Word up! This is the story behind The New York Times’ most famous tweet (which is 10 years old today)

In March 2007, New York Times developer Jacob Harris had some spare time and decided to create a Times account on a fledgling service that is today the preferred communication platform for the president of the United States. Harris set up @nytimes and wrote the code that powered it in an afternoon. “Using twitter’s APIs, I was able to get headlines from the New York Times feeds to my cell phone with only an idle afternoon and a few lines of Ruby,” he wrote later. The account ran off an RSS feed of the Times’ top stories, tweeting out just the headlines. By the middle of March, it had accrued all of 72 followers, most of whom were either Harris’s friends or other developers.

SXSW 2017: Embattled Journalism in Focus

The annual tech festival South By Southwest Interactive is widely regarded as an indicator of things to come across industries, and journalism is no exception. As a matter of fact, this year’s edition of SXSW was the first to have a dedicated “Journalism” track. “In 2017, journalism in the U.S. and around the world is under intense attack by various forces,” SXSW’s chief programming officer Hugh Forrest said. “Given the perilous nature of this industry, it makes perfect sense that we covered it extensively at SXSW 2017.” Like every year, dozens of media innovators and journalists descended upon Austin, turning the mecca for techies and creatives into a star-studded media gathering that included the New York Times’ Jim Rutenberg and Dean Baquet, former proprietor of Gawker Media Nick Denton, CNN’s Van Jones and Brian Stelter, Dan Rather, Recode’s Kara Swisher and many more. Of the 70 sessions in
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Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it

From new mottos to television advertising campaigns, news organizations are refocusing efforts on why their readers should trust them. But new research suggests they should also focus on who their “ambassadors” are: The main factor in determining a reader’s trust in an article appears to be who shared it, not the news organization that published it, according to a study out Monday from The Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. People say that the news organization matters to them a lot, and a 2016 study by the Media Insight Project found that Americans said the original news source was the biggest “cue” they used to help determine whether they trusted the content in an article they found on Facebook. “We wanted to test whether that was really true, or whether people just believed that was Continue reading "Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it"

To slow the spread of false stories on WhatsApp, this Colombian news site is enlisting its own readers

In 2016, Colombian journalists faced the challenge of telling one of the most important stories in the country’s history: after more than 50 years, the Colombian government and the FARC reached a peace agreement to end the decades-long conflict that had left more than eight million victims. It was a critical moment for news organizations, which had to find ways to explain clearly a process tangled with political interests that would determine the future of millions of people who were calling for truth, justice, and reparations. News media, however, had another challenge: to keep up with various conversations circulating on social media, especially via WhatsApp, where all kinds of viral stories about the negotiations had spread. Users shared chain messages (“cadenas”) without an understanding of whether the news they shared was accurate — a critical issue, since those messages could’ve swayed votes in the country’s referendum on a peace deal
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MediaShift Podcast #225: Trump Wants to Kill Big Bird; DOJ Indicts Russian Hackers of Yahoo; Dot Connector Studio’s Jessica Clark

In the news this week, President Trump’s first budget strips funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which could be devastating for small market local public stations. The Feds indicted four Russians for the massive hacking breach at Yahoo in 2014, compromising data for 500 million users. And European governments throw down the gauntlet for Facebook, Twitter and Google over hate speech and fake news. Our Metric of the Week is Snapchat Filter Metrics, and Jessica Clark of Dot Connector Studios joins us to talk about helping the Knight Foundation study their podcasting investments.  Don’t have a lot of time to spare, but still want to get a roundup of the week’s top news? Then check out our Digital Media Brief below!

MediaShift Podcast

Digital Media Brief


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Following Nude Photo-Sharing Scandal, Marines Expected to Release Social Media Guidelines

imageedit_55_4394115246 Last week, we told you that the Defense Department was looking into reports that a secret Facebook group was being used by Marines and veterans to pass around naked photos of enlisted females. Now, the Marines have released new social media guidelines for members. A U.S. Defense official told CNN that Marine Corps commandant Gen. Robert Neller will sign the new guidelines today, though they appeared on the Marines’ website yesterday. The signing of the guidelines is, per CNN, “in order to clarify the military code of justice punishments that can be applied to social media sexual harassment to harmonize it with other forms of sexual harassment.” The Senate Armed Services Committee had a hearing yesterday in which Neller reiterated his commitment, identifying the elements of military culture that allowed or encouraged this to happen. During the hearing, it was clear that there are now questions about whether the Uniform Code of Military Justice is Continue reading "Following Nude Photo-Sharing Scandal, Marines Expected to Release Social Media Guidelines"