Morning Joe Gives Andrea Mitchell a Round of Applause for 40 Years at NBC

On Morning Joe on Wednesday the cast and crew gave NBC veteran Andrea Mitchell a brief round of applause welcoming her to the show today and in celebration of her forty years as a journalist for NBC News. Over the past week, a number of NBC shows have welcomed Mitchell as a guest and congratulated her on her tenure, including Meet the Press, Today, and Velshi & Ruhle, but the most comprehensive was the video released during Mitchell’s own show, celebrating her career. On Morning Joe, Mika Brzezinski noted that Andrea is on duty many hours a day, and mentioned a recent InStyle profile
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The Center Folds

Socialism is having a moment in the sunlight — that is, on daytime television. Yet at the same time that the left earns a closer look from political pundits, Democrats and Republicans still fail to understand each other with nuance. Plus, after newspaper layoffs and a White House lockout this week, we assess the press’s appetite for solidarity. 
  1. Nathan Robinson [@NathanJRobinson], editor-in-chief at Current Affairs, on socialism's renewed place in mainstream political discourse. Listen.
  2. Perry Bacon Jr. [@perrybaconjr], political writer at FiveThirtyEight, on the misconceptions Democrats and Republicans have about each otherListen.

  3. Pete Vernon [@byPeteVernon], writer at the Columbia Journalism Review, on the White House's decision this week to bar a CNN reporter from a press event. Listen.

4. Chelsia Rose Marcius [@chelsiamarchius], former staff reporter at the New York Daily News, Tom Laforgia [@thomaslaforgia], former Continue reading "The Center Folds"

Blah Blah Blah… BANG

In a matter of months, we've moved from bipartisan immigration talks to calls to abolish ICE. On this week’s On the Media, a look at how leftists are employing a right-wing communications strategy in order to change the national debate. Plus, thirty years into the conversation on global warming, what have we really learned? And in the days following the Trump-Putin summit, what did we miss? 
  1. Brooke on this week's coverage of the Trump-Putin summit, and on a new metaphor for the Trump era: the Shepard toneListen. 

  2. Joseph Lehman, president of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy; Laura Marsh [@lmlauramarsh], literary editor at The New Republic; and Sean McElwee [@SeanMcElwee], activist and contributor at The Nation, on the Overton WindowListen. 

  3. Andrew Revkin [@Revkin] of the National Geographic Society on thirty years of global warming coverageListen. 

The number of Americans who get news from mobile has nearly tripled since 2013

The use of mobile phones for news now far outpaces the use of desktops and laptops for news — and that’s a big change over just the past two years, according to a factsheet released by the Pew Research Center on Tuesday. The above chart refers to Americans who “often” get news from mobile or desktop/laptop, but 96 percent of Americans ever get news “online” (i.e. from a mobile device or computer). Pew also offers up some other, not-super-surprising stats about who’s most likely to get news from mobile: young people, people of color, and Democrats (who also tend to be younger and less white). And “those with more formal education and higher incomes are more likely to get news on both mobile and desktop or laptop. Those with a college degree are more likely to often get news on mobile than those without a college degree (66 percent
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Russian Dressing On Everything

Reporting on the Russia investigation is not for the faint of heart. This week, a look at how a journalist became entangled in the investigation when she turned her source over to the FBI. Plus, how another reporter avoided common journalistic mistakes during the Iraq War and a conversation with the director of the new documentary The Other Side of Everything about the end of Yugoslavia.
  1. Tom Nichols [@RadioFreeTom], professor of national security at the Naval War College, on separating the signal from the noise in stories about Trump's relations with RussiaListen.

  2. Marcy Wheeler [@emptywheel], national security blogger, on her decision to out a source to the FBIListen.

  3. Jonathan Landay [@JonathanLanday], national security correspondent at Reuters, on his reporting at the outset of the Iraq WarListen.

4. Mila Turajlić, director of "The Other Side of Everything," on her mother's dissent against the former Yugoslavian governmentListen.

Blame It On The Alcohol

This week, we devote an entire hour to what one important scholar deemed “the cause of and solution to all of life’s problems.” From its earliest role as a source of nourishment to its depictions in ancient literature, we examine the roots of mankind’s everlasting drinking problems. Plus, how a bizarre 60 Minutes piece spread the idea that red wine has medicinal effects. Then, a look at how popular culture has incorrectly framed Alcoholics Anonymous as the best and only option for addiction recovery. And, a scientist cooks up a synthetic substitute for booze. 1. Iain Gately, author of Drink: A Cultural History of Alcohol, on the ancient origins of our core beliefs about booze. Listen. 2. Robert Taylor, assistant managing editor at Wine Spectator, on red wine's constantly changing reputation as a healthy substance. Listen.
  1. Gabrielle Glaser [@GabrielleGlaser], author of Her Best-Kept Secret: Why Women Continue reading "Blame It On The Alcohol"

Polite Oppression

Following a string of landmark Supreme Court rulings and a surprise retirement, this week On the Media examines the conservative culture on the bench and wonders what we can expect from the court going forward. Plus, is civility really dead or only sleeping? And what is the view from small-town America?
  1. Adam Serwer [@AdamSerwer], senior editor at The Atlantic, on the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the Trump administration's travel ban decision. Listen.

  2. Teresa Bejan [@tmbejan], professor of political theory at the University of Oxford, on the historical origins of our "crisis of civility." Listen.

  3. Keith Bybee, professor of judiciary studies at Syracuse University, on the oft-repeated deaths of American civility — and how notions of civility can be a tool of oppression. Listen.

  4. Deborah Fallows, author and linguist, and James Fallows [@JamesFallows], national correspondent at The Atlantic, on the societies thriving outside the media lens. Listen.