Outgoing 21st Century Fox CEO James Murdoch Reportedly Set to Replace Elon Musk as Tesla Chair

James Murdoch, who will soon be stepping down as chief executive of 21st Century Fox, is the favorite to succeed Elon Musk as chairman of the board for Tesla. According to the Financial Times, “two people briefed on the discussions said Mr. Murdoch, who is currently a non-executive director of Tesla, was the lead candidate for the job.” Musk agreed to step down as chairman for at least three years as part of a settlement with the SEC, and paid a hefty $20 million fine stemming from allegations he violated securities laws after tweeting about having secured funds necessary to take Telsa private in late August. FT additionally reported, citing people familiar with the discussions, that Murdoch “had signaled Continue reading "Outgoing 21st Century Fox CEO James Murdoch Reportedly Set to Replace Elon Musk as Tesla Chair"

Here’s what the Financial Times is doing to get bossy man voice out of (okay, less prominent in) its opinion section

It’s fun to hate on newspapers’ op-ed sections (inspiring debate is kind of the point), meaning the job of editing them is not for the faint-hearted. And changing and diversifying them can be a challenge — whether you’re battling bad-faith arguments from the alt-right or just trying to get rid of a strain of [deep, booming, obviously male voice] “I want to tell you about Middle East policy.” The deep, booming “I want to tell you about Middle East policy” had been the problem with the Financial Times’ opinion section, but Brooke Masters is up to the challenge of fixing it. At the FT for more than a decade, she was the companies editor before becoming opinion and analysis editor this past spring. Her role — diversifying the 130-year-old paper’s opinion section, previously known as “Comment” and dominated by opining men — is just a piece of what the Continue reading "Here’s what the Financial Times is doing to get bossy man voice out of (okay, less prominent in) its opinion section"

“If the Financial Times were a person, it would be a man.” Here’s how the paper is trying to change that.

Most newspapers are men. The manliest of all, perhaps — at least, after The Wall Street Journal — is the Financial Times. And for a long time, no one really thought that was a problem. But then, for Reneé Kaplan, it was. Kaplan, hired about three years ago as the FT’s first-ever head of audience engagement, quickly tasked a data team with figuring out exactly who was subscribing to the FT. Overwhelmingly, it was men: As of two years ago, 80 percent of the FT’s subscribers were male. Not only that: Women found the FT’s tone off-putting and were disengaged from its content. And when they were asked, in focus groups, to describe who the paper would be if it were a person, they said to a woman: It would be a man. But Kaplan is on a mission for readers to think of the 130-year-old FT as Continue reading "“If the Financial Times were a person, it would be a man.” Here’s how the paper is trying to change that."

The Financial Times is giving high-schoolers around the world free access to FT.com

The Financial Times is giving 16- to 19-year-olds enrolled in high schools around the world free access to FT.com, the company announced Monday, extending a program that had previously been available to students in the U.K. “We hope to emulate the success of the U.K. schools initiative which has resulted in over 1,400 secondary schools and colleges and over 13,000 students gaining free access to FT content,” Caspar de Bono, the FT’s B2B managing director, said in a statement. The process isn’t automatic. High schools can register their interest here and will be contacted with more details. The program is aimed specifically at high schools where the oldest students are 19; “If an education institution has a mix of ages above and below 19, then please contact us, as we can offer mixed solutions — where the under 19’s gain free access and there are discounted Continue reading "The Financial Times is giving high-schoolers around the world free access to FT.com"

3 Ways to Use Customer Research In Newsroom Decision-Making

Many newsroom analytics deal with quantitative data — pageviews, time on page, retention, etc — and find meaning by looking at these numbers at scale and over time. And while quantitative is excellent at explaining what is happening, it cannot necessarily explain why something is happening. Customer research — in the shape of interviews, focus groups and surveys — is an important tool to deepen your understanding of your audience and learn about their motivations, habits, and relationship to your content. At the Financial Times, we use both types of information regularly in our newsroom to improve our understanding of a particular audiences and to develop specific strategies to grow reach and loyalty. Here we want to share three times we’ve used customer research to make better decisions around editorial, product and audience development. The lessons we learned doing this work aren’t unique to the FT, though — there are
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