Vox’s video about the Chechen leader accused of torturing gay people is being spammed with dislikes

In its first few hours online, Vox’s video on current leader of Chechnya Ramzan Kadyrov — under whose rule a vicious anti-gay pogrom has begun — performed like a usual Vox video on YouTube. The typical likes-to-dislikes ratio for a Vox video is 10:1, but between 2 to 3 p.m. on Thursday, the producer of the video Mac Schneider noticed the likes to dislikes ratio on the Ramzan Kadyrov video had tipped to 1:1 (as of noon on Friday, the video had 8,453 likes and 4,703 dislikes), Vox’s executive producer Joe Posner told me in an email explaining the timeline. Around this time, there was a spike in traffic to the video from Russia. Vox also received a privacy complaint via YouTube’s
Continue reading "Vox’s video about the Chechen leader accused of torturing gay people is being spammed with dislikes"

The Times (of London) is expanding from digital to print (in Ireland)

The Times of London is expanding its Irish edition from digital into print, a move that bucks against a continued trend of declining daily print sales in the country and elsewhere. The Times launched its digital-only Ireland edition in September 2015 (after a failed legal challenge from the Irish Times to block News UK from using the name “The Times Irish Edition”). It has a substantial newsroom of around 30 reporters. Its new print edition will replace the international print version of The Times that’s currently available there; readers can pick up the first print copies June 3. News Ireland has not disclosed pricing for the print edition; the current digital edition costs new subscribers €1 for a 30-day trial, and then €5 a week thereafter. “We have built a loyal digital audience for the Ireland edition of The Times and we are now delighted to expand what we offer Continue reading "The Times (of London) is expanding from digital to print (in Ireland)"

Who’s really driving traffic to articles? Depends on the subject: Facebook (lifestyle, entertainment) or Google (tech, business, sports)

When you’re publishing to Facebook, or tweaking a headline to align with some carefully honed SEO strategy, how closely do you take note of story topic? New research from Parse.ly suggests that news organizations trying to make the most of Facebook referrals and Google search traffic need to be extra discerning about story topic, as some — like lifestyle or entertainment — see the majority of their referral traffic coming from Facebook, while others — like tech, sports, and business — see the lion’s share of their traffic coming through Google search. (The findings were based on Parse.ly’s analysis of more than 10 million articles published last year by outlets within its network.) Lifestyle articles, for instance, get more than 87 percent of their external traffic from Facebook, and just 7 percent from Google search. (63 percent of that traffic also came from a mobile device.)
Continue reading "Who’s really driving traffic to articles? Depends on the subject: Facebook (lifestyle, entertainment) or Google (tech, business, sports)"

This contest is looking for more ideas on innovation ways to present factchecks (grand prize: $10,000)

If most fact-checking as it’s presented to readers today bores you, now’s your chance to figure out more exciting formats — and maybe win a big cash prize doing it. The International Center for Journalists is running a contest called TruthBuzz that seeks ideas to make fact-checking and debunking stories more appealing to readers, and to increase their chances of going viral. From the contest description:
We want your creative solutions for taking fact-checking beyond long-form explanations and bullet points. We’re looking for ideas — from everyone, not just journalists — that turn fact-checking into engaging, visual and interactive stories that are instantly understandable and shareable. A successful entry to TruthBuzz will refute or clarify a false or misleading report or statement in an engaging, entertaining way that convinces audiences of its veracity and encourages them to share it.
Any digital format in any language is welcome, from individuals or Continue reading "This contest is looking for more ideas on innovation ways to present factchecks (grand prize: $10,000)"

A small survey suggests chasing pageviews isn’t putting as much pressure on watchdog reporting as you might think (or fear)

When it comes to metrics and measurement, digital publishing has brought both the good and the bad. While news organizations are now able to see, with increasingly accuracy and depth, exactly which stories resonate with readers, metrics have also taken an outsize role in determining which stories reporters are encouraged to chase. That’s often bad news for important investigative stories that are unlikely to draw big audiences. The effect, however, might be less significant than many assume, according to a small study. Paul D’Ambrosio, director of news and investigations at New Jersey’s Asbury Park Press, recently polled almost 100 reporters (many of them active in IRE and NICAR) to study the relationship between metrics pressures and watchdog journalism across newsrooms. The results? Metrics matter, but less than you might think. Nearly 54 percent of reporters agree or strongly agreed with the notion that watchdog stories do well, metrics-wise. Only Continue reading "A small survey suggests chasing pageviews isn’t putting as much pressure on watchdog reporting as you might think (or fear)"

3 things BuzzFeed News thinks about before sending a push alert

Earlier this month, President Donald Trump met Australian prime minister Malcolm Turnbull in New York. While the big story in the U.S. that day was the passage of the Republican healthcare bill in the House of Representatives, the meeting was major news in Australia. As a result, BuzzFeed News decided to send an alert to its app users who have chosen to follow Australia news in its news app. The alert read: “There were some delays, but Malcolm Turnbull and Donald Trump finally met in person. Here’s how it went down. 👴🏻 ❤️ 👴🏻 ” Yes, it included the emoji, which has purposefully become a hallmark of the BuzzFeed News app, Brianne O’Brien, the lead news curation editor at BuzzFeed’s London office said on a panel at the ONA Dublin conference on Friday. After BuzzFeed launched its news app in 2015, two-thirds of the downloads were from
Continue reading "3 things BuzzFeed News thinks about before sending a push alert"

More European newspapers are charging for content online (but there are differences by country)

“A lot of people in the market are talking about paywalls or free traffic very much from an angle from what is right and what is wrong. Sometimes people think there is only one strategy: theirs,” Christian Röpke, the CEO of German newsweekly Die Zeit’s online presence Zeit Online, recently told my colleague Joseph Lichterman. As Zeit Online tries to attract a younger audience that might ultimately pay for its product, it’s trying a number of different strategies, from live events to new types of editorial content. Die Zeit just launched a new metered paywall in March, and it certainly isn’t alone: Though their strategies vary, European publishers are moving away from offering all of their content online for free, according to a factsheet released Wednesday by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. The factsheet looks at the different kinds of paid content (freemium, metered paywalls, hard paywalls)
Continue reading "More European newspapers are charging for content online (but there are differences by country)"