When a link to a news story comes shows the source of the story, some people end up trusting it less

People don’t always remember the precise source of their news. Pew Research found in a recent study that Americans could come up with a publisher behind a news story they’d clicked on only 56 percent of the time. (And that’s assuming they were remembering the source correctly, which the study had no way to check.) But people actually seem to trust news articles they click into less when the stories come labeled with the news outlet that published it. That’s especially true with certain outlets, including Vox, Fox News, and Breitbart News. (As my colleague Laura Hazard Owen asked in her coverage of a previous Knight study analyzing people’s perceptions of bias, do people know what Vox does? Are they confusing it with Fox? Are they familiar with Breitbart News?) That’s the finding from more than 3,000 U.S. adults who looked at and rated the trustworthiness (on
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News n00bs: The quest for new audiences has taken The Washington Post to the streaming platform Twitch

Twitch: It’s not just for Fortnight battle royales anymore. The Washington Post tried out broadcasting on the streaming platform best known for gaming yesterday with content related to politics — which is its own battle royale, really. The Post’s plans for the platform include “postgame” coverage of major news events hosted by political reporter Libby Casey and a series called Playing Games with Politicians, in which political reporter Dave Weigel will interview politicians while playing video games. On Monday, the Post streamed coverage of Donald Trump’s meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin. Twitch — which is owned by Amazon, whose CEO Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post — can be thought of as a cross between YouTube and a Reddit AMA. Accounts host live video feeds of content (usually video games) and viewers speak to each other in a chat feature. (If anyone’s actually watching.) It has 15
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Wilson FM, which aims to “elevate podcast aesthetics,” is the first exciting podcast app in a long while

So there’s this new podcast app-doohickey that came out last week that really caught my eye. It’s called Wilson FM — a name I will forever associate with a volleyball (I’M SORRY, WILSON) — and the thing is billing itself as a “podcast magazine,” which on most days would be a piece of nomenclature that I’d find vaguely annoying. Except that a podcast magazine is exactly what Wilson FM is, and it’s also one of the more pleasurable player ideas I’ve seen in a long while. The core mechanic isn’t anything particularly revolutionary, other than the fact that it’s remarkably simple. Every week, the app-magazine-thing serves you a new curated playlist of podcast episodes built around a different theme (most of the time). There’s one about art, there’s another about the Supreme Court, and then there’s a collection that’s really just threading together Lea Thau’s Love Hurts series.
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Dog-eared MP3s: The podcast and book publishing industries are finding new ways to cross-pollinate

Audible has long been a horizontal curiosity for the podcast industry, given its hiring of former NPR programming VP Eric Nuzum in mid-2015 and subsequent rollout of the Audible Originals and “Channels” strategy in mid-2016, which saw the company release products that some, like myself, perceived as comparable to and competitive with the kinds of products you’d get from the podcast ecosystem. This signing of authors like Lewis to audiobook-first deals appears to be a ramping up of an alternate original programming strategy, one that sees Audible leaning more heavily into the preexisting nature of its core relationships with the book publishing industry and the book-buying audience. It might also be a consequence of a reshuffle at the executive decision-making level: In late 2017, the Hollywood Reporter broke the news that chief content officer Andrew Gaies and chief revenue officer Will Lopes had unexpectedly stepped down resigned from their posts.
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Amazon Prime Day is the bad-news-free news event we’ve been waiting for this summer

Amazon Prime Day. A day where clicking to refresh is fun, not panic-inducing. Where the only surprises are good ones. Where 3 p.m. marks not a one-hour warning until market close and news dumps, but JUST THE BEGINNING OF 36 HOURS OF AMAZING BARGAINS. It’s July 16 and instead of staring at The New York Times’ jittery election needle I’m staring at the Times-owned Wirecutter’s constantly updating Prime Day deals page. Outside, the Trump-Putin meeting continues and children remain separated from their parents and the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings are still coming. And European Amazon workers are striking, but inside I am ordering a budget portable hammock and ecologically sound beach toys and a Crayola 60th Anniversary 64 Count Crayon Set with Collectible Tin and Vitamin C serum and a berry keeper and a tiny car vacuum and who even knows what the rest of the day will bring,
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A new proposed law would turn drone journalism into a swarm of lawsuits and make it easy to sue over news photography

It’s a crisp autumn day and the news director has asked for drone video of fall colors. You know just the place: a rise aside a subdivision that borders a state park whose oaks and sugar maples are a riot of colors. You take off and, with camera pointed forward, fly a conservative 80 feet above 13 of the subdivision’s homes en route to the state park. The combination of homes in the foreground and a wall of fall color in the background makes a great composition. And, if one semi-official group gets its way, it also exposes you to at least 13 civil suits for trespassing. And more legal exposure capturing video of those 13 houses. In 1946, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that the airspace above us belonged to the federal government. A 1962 court decision affirmed that federal law pre-empted local laws when it came to Continue reading "A new proposed law would turn drone journalism into a swarm of lawsuits and make it easy to sue over news photography"

Three multi-billion-dollar companies dominate the Chinese internet landscape, from news media to AI

Internet penetration in China is at around just under 56 percent, according to a report released this year by the Chinese internet administrative agency CNNIC, which means there were around 772 million internet users in the country as of last December (and 753 million mobile internet users). These numbers have surely only grown since. (China’s still well below the U.S.’s internet penetration of 89 percent, though China’s connected population is well over twice the entire population of the U.S.) A new China Internet Report out this week was compiled jointly by 500 Startups, the South China Morning Post (SCMP), and SCMP’s China tech site Abacus, and it offers fresher numbers illustrating the reach and ambition of Chinese tech companies, the aggressive influence of the Chinese government, and the behaviors and preferences of Chinese internet (well, let’s just basically say mobile phone) users.
China-U.S. key players
Shortform video apps
Toutiao and Tencent for news
Internet penetration in rural areas of China
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