Facebook will let publishers convert Instant Articles to Google AMP and Apple News formats

Facebook said Thursday that it’s making it easier for publishers to export stories formatted for Instant Articles to Google’s AMP and Apple News as well. The announcement comes as Facebook continues to try to woo publishers to the Instant Articles format; many have cooled on it, citing business pressures and technical restraints. Facebook’s software development kit now lets publishers export stories to the AMP format, Facebook partner engineering director Piyush Mangalick wrote in Facebook’s announcement. Support for Apple News will “be available in the coming weeks.” “The updated SDK transforms the markup publishers use to create Instant Articles to generate the code needed to build these other formats, removing what we’ve heard can be a resource-heavy step in publishing on multiple platforms,” Mangalick wrote. “With an easy way to get from one markup format to another, publishers can then plug-and-play the markup in their content management systems or Continue reading "Facebook will let publishers convert Instant Articles to Google AMP and Apple News formats"

How Publishers Fought Back by Touting ‘Brand Safety’ at NewFronts

The following piece is a guest post from Jessica Rovello, the CEO and co-founder of Arkadium, which provides interactive content to brands and publishers. Guest posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication. Read more about MediaShift guest posts here. YouTube and Facebook’s recent ad missteps were on full display at this year’s NewFronts. Publishers looked poised — and eager — to exploit the platforms’ gaffes in a bid to illustrate brand-safety and credibility (especially in the era of fake news), and ultimately lure back advertiser dollars. The event also served as a showcase for the industry to show how it plans to successfully navigate content development and innovation. As always, household names in media flexed their creative muscles and showed advertisers what they have on deck for the coming year. Some outlets — including The New York Times, BuzzFeed, Refinery29, Time and many more — made
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Who’s really driving traffic to articles? Depends on the subject: Facebook (lifestyle, entertainment) or Google (tech, business, sports)

When you’re publishing to Facebook, or tweaking a headline to align with some carefully honed SEO strategy, how closely do you take note of story topic? New research from Parse.ly suggests that news organizations trying to make the most of Facebook referrals and Google search traffic need to be extra discerning about story topic, as some — like lifestyle or entertainment — see the majority of their referral traffic coming from Facebook, while others — like tech, sports, and business — see the lion’s share of their traffic coming through Google search. (The findings were based on Parse.ly’s analysis of more than 10 million articles published last year by outlets within its network.) Lifestyle articles, for instance, get more than 87 percent of their external traffic from Facebook, and just 7 percent from Google search. (63 percent of that traffic also came from a mobile device.)
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The French election is over. What’s next for the Google- and Facebook-backed fact-checking effort there?

The two-round French presidential election ended yesterday, with centrist Emmanuel Macron beating the far-right Marine Le Pen by a nearly 2-to-1 margin. What probably won’t end with the election, though, is the collective, infinite screams of “fake news” and finger pointing from all sides. (The Paris prosecutor’s office saidon Thursday it was opening a probe into whether fake news stories were being spread in order to influence voters in Sunday’s election. Spoiler alert: They were.) CrossCheck, the France-wide, bilingual fact-checking collaboration with 37 newsroom partners checking (and cross-checking for each other) audience questions, is wrapping up its 10-week sprint after debunking around 60 reader-submitted questionable stories (it received around 500 questions total through its submission form). Throughout the process, CrossCheck accumulated a lot of data on reader reactions and social engagement, and it’s now figuring out how to conduct useful research based on what it’s collected, Claire
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Big Ideas From BEA 2017 on Podcasting, Live Streaming, Google Tools

Educators and professionals who attended the Broadcast Education Association’s annual convention last month failed the “what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas” test. Even before boarding their flight home, educators jotted down lesson plans for the waning weeks of the semester and started experimenting with new apps or software to try and master over the summer. If you missed the conference, here’s a recap of some of BEA’s big ideas.

Podcasting & Audio

“If you do not teach podcasting 101, you need to get there,” said Jason Norris, founder and owner of OntheGo.FM. Podcasting can find a place in many journalism classrooms without a lot of training for faculty or additional expenses for schools. The tools (recording apps and editing software) are cheap and accessible. Panelists varied on their responses for editing software, but most agreed that the free program Audacity served as a starter before advancing to Adobe
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Big Ideas From BEA 2017 on Podcasting, Live Streaming, Google Tools

Educators and professionals who attended the Broadcast Education Association’s annual convention last month failed the “what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas” test. Even before boarding their flight home, educators jotted down lesson plans for the waning weeks of the semester and started experimenting with new apps or software to try and master over the summer. If you missed the conference, here’s a recap of some of BEA’s big ideas.

Podcasting & Audio

“If you do not teach podcasting 101, you need to get there,” said Jason Norris, founder and owner of OntheGo.FM. Podcasting can find a place in many journalism classrooms without a lot of training for faculty or additional expenses for schools. The tools (recording apps and editing software) are cheap and accessible. Panelists varied on their responses for editing software, but most agreed that the free program Audacity served as a starter before advancing to Adobe
Continue reading "Big Ideas From BEA 2017 on Podcasting, Live Streaming, Google Tools"

Here are some takeaways from Electionland, a 1,000-person effort covering Election Day voting issues

Let’s relive Tuesday, November 8, 2016 again. Not the presidential election — the Electionland project, spearheaded by ProPublica, and an monumental effort from more than a thousand journalists and students monitoring, verifying, and writing about Election Day voting problems across the country. What went well, and what processes and tools aided in successful reporting? What would it take to replicate Electionland, covering other events, perhaps in other countries? A comprehensive new report debriefing the Electionland initiative released Thursday at the Collaborative Journalism Summit at Montclair State University examines every step in the collaboration, from the selection of newsroom partners, to the legwork done before Election Day itself, to the technical effort that went into setting up social verification and communication tools, to the physical layout of the Electionland newsroom hosted at CUNY, to a post mortem on the voting issues captured and stories written at the end of it all.
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