Fake News on Facebook (Nikhil Sonnad / Quartz)
2. ‘Who Shared It?’: How Americans Decide What News to Trust on Social Media (American Press Institute) 3. The WaPo-NYT Newspaper War That Wasn’t (David Uberti / Columbia Journalism Review)
  1. Propagate to Recut Cheddar’s Financial News for International Markets
    (Todd Spangler / Variety)
5. Apple’s Next Big Thing: Augmented Reality (Mark Gurman / Bloomberg)
  1. To Slow the Spread of False Stories on WhatsApp, this Colombian News Site is Enlisting its Own Readers (Carlos Serrano / Nieman Lab)
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Word up! This is the story behind The New York Times’ most famous tweet (which is 10 years old today)

In March 2007, New York Times developer Jacob Harris had some spare time and decided to create a Times account on a fledgling service that is today the preferred communication platform for the president of the United States. Harris set up @nytimes and wrote the code that powered it in an afternoon. “Using twitter’s APIs, I was able to get headlines from the New York Times feeds to my cell phone with only an idle afternoon and a few lines of Ruby,” he wrote later. The account ran off an RSS feed of the Times’ top stories, tweeting out just the headlines. By the middle of March, it had accrued all of 72 followers, most of whom were either Harris’s friends or other developers.

Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it

From new mottos to television advertising campaigns, news organizations are refocusing efforts on why their readers should trust them. But new research suggests they should also focus on who their “ambassadors” are: The main factor in determining a reader’s trust in an article appears to be who shared it, not the news organization that published it, according to a study out Monday from The Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. People say that the news organization matters to them a lot, and a 2016 study by the Media Insight Project found that Americans said the original news source was the biggest “cue” they used to help determine whether they trusted the content in an article they found on Facebook. “We wanted to test whether that was really true, or whether people just believed that was Continue reading "Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it"

Netizen Report: Azerbaijani Bloggers Targeted with Legal Threats, Spearphishing

Global Voices Advocacy’s Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world. Azerbaijani video blogger Mehman Huseynov was sentenced to two years in prison on charges of slander over videos he shared on his Facebook page. His page, where he covers a range of topics including working conditions and the wealth of government officials, has more than 300,000 followers. Arresting, silencing, and intimidating journalists, bloggers, and activists is par for the course in Azerbaijan these days, but Huseynov is the first blogger or journalist to be officially sentenced for slander by a court in Azerbaijan. Prior cases of journalists or bloggers being sentenced typically involved charges like narcotics possession (often bogus), hooliganism, abuse of power, and tax evasion. Targeted surveillance of human rights advocates also appears to be increasingly common. New reports and technical research confirm that multiple advocates in
Russia - Kremlin
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Must Reads in Media & Technology: March 20

Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
1. Inside Hearst’s Turbulent Quest to Build a Snapchat Brand (Jessica Schiffer / Digiday)

3. Fake Times (Jordan Crook / Tech Crunch)
5. ‘Truth’ is Diluted When Publishers Chase Scale (Chris Sutcliffe / The Media Briefing)
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