The number of Americans who get news from mobile has nearly tripled since 2013

The use of mobile phones for news now far outpaces the use of desktops and laptops for news — and that’s a big change over just the past two years, according to a factsheet released by the Pew Research Center on Tuesday. The above chart refers to Americans who “often” get news from mobile or desktop/laptop, but 96 percent of Americans ever get news “online” (i.e. from a mobile device or computer). Pew also offers up some other, not-super-surprising stats about who’s most likely to get news from mobile: young people, people of color, and Democrats (who also tend to be younger and less white). And “those with more formal education and higher incomes are more likely to get news on both mobile and desktop or laptop. Those with a college degree are more likely to often get news on mobile than those without a college degree (66 percent
Continue reading "The number of Americans who get news from mobile has nearly tripled since 2013"

Russian Dressing On Everything

Reporting on the Russia investigation is not for the faint of heart. This week, a look at how a journalist became entangled in the investigation when she turned her source over to the FBI. Plus, how another reporter avoided common journalistic mistakes during the Iraq War and a conversation with the director of the new documentary The Other Side of Everything about the end of Yugoslavia.
  1. Tom Nichols [@RadioFreeTom], professor of national security at the Naval War College, on separating the signal from the noise in stories about Trump's relations with RussiaListen.

  2. Marcy Wheeler [@emptywheel], national security blogger, on her decision to out a source to the FBIListen.

  3. Jonathan Landay [@JonathanLanday], national security correspondent at Reuters, on his reporting at the outset of the Iraq WarListen.

4. Mila Turajlić, director of "The Other Side of Everything," on her mother's dissent against the former Yugoslavian governmentListen.

Blame It On The Alcohol

This week, we devote an entire hour to what one important scholar deemed “the cause of and solution to all of life’s problems.” From its earliest role as a source of nourishment to its depictions in ancient literature, we examine the roots of mankind’s everlasting drinking problems. Plus, how a bizarre 60 Minutes piece spread the idea that red wine has medicinal effects. Then, a look at how popular culture has incorrectly framed Alcoholics Anonymous as the best and only option for addiction recovery. And, a scientist cooks up a synthetic substitute for booze. 1. Iain Gately, author of Drink: A Cultural History of Alcohol, on the ancient origins of our core beliefs about booze. Listen. 2. Robert Taylor, assistant managing editor at Wine Spectator, on red wine's constantly changing reputation as a healthy substance. Listen.
  1. Gabrielle Glaser [@GabrielleGlaser], author of Her Best-Kept Secret: Why Women Continue reading "Blame It On The Alcohol"

Polite Oppression

Following a string of landmark Supreme Court rulings and a surprise retirement, this week On the Media examines the conservative culture on the bench and wonders what we can expect from the court going forward. Plus, is civility really dead or only sleeping? And what is the view from small-town America?
  1. Adam Serwer [@AdamSerwer], senior editor at The Atlantic, on the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the Trump administration's travel ban decision. Listen.

  2. Teresa Bejan [@tmbejan], professor of political theory at the University of Oxford, on the historical origins of our "crisis of civility." Listen.

  3. Keith Bybee, professor of judiciary studies at Syracuse University, on the oft-repeated deaths of American civility — and how notions of civility can be a tool of oppression. Listen.

  4. Deborah Fallows, author and linguist, and James Fallows [@JamesFallows], national correspondent at The Atlantic, on the societies thriving outside the media lens. Listen.

Cable News Responded to the Debate Over Political Civility By Arranging a Bunch of Fights

Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) started a political firestorm when she suggested that people will and should continue to harass Trump Administration officials when they’re out in public – at a Red Hen restaurant, for example. In light of these events, cable news reporters and pundits called for civility and respect for each other’s views. So what did they do? Officiated and participated in a host of segments fighting over civility and respect for each other’s views. Oh, the delectable irony! More than that, people started getting snippy with each other — and that was likely by design. Liberals were invited on conservatively-inclined shows and vice versa. And notably incendiary figures like Anthony Scaramucci and Antonio Sabato Jr. were brought in to give their two cents. Here are just a few: A Fox News Panel Goes At It Over Civility Double Standards
Fox News’ Neil Cavuto, and Democratic strategist Continue reading "Cable News Responded to the Debate Over Political Civility By Arranging a Bunch of Fights"

Chaos Agents

Family separation, a re-framed immigration debate and Trump's misleading executive order: why news fatigue about the border isn’t an option. This week, we explore multiple sides of the asylum policy — including the view from Central America. Plus, a look back at US repatriation policy in the 1930's, and six decades of American culture wars. 
  1. Dara Lind [@DLind] and Dahlia Lithwick [@Dahlialithwick] on how Trump's family separation policy attempts to re-frame the immigration debate, and why news fatigue isn't an option. Listen.
  2. Carlos Dada [@CarlosDada] on the way the family separation and zero-tolerance asylum policy are changing the way Central Americans see the United States. Listen.

3. Francisco Balderrama on the mass expulsion of Mexican immigrants and their American-born children from the United States during the Great Depression. Listen.

  1. Brian Lehrer [@BrianLehrer] on six decades of culture wars Continue reading "Chaos Agents"

The Rise and Fall of Elizabeth Holmes

In 2014, Fortune magazine ran a cover story featuring Elizabeth Holmes: a blonde woman wearing a black turtleneck, staring deadpan at the camera, with the headline “This CEO’s out for blood.” A decade earlier, Holmes had founded Theranos, a company promising to “revolutionize” the blood testing industry, initially using a microfluidics approach -- moving from deep vein draws to a single drop of blood. It promised easier, cheaper, more accessible lab tests -- and a revolutionized healthcare experience. But it turns out that those promises were just that. There was no revolutionary new way to test blood. This spring she settled a lawsuit with the securities and exchange commission (though admitting no wrongdoing) and last Friday, another nail in the coffin for Theranos in the form of federal charges which were filed against Holmes and the company's former president.  The alleged crimes were uncovered by the dogged reporting Continue reading "The Rise and Fall of Elizabeth Holmes"