Younger generations are actually better at telling news from opinion than those over age 50


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Those pesky kids with their smartphones don’t know the days of print newspapers separating the news pages from the opinion section. But they’re not necessarily the ones we have to worry about discerning news statements from opinions, according to a new analysis from the Pew Research Center. Based on a survey Pew conducted in February and March, Americans ages 18–49 were more likely to accurately categorize factual statements as facts and opinion statements as opinions. A third of that age range correctly identified all five news items in a test, compared to 20 percent of those over age 50, and 44 percent of the younger grouping correctly identified all opinion items, compared to 26 percent of their elders. (You can test your own ability here, no matter your age.) “Beyond digital savviness, the original study found that two other factors have a strong relationship with being able to
Continue reading "Younger generations are actually better at telling news from opinion than those over age 50"

Americans feel they can best distinguish news from opinion in local TV news; worst, online news sites and social media


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Only 43 percent of Americans find it easy to distinguish opinion from news on digital news sites or social media, according to a survey from the American Press Institute. But the job gets easier when they’re consuming media from publications they’re most familiar with. Earlier this year, API asked Americans about their relationship with the news media, polling both the public about journalists and journalists about the public. (A separate study from Pew Research earlier this month found that 57 percent of American social media users expect the news on social media to be inaccurate.) Building off that work, API pulled out these stats about sorting opinion and news on different platforms:

This program made people better at identifying disinformation. (They still weren’t great at knowing what to trust.)


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The success of media literacy programs is often described in terms of number of people reached, rather than by how (or if) they actually change people’s behavior in the long run. It’s not even clear what metrics to judge them on. But a new report from a media literacy course run in Ukraine suggests that the program actually was able to change participants’ behavior — even 18 months after they’d completed the course. The program was called Learn to Discern (L2D); it was run by global development and education nonprofit IREX with funding from the Canadian government and support from local organizations Academy of Ukrainian Press and StopFake (which Nieman Lab covered four years ago). First, the raw numbers: IREX says that its L2D seminars “reached more than 15,000 people of all ages and professional backgrounds” through a “train the trainers” model, in which 361 community leaders were trained
Continue reading "This program made people better at identifying disinformation. (They still weren’t great at knowing what to trust.)"

Beyond just “literate,” how can you help news consumers be “news fluent”?


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




News literacy is so last decade: Journalists and audiences need to focus on news fluency now, suggests a report from the American Press Institute. “Literacy suggests someone is either capable or incapable of performing a task — in the same way one either can or cannot read. That doesn’t aptly describe what is going on with news. People consume news constantly, even at an early age. The issue is whether they recognize the characteristics of good reporting — such as thoroughness, good sourcing, strong evidence, the difference between hearsay and eyewitness evidence and more,” argue API exectuvie director Tom Rosentiel and accountability journalism program director Jane Elizabeth. “The metaphor of fluency, by contrast, describes the process of mastering something you can already do. Fluency also is something you can accomplish on your own, through conscious effort.” That effort, they say, is the responsibility of both news producers and consumers, Continue reading "Beyond just “literate,” how can you help news consumers be “news fluent”?"

Teaching Media Literacy With A Cape After SXSWEdu


This post is by Jonathan Rogers from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Before I attended danah boyd’s campfire discussion at SXSWEdu on Media Literacy, I had been promoting it heavily with the hashtags #savetheworld #teachmedialit. In her talk, however, boyd strongly questioned the notion of media literacy’s ability to save the world.  Slowly tucking my cape back into my bag, I walked out of the keynote unsettled, which was probably her point. Some of the old school methods, as boyd pointed out at SXSWEdu, may not be effective against the new “weaponized digital media,” trolls, bots and online political forces with millions of dollars behind them. She has concerns about the good will and the truth that many bloggers are sending out over the internet.  She sees neo-nazis and other extremists filling the new digital media with mirrors of truth, hate and evil. In a post-modern way, I believe she also argues whether or not the truth can be found
Continue reading "Teaching Media Literacy With A Cape After SXSWEdu"

