Grow the pie: Podcast revenue seems to be growing fast enough for everyone to get a slice

To absolutely no one’s surprise, I agree with this. Kafka articulated something I’ve been trying to say whenever I’ve written about the related issue of programmatic podcast advertising — but obviously, a whole lot better than I ever could — which is to essentially point out that rapid growth, as well as the implementation of technology and practices that push hard for rapid growth, often come at the expense of quality and general thoughtfulness of a space. I’ve come to feel about podcasting the way I’ve long felt about a certain up-and-coming city in the American inter-mountain west (which will remain nameless for reasons that will become clear): I love it a whole ton, and I love that loads more people are beginning to love it too, but maybe we should start shit-talking the place before the tourists get here and drive the market out of whack. Anyway, Kafka also Continue reading "Grow the pie: Podcast revenue seems to be growing fast enough for everyone to get a slice"

Canada’s The Logic is a new subscription news outlet focused on the innovation economy, à la The Information

Information wants to be $300 a year — and it wants to be exclusive, high quality, and lower quantity. At least that’s the bet being made by The Logic, the new Canadian subscription news outlet that soft-launches today. Modeled in large part after Silicon Valley news site The Information, its focus will be on the innovation economy and its impacts across business, policy, culture, and more. The site in beta will offer a free, curated 4 p.m. ET email briefing and an initial paywalled offering of two reported feature stories per week — though the editorial ideas and business model underpinning the site have been percolating for some time. “I got advice early on that you’ve got to be passionate about what you’re creating as a business, and there’s nothing I’m more passionate about than the fourth industrial revolution,” David Skok, The Logic’s CEO and Continue reading "Canada’s The Logic is a new subscription news outlet focused on the innovation economy, à la The Information"

In the hunt for sustainability, DocumentCloud and MuckRock are joining together as one organization

Muckcloud? Docrock? MuckumentCloud? Just kidding. They’re keeping their own names, but MuckRock and DocumentCloud are joining into one organization on the quest for sustainability as a hub for some of journalism’s most widely-used tools for transparency. “Joining forces for the sake of joining forces doesn’t make any sense,” Aron Pilhofer, DocumentCloud’s cofounder and executive director. “You would only do it in the case of where you think there can be opportunities to save money, to dramatically improve the product, to take the platform in a different direction, to expand, to have access to potential users you haven’t reached, on and on and on. All of those boxes are ticked by MuckRock.” Last summer, DocumentCloud teetered on the edge of unaffordable abyss while housed at Investigative Reporters and Editors, its home base since 2011. Pilhofer said DocumentCloud had always planned on asking the news organizations who are major Continue reading "In the hunt for sustainability, DocumentCloud and MuckRock are joining together as one organization"

Americans think the news industry is “headed in the wrong direction,” but what does that even mean?

Americans are fractured over the role of journalists, confused by terms like “op-ed,” and wary of the “watchdog” part of journalism, a new report suggests. Yet they’re also increasingly trustful of their favorite news outlets. A report out Tuesday from the Media Insight Project, surveying 2,019 adult members of the American public and 1,127 American journalists, suggests a somewhat jumbled and confusing situation. It’s most enlightening when it drills down into how specific groups are thinking about the media in general and about their own favored news sources. For example:
What do Americans think about the direction of the news industry? A majority, 56 percent, say it is headed in the wrong direction; 42 percent say the right direction. Views about the direction of the media correspond with trust. While 73 percent of those who trust the news media generally say the media is headed in the right direction,
Continue reading "Americans think the news industry is “headed in the wrong direction,” but what does that even mean?"

How can we restore trust in news? Here are 9 takeaways from Knight-supported research

Editor’s note: As part of its effort to explore the root causes of the current crisis in trust in the media, the Knight Foundation is commissioning a continuing series of white papers from academics and experts. Here’s what they’ve learned so far. (Disclosure: Knight has also been a funder of Nieman Lab.)

Institutional trust is down across the board in American society (with a few notable exceptions, such as the military). But trust in the media is particularly troubling, plummeting from 72 percent in 1976 to 32 percent in 2017. There are many reasons for this decline in trust, writes Yuval Levin, but one

Continue reading "How can we restore trust in news? Here are 9 takeaways from Knight-supported research"

Zika rumors got three times more shares than real Zika stories. What can health educators do?

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Blame and pesticides. Fake health news gets less attention than fake political news (and inaccurate science stuff has been shared to Facebook as long as there’s Facebook), but it’s a fascinating thing to study. (And the willingness to believe different kinds of fake news is linked.) A new paper in the American Journal of Health Education looks at how Zika rumors spread on Facebook compared to verified information; the researchers — who include University of South Florida’s Silvia Sommariva and her husband, Poynter’s Alexios Mantzarlis — found that Zika rumors were shared three times more than verified news, which could “hinder disease prevention efforts.” Using BuzzSumo, the researchers tracked the reach of

Continue reading "Zika rumors got three times more shares than real Zika stories. What can health educators do?"

Here are some of the ways you might be doing email newsletters inefficiently (and how to do them better)

Get into email newsletters, they said. It’ll be easy, they said. It’s cost-effective, mostly not algorithmically filtered, and good for turning loyal readers into subscribers, they said. The last few years’ fervor for email can obscure the production efforts that go into editorial newsletters and the metrics around engagement and conversion — headaches discussed widely among the people actually sending those emails. How much time are those people spending on fiddly work — trying to make the template cooperate, cutting down the size of an image-packed email, worrying about broken links? Trying to recreate stories for the website that were first produced for email? Trying to figure out whether its open rate — to be distinguished from unique open rate — is respectable, or whether it’s a useful metric at all? Trying to guess whether all that hard work ends up hidden in readers’ promotions tab in their inboxes,
™
Continue reading "Here are some of the ways you might be doing email newsletters inefficiently (and how to do them better)"