HuffPost reshapes its commitment in India as mobile Internet use continues to skyrocket


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




On the heels of the AOL-Verizon-Oath amalgamation, HuffPost will soon end its partnership with India’s largest media conglomerate and forge its own path with an independent HuffPost India edition. It’s one of many U.S.-based news organizations trying to seize the still-rising Indian media market, but now HuffPost is attempting to break out of the herd. “This was a place where we felt like we wanted to invest and to go in a different direction. We very much plan to remain in India as a publisher and continue to do journalism here. We plan to expand our team here,” HuffPost editor-in-chief Lydia Polgreen emphasized to Livemint, the website of Indian business publication Mint. She also noted that more than 50 percent of HuffPost’s audience is outside of the United States. HuffPost had partnered with India’s Times Group, the publisher of the highest-circulation English-language newspaper in Continue reading "HuffPost reshapes its commitment in India as mobile Internet use continues to skyrocket"

India’s digital future isn’t just in English: BBC launches 4 Indian language services


This post is by Hasit Shah from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The BBC World Service has announced the creation of four new Indian language services, as part of its biggest global expansion in more than 70 years. Delhi will become the BBC’s largest bureau outside the U.K. and the BBC will consolidate its position as the biggest foreign news organization in India. The new language services — Gujarati, Telugu, Marathi and Punjabi — have a combined potential reach of 250 million people in India (and also Pakistan, as well as the large diaspora). (In addition to the Indian language services, the BBC announced seven other new language services: Igbo, Pidgin, and Yoruba in Nigeria; Amharic, Oromo, and Tigrinya in Ethiopia and Eritrea; and Korean.) The BBC is trying to achieve a global audience of 500 million by 2022 — the year of its centenary — and in that context, it makes sense for it to focus on a country Continue reading "India’s digital future isn’t just in English: BBC launches 4 Indian language services"

Home game: India’s digital media startups are aiming to outcompete Western news companies


This post is by Hasit Shah from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As India’s digital media market continues to grow, there’s been a lot of attention paid to the American companies who have set up operations in the country — BuzzFeed, The Huffington Post, Quartz, and others have been slowly expanding since their arrival in the last couple of years. It’s not easy to do well there. But some of the most successful homegrown Indian digital startups, while not as well known in the U.S., have enjoyed far more impressive growth than their foreign competitors and are now showing clear signs of becoming mature media companies. India has an estimated 300 million Internet users and, although digital advertising there is relatively low in value, it has plenty of room to grow.

ScoopWhoop: Following the BuzzFeed model

ScoopWhoop appeared at the end of 2013 and at first looked like a clone of BuzzFeed. Everything from the style to Continue reading "Home game: India’s digital media startups are aiming to outcompete Western news companies"

From Nieman Reports: Why news outlets are watching India’s next billion Internet users


This post is by Hasit Shah from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Editor’s note: Our sister publication Nieman Reports is out with its new issue. There’s lots to read, but Nieman Lab readers might be particularly interested in this story, by former Nieman-Berkman Fellow Hasit Shah, on the evolving landscape for digital media in India.

Every morning, Mr. and Mrs. Singh gently shoo their dog away from the freshly delivered copies of The Times of India and the Hindustan Times, two of India’s oldest and most popular English-language newspapers, and settle down to read Continue reading "From Nieman Reports: Why news outlets are watching India’s next billion Internet users"

Cheap smartphones, low bandwidth, and a billion people: Where is India’s news headed?


This post is by Caroline O'Donovan from Nieman Journalism Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We’re approaching the end of the Nieman Fellowship year — a natural time for fellows to reflect on what they’ve learned. Nieman-Berkman Fellow Hasit Shah of the BBC gave a talk yesterday on the research he’s done during his year here at Harvard. Hasit’s interested in the digitization of India, and how news consumption patterns and behaviors there are rapidly developing. Here’s a video of his talk: He presented conflicting portraits of India. On the one hand, there are 1 billion people in India without Internet access, 300 million without electricity, and the same number of illiterate citizens. At the same time, 100 million people there are on Facebook, 30 million are on Twitter and 50 million use WhatsApp. It’s a dichotomy he said was well captured in this clip: On top of that, Indian digital media consumers still mostly rely on very low bandwidth, sub-par smartphone technology. And oh, they speak over 20 languages. “I came to Harvard with skepticism and pessimism about India’s prospects,” he said. “You look at that and think, How is it possible for people to be hooked up to the Internet when those basic development indices are being fixed so slowly?” There is some innovation happening in the Indian market, he acknowledged, pointing to companies like Storypick and ScoopWhoop. “There isn’t a lot that’s visible in terms of people designing news services for that non-English speaking, low literacy, low attention span, low bandwidth audience — which is massive as a business opportunity, but also if you believe in journalism as a social good,” he says. Hasit says he wants to spend more time developing an ethnographic study of the wants and needs of the Indian news audience. For example, messaging apps are a very popular way of communicating in India: “Chat apps are the primary mode of communication between friends and acquaintances,” he says. Messaging apps function as social networks, and news companies like the BBC are already taking advantage of them for the distribution of news. Understanding how and why Indians use these platforms is essential to understanding how a new product would best work. He did float one prototype for a newsy comic book that would offer useful information in a simple presentation. Comic books are a commonly used tool to teach children Indian cultural history, he says, and graphic novels are popular with adults. His idea would mimic that visual approach, but instead for current events and other information. He also suggested an audio supplement might be included for those who cannot read, as well as a template that would allow users to create their own content.