Welcome to GDPR: Here are the data privacy notices publishers are showing their Europe-based readers

Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation laws are now in effect, and we’re getting a sense of what publishers have decided to implement on their websites as of May 25 — whether they’ve decided to block European Union and European Economic Area-based traffic outright, set up buckets of consent for readers to click through, or something simpler. (Or nothing new at all.) Publishers have had two years to prepare, but the government regulations still appeared to catch some off-guard. GDPR is intended to give people within the EU control over their personal data, but the way it’s structured is a headache for news organizations and other online entities that have used visitors’ data for years. GDPR’s principles may also put the dissemination of information online at risk, as Amy Webb argued in Nieman Reports:
The GDPR includes the ‘Right to Be Forgotten,’ which allows individuals to request
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What is it that journalism studies is studying these days? A lot about newsrooms, less about everybody else in the news ecosystem

I am at the International Communication Association 2018 annual meeting in Prague. It is arguably the single most important international academic conference for communications research, media studies, and, by extension, work on journalism. This year, 130 individual papers have been accepted for presentation by the Journalism Studies Division after peer review. (The acceptance rate is normally less than 50 percent; this year it was 45 percent for full papers.) The ICA papers — most of them work-in-progress, fresh, recent, up-to-date work by a wide range of academics studying journalism from many countries, perspectives, and backgrounds — can provide the basis for at least a partial answer to an important question: What is the field of journalism studies actually studying today? So I did a quick and subjective categorization of all the paper titles by topic, following a similar post I did at the 2017 Future of Journalism conference
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Is your fake news about immigrants or politicians? It all depends on where you live

Facebook is ready for proposals from fake news researchers. Facebook rolled out a few announcements on its “strategy for stopping false news” on Wednesday. First, there’s a request for proposals from researchers who study fake news and want access to Facebook data (the company had announced this initiative last month; it’s funded by outside organizations, decisions won’t be subject to Facebook approval, and research will be released publicly). Second, there’s a “news literacy campaign that provides people with tips to spot false news and more information on the actions that we’re taking. This will appear at the top of News Feed and in print ads, starting in the U.S. and reaching other countries throughout the year.” It appears similar to the fake news election stuff that Facebook has run in some newspapers. Third, a 12-minute film called “Facing Facts” that is part of
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Who’s creating the top Facebook videos? “Not people you’ve necessarily heard of”

Motivational speaking, puppies, and babies: These are hot topics for the most popular Facebook videos so far in 2018, according to a NewsWhip analysis. Despite recent changes to Facebook’s algorithm that would supposedly decrease the visibility of clickbait-y and viral video, the second most popular native Facebook video this year is called “Babies and puppies,” from publisher Daily Picks and Flicks. The tenth most popular, from NTD Funniest, is “Dogs and cats always make us laugh! 🤣😂😽 I admit to watching these videos after linking to them here. Perhaps surprisingly, “seven of the ten most engaged Facebook video posts in 2018 so far [came] in at three minutes or longer, and the average across the ten [was] three minutes eleven seconds.” Motivational speaker Jay Shetty pops up multiple times in the most popular/most commented/most engaged list, and “the most frequently appearing names were the viral publishers such as NTD
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Vox’s new Netflix series is really good, but it doesn’t get us any closer to figuring out what news on streaming platforms looks like

Vox’s new series for Netflix debuted this morning, with the simple and deeply on-brand title Explained. (At least they didn’t get comma-happy and go with “, Explained.”) I watched the first episode and bits of the next two, and they’re good! The format will be familiar to anyone who’s watched Vox’s YouTube videos; they’ve posted the first episode, “Monogamy, Explained,” to YouTube, and as a Vox producer says in the intro: “If you like our YouTube, you’re going to love this.” Watch it for yourself: A lot of YouTube commenters do indeed seem to like it. (“Next level video essays. I freaking love this”; “YESSSSS MORE KNOWLEDGE”). Well, at least the ones who aren’t arguing with the video’s implicit endorsement of polyamory. (“VERY VERY POLITICIZED KNOWLEDGE YESS”; “Ahhh even more liberal vox garbage, Netflix has gone by the way of the dodo bird”; “Vox, attempting Continue reading "Vox’s new Netflix series is really good, but it doesn’t get us any closer to figuring out what news on streaming platforms looks like"

From Bible study to Google: How some Christian conservatives fact-check the news and end up confirming their existing beliefs

“As much as possible, when I know things are happening, I try to hear it or read it for myself first before reading any stories on it…I mean, they all lie in one way or another.” “It’s important to encourage people to think for themselves, and that’s why we have all these different news outlets. That’s why we have the internet and stuff. People are sick and tired of the same old narrative. These lies have become known. We know that the mainstream media is lying to people.” “To me, ‘fake news’ is, in a nutshell, people pushing a personal bias as the news.” “There’s news that’s false. These facts are made up or it’s not fact-checked or whatever, it’s false news. But I also think there’s a version of ‘fake news’ that’s different. Either news media or social media outlets will amplify Trump or his opinion
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After crowdfunding success, Swiss magazine Republik charts a course to “reclaim journalism as a profession”

In its first seven hours of existence, the Swiss online news magazine Republik — a startup with the allure of in-depth journalism and membership transparency — gained 3,000 subscribers and 750,000 Swiss francs. But that whirlwind of support created a new pressure: delivering on its promise. Thirteen months (and thousands more members) later, Republik is living up to the hype, reporting substantive investigations and finding new ways to engage and collaborate with readers — like virtual “dinner parties” to discuss the impact of its work. “If you don’t have democracy, if you don’t have really good information that you can cite, there’s a problem,” Susanne Sugimoto, Republik’s CEO, told me. She calls 20 Minutes, the free Tamedia tabloid read by about half the country each week, “a business success story, but it’s not a success story in terms of journalism with a deep quality.” Members of the Continue reading "After crowdfunding success, Swiss magazine Republik charts a course to “reclaim journalism as a profession”"