Harvard Class of 2003 Uses Alumni Notes to Shame Classmate Jared Kushner

The Harvard class of 2003 is making itself quite plain that it does not want to be associated with its former classmate, First Son-in-Law Jared Kushner. Once every five years, as has been done since the 19th century, Harvard alumni write class notes informally referred to as the Red Book to keep in touch with one another. The Red Book consists of big life updates, such as work, marriages, and children. In this year’s Red Book for the class of 2003 – 15 years after graduation – these updates are interspersed with attacks on Kushner, the Boston Globe reports. “Shame on you, Jared Kushner,’’ one classmate named Sophia Macris allegedly wrote. “I, for one, am actually glad that our Class of ’03 finally has a real, live fascist among us. Who says Harvard isn’t diverse?” wrote Jon Sherman, another classmate. According to the Globe, the aim, in Continue reading "Harvard Class of 2003 Uses Alumni Notes to Shame Classmate Jared Kushner"

Media and Journalism Awards: Dec. 7 Edition

Here’s a list of current media and journalism awards, including deadlines for applying. If we’re missing any major awards, please contact Mark Glaser at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org, and we’ll add them to the list. Any featured awards are paid sponsorships. Award descriptions are excerpts, edited for length and clarity.

Featured Awards

The Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting
The Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting, awarded by Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, honors journalism that best promotes more effective and ethical conduct of government, the making of public policy, or the practice of politics. Open to newspapers, magazines, broadcast media and online news organizations. Entries must be stories that have made an impact on public policy in the United States at the national, regional, or local level. The winner receives $25,000, and five finalists receive $10,000. Enter online now.
Deadline: December 29, 2017

The Livingston Continue reading "Media and Journalism Awards: Dec. 7 Edition"

Media and Journalism Fellowships: Nov. 22 Edition

Here’s a list of current media and journalism fellowship programs, including the deadlines for applying. If we’re missing any major programs, or you would like your program to be in the featured fellowship slot, please let us know by contacting Mark Glaser at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org and we’ll add them to the list. All featured fellowships are paid promotional slots. Fellowship descriptions are excerpts, edited for length and clarity.
   

DECEMBER 2017 DEADLINES

Nieman-Berkman Klein Fellowship in Journalism Innovation
The Nieman-Berkman Klein Fellowship in Journalism Innovation brings individuals to Harvard University to work on a specific course of research or a specific project relating to journalism innovation.
Deadline: Dec. 1, 2017 for International Journalists; Jan. 31, 2018 for American Journalists Scripps Howard Foundation Fellowship
The Scripps Howard Foundation is taking applications for its 12-month fellowship program, offered in conjunction with the Scripps News Washington Bureau/Newsy and ProPublica. Continue reading "Media and Journalism Fellowships: Nov. 22 Edition"

When fake news is funny (or “funny”), is it harder to get people to stop sharing it?

Psychology says: Facebook factchecks don’t work very well. New research from Yale’s Gordon Pennycook and David Rand (they of the memorable “bullshit receptivity” research) found that Facebook’s “disputed” labels are likely to backfire in many cases. Brendan Nyhan writes up some of their recent work for The New York Times and brings in his own Dartmouth research:
Mr. Pennycook and Mr. Rand find that the presence of “disputed” labels causes study participants to rate unlabeled false stories as slightly more accurate — an “implied truth” effect. If Facebook is seen as taking responsibility for the accuracy of information in its news feed through labeling, readers could start assuming that unlabeled stories have survived scrutiny from fact checkers (which is rarely correct — there are far too many for humans to check everything). Encouragingly, my students at Dartmouth College and I find that the effects of Facebook-style “disputed” banners on Continue reading "When fake news is funny (or “funny”), is it harder to get people to stop sharing it?"

Majority of Fox News’ Trump Coverage Has Been Negative According to Harvard Media Study

fox_news_logo1-300x198 Over the past couple of weeks, Fox News has really amped up the outrage over mainstream media bias when covering President Donald Trump. With the White House being bombarded with bombshell after bombshell, Fox has tended to both ignore much of the bad news and complain about others outlets’ coverage. This decision appears to have hurt the bottom line, as ratings have sunk for the network, especially in prime time. However, amidst all the objections and media criticism, one thing may be lost on the FNC commentators and pundits doing the complaining — their network’s own coverage has been mostly negative. A new report from Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy on Trump’s first 100 days in office showed that, indeed, the vast majority of coverage of the president had had a negative tone. In fact, when analyzing the news stories published in major
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Continue reading "Majority of Fox News’ Trump Coverage Has Been Negative According to Harvard Media Study"

Harvard Students Claim Donald Trump is More Threatening Than ISIS

It’s no secret that Harvard is pretty left-leaning, and recently, students launched an anti-President Donald Trump “resistance school.” The school will be a four-week course in “progressive activism,” according to a report from CBS. Campus Reform, a blog which, according to its website, aims to expose “bias and abuse on the nation’s college campuses,” decided to go up to the school and check it out. They say that students at Harvard “Consistently cite the ‘danger’ posed by President Trump, and claim to feel ‘threatened’ by his policies.” Campus Reform decided to find out just how threatening they think he is by asking a bunch of students who they think is more dangerous: Donald Trump or ISIS? Overwhelmingly, the students selected for the video picked Trump. One student said he doesn’t feel terrorism is “that big of a deal.” Others said that Trump’s policies will affect their lives more than Continue reading "Harvard Students Claim Donald Trump is More Threatening Than ISIS"

Starbucks Will Give You Free Coffee if You’re Willing to be Nice to People

starbucks Talking to someone on the other side of the aisle is not always easy. Something everyone can get behind, however, is a free cup of coffee, and Starbucks is willing to give you one if you engage in civil discourse. According to the Boston Globe, the coffee chain has teamed up with Harvard startup Hi from the Other Side, an app that aims to help liberals and conservatives find common ground by matching them up. All you have to do is sign up for the app via Facebook, and you’ll be matched with someone on the opposite side of the political spectrum. You’ll each get half of the information you need to unlock the gift card and you’ll have to work together to figure out the rest. Once you do, the coffee is yours. After President Donald Trump signed an executive order that would have restricted travel from seven predominately Muslim Continue reading "Starbucks Will Give You Free Coffee if You’re Willing to be Nice to People"