Macro-Resistance: How to Detox a Polluted Public Sphere


This post is by Stephen J. A. Ward from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This is the second in a two-part series. You can read the first part here. Despite the creative media unleashed by our digital revolution, there is increasing evidence that our public sphere is polluted, corrupted. Corrupted in its capacity to discern truth from falsity, sincere reporters from manipulative voices, experts from ideologues, facts from uninformed assertion. It is nasty out there. The internet we once praised for its “democratization” of media and for making possible “we the public” is now a raucous, often dangerous global sphere of trolls, hackers, racists, fanatics, conspiracy theorists, and robotic manipulation of social media by governments. All of this is happening in an apparent era of science, of easily accessible information, of massive collections of data, and hundreds of universities and centers for factual, reasonable discourse. We inhabit a virtual world of wall-to-wall opinion; a democracy seemingly without facts. Firm belief in facts coexists with
Continue reading "Macro-Resistance: How to Detox a Polluted Public Sphere"

The latest class of Knight Prototype projects will tackle trust, media literacy, and yes, fake news


This post is by Ricardo Bilton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Knight Foundation is throwing some real money at the fake news problem and its related issues. The Knight Prototype Fund, which shells out up to $50,000 to developers of early-stage media projects, announced a round of 20 new initiatives, all of which are addressing in some way ongoing concerns about trust in news (including the fake kind), media literacy, and factchecking. Frederic Filloux, cofounder of Monday Note, will lead the News Quality Score Project, a tool that will find and quantify the signals of quality news. Filloux said back in April that the project had completed a collection of 640,000 articles from 500 of the largest American websites. In a similar vein, Veracity.ai, aimed at advertisers, will try to combat fake news’ financial incentives by developing an updating list of fake news sites. Hoaxy Bot-o-Meter is another notable project. Its creators at Indiana University Bloomington’s Center for Complex Continue reading "The latest class of Knight Prototype projects will tackle trust, media literacy, and yes, fake news"

What Universities Can Do About Digital Literacy in the Age of Fake News


This post is by Tom Kelleher from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




You would know the difference between a “real” news story and a story written for or by an advertiser, right? Especially when a story is labeled “advertisement” right there at the top of your screen. Even if that label was something murkier like “BrandVoice” and pushed down to the bottom of the story, most of us would recognize sponsored content as advertising, right? A few years ago, noting that $3.2 billion had been spent on native advertising in 2014, two University of Georgia researchers set out to take a closer look into what happens in our minds when we see native ads. Bart Wojdynski and Nate Evans defined native advertising as “any paid advertising that takes the specific form and appearance of editorial content from the publisher itself.” In a fairly straightforward experiment, Wojdynski and Evans started with a news story about advances in lithium ion auto batteries Continue reading "What Universities Can Do About Digital Literacy in the Age of Fake News"

Australia’s kid-focused newspaper Crinkling News wants to teach media literacy to young readers


This post is by Ricardo Bilton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Saffron Howden knew she was on the right track with Crinkling News, her Australian kid-focused weekly newspaper, within a few days of Donald Trump being elected. Even among Australian schoolchildren, there was a lot of trepidation about the implications of a Donald Trump presidency. One school introduced art therapy to help kids process their emotions. The uncertainty that kids felt in November — much of which persists among both the young and not-so-young — underscored Howden’s initial motivation a year ago to create a newspaper written for the country’s young news consumers, ages 7 to 15. The world can be a scary place, she argues, and the country’s largest media companies were doing a poor job of explaining things in a way that kids could understand. “I was hearing a lot of stories from parents about how their kids really wanted to read the newspaper, but the parents felt like
Continue reading "Australia’s kid-focused newspaper Crinkling News wants to teach media literacy to young readers"

News and media literacy the way it’s always been taught may not be the right response to fake news woes


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fake news and news literacy and community engagement sometimes feel like new topics — and especially urgent ones, given nightmare-come-to-life incidents like Pizzagate. But many people, including plenty in academia, have been plugging away at this line of work since well before Facebook had a fake news PR situation on its hands, before Pizzagate, before the 2016 U.S. election, before Facebook passed a billion active users. Emerson College professor Paul Mihailidis, whose research covers topics like how young people consume information online and how people can use different forms of media to improve their communities, runs a new graduate program where students embed with partner organizations to develop concrete media projects that address specific problems that arise in local communities. “In doing civic media work, the first misconception is the thinking that a tool or a curriculum will necessarily solve anything. Students will jump to solutions before Continue reading "News and media literacy the way it’s always been taught may not be the right response to fake news woes"

