Are news publishers directly liable for embedding tweets that contain images not created by that tweeter?

News publishers will now be thinking twice before embedding in articles a certain viral tweet that contains a “full color image” of Tom Brady and Danny Ainge, taken in 2016. In fact, any publisher embedding any tweets containing content that might not be original to the tweeter now has at least some reason to be concerned. On Thursday night, a New York federal judge ruled that simply embedding certain tweets can constitute a copyright violation by news publishers. The judge wrote (via The Hollywood Reporter):
Having carefully considered the embedding issue, this Court concludes, for the reasons discussed below, that when defendants caused the embedded Tweets to appear on their websites, their actions violated plaintiff’s exclusive display right; the fact that the image was hosted on a server owned and operated by an unrelated third party (Twitter) does not shield them from this result.
The photo in question, taken Continue reading "Are news publishers directly liable for embedding tweets that contain images not created by that tweeter?"

Why ‘Dialogue Journalism’ Is Having a Moment

Turn on the TV today, and chances are you’ll see political commentators sparring. Log on to Twitter and you’ll see the latest heated tweet from President Trump. We’re living in a time of overwhelming connection thanks to the interwebs, but chances are, we’re not nearly as connected to those those who don’t hold similar beliefs. In a polarizing moment when trust in media and the government is low, a number of new projects, now commonly called “dialogue journalism,” from organizations including Spaceship Media, Hello Project and the Seattle Times are focusing on bridging communities and pushing diverse viewpoints. Dialogue journalism uses engagement projects to tap into nuanced audiences, providing them with a platform—such as a Facebook group or a video call—to encourage sometimes difficult conversations. Journalists are present to help guide the dialogue, fact check and use the platforms as a launch pad for stories. These projects attempt to use
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Snap brings its heat map feature out of the app. Will any news publishers want to use it?

Snap — née Snapchat — first rolled out its heat map feature last June. The map algorithmically surfaced Snap stories around events like sports and concerts; Snap editorial staff also curated stories around other events, from New York Fashion Week to real-time coverage of unfolding tragedies like last fall’s Las Vegas mass shooting and the Manhattan terrorist attack. Now the map is available to anyone on the wider web. Publishers can embed the Snap stories into articles, as they might a tweet or Facebook post. Here’s a curated collection around Sunday’s explosion and fire at an electric station, and subsequent blackouts, in Puerto Continue reading "Snap brings its heat map feature out of the app. Will any news publishers want to use it?"