Remix: 10 Great Apps for Journalism

Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

The ad was launched in 2009 to promote the iPhone. It was simple and catchy: “If you want to check snow conditions on the mountain, there’s an app for that.”
“If you want to check how many calories are in your lunch, there’s an app for that.”
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“And if you want to check exactly where you parked the car, there’s even an app for that, too.” “Yup, there’s an app for just about everything.” Seven years later, there in fact is an app for just about everything. The challenge is finding what apps are right for you and your students.
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Selling subscriptions through Apple is getting better for publishers — but also for everyone else

Monday is Apple’s big day for software announcements at its annual WWDC conference, but we got an early peek at one of them at The Verge and Daring Fireball today — and it’s one that’ll be of interest to publishers. The Verge’s Lauren Goode:
In a rare pre-WWDC sit-down interview with the The Verge, Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing, said that Apple would soon alter its revenue-sharing model for apps. While the well-known 70/30 split will remain, developers who are able to maintain a subscription with a customer longer than a year will see Apple’s cut drop down to 15 percent. The option to sell subscriptions will also be available to all developers instead of just a few kinds of apps. “Now we’re going to open up to all categories,” Schiller says, “and that includes games, which is a huge category.”
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Reuters TV finds value not just in making its content free, but in giving it away to other publishers

In a little less than a year, Reuters has completely changed the strategy around its news video product, Reuters TV. It’s gone from charging for its iOS app to not just giving its content away for free across many platforms, but also letting other publishers use that content on their own sites and in their own apps. That strategy is paying off in terms of recognition — Apple calls the Reuters TV app one of its “essentials” — and uptake. reuters tv appWhen Reuters TV was first launched as an iPhone app last February (don’t confuse this with the Reuters TV YouTube channel, by the way, which was launched in 2012 but no longer exists), it had a paywall: $1.99 a month, with limited ads. The app lets users choose how long they have to watch — anywhere from 5 to 30 minutes — and then creates a program of news
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Classrooms As Homes For Creative, Engaged Research

This article was written in collaboration with Susan Jacobson and Jacqueline Marino.

It had been years since Alexa Jane used markers, tape, scissors and pens to make something. Today, though, she and others are taking to cardstock and paper, taping and drawing to discuss the next generation of mobile news. “I prefer to have the hands-on,” says Jane, a Digital Media Studies major at Florida International University’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication. “It’s easier to illustrate this way what we like instead of using text.”
Audience Analysis undergraduate students at Florida International University pilot a session of paper prototyping for funded research into audience interest in long-form multimedia journalism.

Audience Analysis undergraduate students at Florida International University pilot a session of paper prototyping for funded research into audience interest in long-form multimedia journalism. by Robert Gutsche, Jr.

Jane and her team construct screens and designs for interactive graphics to insert into a folder with a spot cut to the actual size of an iPhone 6 Plus. By cutting and pasting text and
A cut-out of an iPhone 6 Plus takes center stage in prototyping where students use paper to create new features and screens for a web-based long-form project that they redesign for mobile use.
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As part of funded research from the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute, researchers use eyetracking to examine audience interactions with long-form journalism. Video courtesy of Tobii.
Paper prototyping in a course on Audience Analysis introduces students to issues and challenges of funded research, qualitative methods, and cultural approaches to media studies.
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Mediatwits #177: Tablet News Apps Stagnate as Smartphone Apps Boom

Earlier this month, Canada’s Postmedia Network announced they were going to shutter the evening tablet editions at the Ottawa Citizen, Montreal Gazette and Calgary Herald. Tablets were one part of Postmedia’s “four platform strategy” that it started in 2014 which also included its smartphone app, website and print edition. When it was first announced the tablet edition was targeted at middle-aged readers who wanted to read the paper after dinner: “With interactive graphics, animation, embedded video and audio, the digital magazine will provide new dimensions to the news reading experience.” But that strategy ran into a bit of a speed bump in the form of low readership on tablets. You’ve got to wonder if smartphone adoption – especially the bigger screens on recent phones – has affected the use of tablets. Here in the U.S. 68 percent of adults now have a smartphone compared to 45

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Press Publish 16: Jason Kint on how worried publishers should be about the arrival of adblockers on mobile

It’s Episode 16 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! press-publish-2-1400pxMy guest today is Jason Kint. Jason is CEO of Digital Content Next, which I confess I liked better under its old name, the Online Publishers Association. It’s the trade organization representing most of the country’s largest online publishers. I wanted to talk to Jason because this week marks the release of iOS 9 and with it the debut of ad blocking on the iPhone. Ad blockers have existed on desktop for years, of course, but they’ve mostly been a niche interest. On your phone, though, the appeal is obvious — faster loads, lower data use, fewer annoyances. And as I record this, iOS 9 has been out for about 24 hours, and the No. 1, No. 4, and No. 6 paid apps on the App Store are ad blockers. So publishers are about to see Continue reading "Press Publish 16: Jason Kint on how worried publishers should be about the arrival of adblockers on mobile"

iOS 9: How news organizations are updating their apps for Apple’s new operating system

Apple opened up iOS 9 to everyone for download on Wednesday. Most of the attention is going to ad blocking (and, yep, the No. 1 paid app in the App Store today is an ad blocker), but publishers are also updating their apps for the new operating system, and will continue to do in coming days. (The new version of the Apple Watch operating system, watchOS 2, had also been expected Wednesday, but it’s been delayed.) First, of course, there’s the new News app, which takes the place of Newsstand (your news apps are set free, floating free on your home screen). Apple News, installed by default with iOS 9, is a Flipboard-like news reader that lets participating publishers distribute their content directly on Apple devices. Any publisher can sign
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