Uma “Wikipédia de verificação de factos” para ajudar a dar contexto


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Pode não ser tarde de mais para uma pequena correcção no rumo da maneira como todos consumimos e avaliamos (ou não) a informação num ambiente digital. Mas incluir alguma diversidade ideológica nas “dietas mediáticas” dos leitores está longe de ser um remédio milagroso para o problema da desinformação e das “câmaras de eco” parciais que dividem a sociedade em realidades isoladas. “A ideia de que para chegarmos à verdade basta, por exemplo, ler apenas o Breitbart e depois o Truthout, e que de alguma forma vamos chegar à verdade, é uma ideia um pouco bizarra”, disse Mike Caulfied, quando lhe falei de amigos que, na sequência das eleições norte-americanas, tentam “equilibrar” a “parcialidade de esquerda” nos meios de comunicação que consomem. Caulfied, que é director de educação combinada e em rede na Washington State University Vancouver, tem trabalhado nos últimos meses num projecto-piloto de uma wiki de
Continue reading "Uma “Wikipédia de verificação de factos” para ajudar a dar contexto"

The Dangers of Fake News Spread to Data Visualization


This post is by Russell Chun from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fake news stories defined our 2016 election and continue to threaten the social media ecosystem, our lives, and even international diplomacy. Already, the issue has prompted changes in business and sharing practices for Facebook and Google. But despite organizational initiatives to battle the problem, it’s likely to get worse in 2017. Why? For the most part, fake news stories are still relatively crude and unsophisticated, with nothing more than text, a photo grabbed off the internet, and hyper-partisan, attention-grabbing headlines to lure clicks and shares. But fake news creators might begin to include one thing that journalists and researchers already know works to increase engagement: data visualizations.

Readers Believe Data Visualizations

The mere inclusion of a simple data visualization, like a chart or map, has shown to significantly increase a story’s believability, whether true or not. Researchers from Cornell University tested readers with two articles on a scientific claim,
Continue reading "The Dangers of Fake News Spread to Data Visualization"

Is Fake News a Solvable Problem?


This post is by Bianca Fortis from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The real first step to solving the fake news problem is to accept that it can never be fully eliminated, said a group of media experts who debated the issue last week at an event hosted by the New York Daily News Innovation Lab in New York City. “There will always be people who refuse to believe we landed on the moon,” said Jane Elizabeth, senior manager at the American Press Institute. The event was structured as a debate with two teams of three panelists on each side. One team sought to prove that fake news can be solved. The other team, jokingly referred to as “the pessimists” by moderator and NYC Media Lab Executive Director Justin Hendrix, sought to prove fake news will live on forever.

‘A Symptom of a Diseased Industry’

Fake news has always existed, only by other names – urban legends, conspiracy theories or propaganda, according to
Continue reading "Is Fake News a Solvable Problem?"

Must Reads in Media & Technology: Feb. 10


This post is by Bianca Fortis from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
1. Flush From its Trump-Bump, ProPublica is Staffing Up to Cover the President (Benjamin Mullin / Poynter)2. People Are Okay at Remembering Where They Get News Online (But Still Think Facebook’s a News Outlet) (Laura Hazard Owen / NiemanLab) 3. With $1.1 Million in Funding From Knight, OpenNews is Becoming an Independent Organization (Joseph Lichterman / NiemanLab) 4. The Washington Post Rolls Out New Customizable Content Ad Unit (Lucia Moses / Digiday) 5. News Publisher Attn is Crowdsourcing Facebook Live Coverage (Sahil Patel / Digiday) 6. Sportswriter Fired for Anti-Trump Tweet Sues New York Post (Blair Kerkhoff / Kansas City Star)

Get the Daily Must Reads in Your Inbox!



The post Must Reads in Media & Technology: Feb. 10 appeared first on MediaShift.

