Are news publishers directly liable for embedding tweets that contain images not created by that tweeter?

News publishers will now be thinking twice before embedding in articles a certain viral tweet that contains a “full color image” of Tom Brady and Danny Ainge, taken in 2016. In fact, any publisher embedding any tweets containing content that might not be original to the tweeter now has at least some reason to be concerned. On Thursday night, a New York federal judge ruled that simply embedding certain tweets can constitute a copyright violation by news publishers. The judge wrote (via The Hollywood Reporter):
Having carefully considered the embedding issue, this Court concludes, for the reasons discussed below, that when defendants caused the embedded Tweets to appear on their websites, their actions violated plaintiff’s exclusive display right; the fact that the image was hosted on a server owned and operated by an unrelated third party (Twitter) does not shield them from this result.
The photo in question, taken Continue reading "Are news publishers directly liable for embedding tweets that contain images not created by that tweeter?"

What strategies work best for increasing trust in local newsrooms? Trusting News has some ideas

After six months of investigating thousands of disciplinary cases in dozens of police departments around Cincinnati, Scripps TV station WCPO was almost ready to share its findings on air and online. But the team decided to add one more thing to their to-do list: an on-air segment and online letter about why and how they did it. “Our motives are simple: We want to make sure the people who protect us and enforce our laws are worthy of the high level of trust the public gives them,” wrote Mike Canan, then WCPO.com’s editor. “Our goal is to show you if police departments are transparent about how they respond to findings of misconduct, if the punishment fits the behavior, and what can be done to provide a better system of checks and balances that benefit police — and our community,” explained Craig Cheatham, the station’s chief investigative reporter, Continue reading "What strategies work best for increasing trust in local newsrooms? Trusting News has some ideas"

Should we consider fake news another form of (not particularly effective) political persuasion — or something more dangerous?

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

“Most forms of political persuasion seem to have little effect at all.” Dartmouth’s Brendan Nyhan writes in The New York Times that it isn’t that easy to change people’s votes in an election, in an Upshot post titled “Fake news and bots may be worrisome, but their political power is overblown.” When we’re trying to evaluate “claims about vast persuasion effects from dubious online content,” Nyhan writes, we should actually be looking at three things: 1) How many people actually saw the material; 2) Whether the people exposed are persuadable/swing voters; and 3) the percentage of bogus news as a percentage of all news viewed.

The Guardian’s new podcast player for the web tries to make listening a little more interactive (but not interruptive)

Sometimes, the podcast isn’t enough. Or to put it differently, it’s so good you want to find out even more. While binging on the S-Town podcast last year, the first thing I did after one episode was search the Internet for more about the central character John McLemore, in hopes of finding a picture of the hedge maze via the GPS coordinates McLemore started giving out. (If you haven’t listened to S-Town and plan to, don’t do this.) So did the Guardian Mobile Innovation Lab team — an impulse that they guessed many podcast listeners shared. The Lab’s latest mobile experiment is an attempt to address some of the small inconveniences and limitations of the podcast listening experience as it stands today. It’s a podcast player designed for the mobile web, which is being tested first with a new Guardian podcast called Strange Bird, hosted by data editor
Continue reading "The Guardian’s new podcast player for the web tries to make listening a little more interactive (but not interruptive)"

Connecting reporters with experts, Sciline wants to improve the quality of today’s science reporting

If you believe the experts, regularly eating dark chocolate can help lower your blood pressure, make you smarter, and help you lose weight. Also, say the experts: Chocolate can contribute to obesity and diabetes and cause acid reflux. Confusion over the health benefits of foods like chocolate, conditions like autism, and scientific phenomena like global warming is sometimes a product of bad scientific research, but it can also be a product of bad science reporting. Journalists, particularly those who don’t specialize in the subject, just may not understand either the science they’re writing about, and that confusion can creep into their reporting and affect readers’ understanding. Those readers can then spread that misunderstanding to others. Turning that around is the mission behind Sciline, a new nonprofit that’s trying to improve the quality of science reporting by making it easier for reporters to connect with experts who can Continue reading "Connecting reporters with experts, Sciline wants to improve the quality of today’s science reporting"

Comfortable in its first language, this German business publisher hopes to build a global audience off its English edition

Every so often, an English-language news publisher tries to set up shop in Germany. Or a German news publisher tries its hand at an English-language edition. Both directions are difficult. On its road to internationalization, the business and finance-focused German outlet Handelsblatt has seen the slimmed-down English-language edition efforts of other German news outlets. The sticking point, according to Andreas Kluth, who is leading Handelsblatt’s English-language efforts, is the same for everyone: translation. “I feel like a pastor giving speeches sometimes, but I’ve banned the word ‘translation.’ Translation never works: We adapt, remix, splice, turn upside-down, and we do our own stories even without recourse to our German colleagues. And when we lay out the English version of German stories on our site, they’re new articles loosely based on the German articles,” Kluth said. “There’s a completely different tradition for the structure of a story — lede,
Continue reading "Comfortable in its first language, this German business publisher hopes to build a global audience off its English edition"

Facebook’s Campbell Brown: “This is not about us trying to make everybody happy”

Campbell Brown, who heads Facebook’s news partnerships team, and Adam Mosseri, Facebook VP of News Feed, took the stage at Recode’s Code Media conference Monday to discuss, oh, the company that we all think about all the time now. A few key bits from the Recode panel: Campbell Brown: Facebook is “having a point of view and leaning into quality news…taking a step to try to define what quality news looks like, and give that a boost.” This will be done partly through much-discussed crowdsourced rankings. Mosseri insisted “it’s not about being objective or subjective; it’s about where we have values and where we are clear about them and how we pursue them, and, obviously, debating that.” This sounds…subjective? But “we’re never gonna weigh in, for instance, on one ideological view over another or one political view over another.” He also said that “what
👌🏾
Continue reading "Facebook’s Campbell Brown: “This is not about us trying to make everybody happy”"