Librarians in Seattle Are Teaching Little Kids To Identify Fake News


This post is by Lindsey Ellefson from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fake news is a major issue. No, we don’t mean the sorts of reporting that the President often conflates with “fake news.” CNN is not fake news. Poor poll numbers are not fake news. Fake news is exactly what it sounds like: it’s made-up fiction that is designed to get clicks and revenue by preying on those who simply don’t realize that they’re reading nonsense. That’s where these librarians in Seattle come in. They recognize how serious the fake news problem is, so they’re arming their kids with the tools to identify it. According to the Seattle Times, librarians like Lakeside School’s Janelle Hagen are “equipping students to fight through lies, distortion and trickery to find their way to Continue reading "Librarians in Seattle Are Teaching Little Kids To Identify Fake News"

Must Reads in Media & Technology: Jan. 6


This post is by Kelly O'Mara from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.

1. Why Medium Failed to Disrupt the Media (Leonid Bershidsky / Bloomberg View)

  1. Did Media Literacy Backfire? (Danah Boyd / Data & Society: Points)

  2. Local News Could See a Windfall From the FCC’s Spectrum Auction (Joseph Lichterman / Nieman Lab)

4. Newspaper Endorsements Are Imperiled for the Same Reasons They’re Now Urgently Needed (Danny Funt / CJR)

  1. ‘Facebook Live’ Torture Video Raises Ethical Questions for Social Media Giant (Dylan Byers / CNN Money)

6. Journalists Don’t Have to Be Sidelined From Community Involvement (Steve Buttry / Current)

 

Get the Daily Must Reads in Your Inbox!



The post Must Reads in Media & Technology: Jan. 6 appeared first on MediaShift.

Upcoming Events in Digital Media: Nov. 9 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift posts an ongoing list of upcoming events in the digital media and journalism world. These will be a mix of MediaShift-produced events and other events. If we’re missing any major events, or you’d like to pay to promote your event in the “featured event” spot of our weekly post, please contact Mark Glaser at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org. Any non-MediaShift events in the “featured event” slot are paid placements. Also, be sure to sign up for our events email newsletter to get notifications about future MediaShift events.

NOVEMBER 2015

2015 ICFJ Awards
Nov. 10, 2015
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, Washington, D.C.
The International Center for Journalists we will honor the achievements of four colleagues whose outstanding coverage has made a huge impact: Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, photojournalist Lynsey Addario, Cuban blogger Yoani Sánchez, and Indian investigative journalist Priyanka Dubey.
More information Continue reading "Upcoming Events in Digital Media: Nov. 9 Edition"

Upcoming Events in Digital Media: Nov. 2 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift posts an ongoing list of upcoming events in the digital media and journalism world. These will be a mix of MediaShift-produced events and other events. If we’re missing any major events, or you’d like to pay to promote your event in the “featured event” spot of our weekly post, please contact Mark Glaser at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org. Any non-MediaShift events in the “featured event” slot are paid placements. Also, be sure to sign up for our events email newsletter to get notifications about future MediaShift events.

NOVEMBER 2015

Media Literacy Week
Nov. 2-6, 2015
Media Literacy Week is designed to bring attention and visibility to media literacy education in the United States. Inspired by Canada’s Media Literacy Week, now in its 10th year, the National Association for Media Literacy Education is leading the efforts to create a media literacy week in the United States Continue reading "Upcoming Events in Digital Media: Nov. 2 Edition"

Upcoming Events in Digital Media: Oct. 26 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift posts an ongoing list of upcoming events in the digital media and journalism world. These will be a mix of MediaShift-produced events and other events. If we’re missing any major events, or you’d like to pay to promote your event in the “featured event” spot of our weekly post, please contact Mark Glaser at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org. Any non-MediaShift events in the “featured event” slot are paid placements. Also, be sure to sign up for our events email newsletter to get notifications about future MediaShift events.

FEATURED EVENT

Mobile Me & You
Learn more about mobile media best practices from 20 experts at the Mobile Me & You conference at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Oct. 28-30. The free conference, funded by the Knight Foundation, will feature experts from the Washington Post, McClatchy Newspapers, Univision, Al Jazeera, NBC Digital Group, Pew Research Center, Archrival advertising agency Continue reading "Upcoming Events in Digital Media: Oct. 26 Edition"