Fewer women, people of color worked at radio stations in 2017 than 2016, a new survey shows


This post is by Marlee Baldridge from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Radio and Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) and Hofstra University just released its annual newsroom survey on newsroom diversity, which covers 2017 and shows slight progress over 2016. However, there is still work to be done. The good news is that women are slowly seeing themselves reflected in a wider variety of broadcast newsroom jobs. The bad news is that people of color are still struggling to reach proportional numbers of representation in newsrooms. RTDNA and Hofstra surveyed 1,683 non-satellite TV stations and a sample of 3,542 radio stations in the fourth quarter of 2017. 1,333 TV stations responded (79.2 percent of those asked), and 415 radio news directors and general managers representing 1,110 radio stations responded.

TV broadcast

More women of color are in TV management than ever before — barely. Beating the record of 24.6 percent in 2001, this year 24.8 percent of respondents
Continue reading "Fewer women, people of color worked at radio stations in 2017 than 2016, a new survey shows"

Exiting the exit poll: The AP’s new plan for surveying voters after a not-so-hot 2016


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




One hundred and seventy-four days remain until the United States’ midterm elections (421 until the next presidential election, but who’s counting) — which means there’s still time to “evolve” how polling is conducted. The 2016 presidential election wasn’t polling’s shining moment, with many post-mortems pointing to opinion polls misleading election forecasters and underestimating now-President Trump’s support. It didn’t help that some polls were tied to news organizations that don’t really have the resources anymore to support this work — at least doing this work well. There’s no perfect poll aside from (maybe) the ballot itself, but the polling system — both conducted by the media and reported on in the media — has faced critics since long before November 8, 2016. These issues contributed to the Associated Press’ and Fox News’ departure from the Election Day polling data shared by the major networks last year. But now the wire Continue reading "Exiting the exit poll: The AP’s new plan for surveying voters after a not-so-hot 2016"

Yes, CNN Has Released a Poll on What People Think of Kanye West


This post is by Tamar Auber from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Kanye West has been making waves with a number of highly publicized and controversial remarks recently, even sparking a parody on Saturday Night Live. Yet while the majority of Americans heard about West’s remarks, most are not impressed. According to a CNN poll conducted by SSRS, 72 percent of those polled said they heard about West’s recent remarks and tweets like this one on Donald Trump, slavery, and his pro-Trump political debate/single Ye vs. The People. Most people, 52 percent, though, think West’s real motivation is publicity, not politics. The majority of those Continue reading "Yes, CNN Has Released a Poll on What People Think of Kanye West"

#MetricShift Chat: Metrics That Should Matter vs. Metrics That Matter to Publishers


This post is by Tim Cigelske from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




For this chat, we’re partnering with the analytics and audience insight platform Parse.ly to do a deep dive into what publishers care about — and roadblocks they face — when using metrics to make decisions. Parse.ly recently surveyed 270 brand, agency and publisher content professionals to reveal useful metrics, the silos of data access, and how analytics impact content they create. A full report can be found on their website. In our #MetricShift chat on Friday, February 24, starting at 1 p.m. ET / 12 p.m CT / 10 a.m. PT, we’ll talk with Parse.ly and editors who use the tool about the highlights and questions raised by the new publisher metrics report. The chat, which you can find by searching for #MetricShift on Twitter, will be moderated by Tim Cigelske, associate editor of metrics at MediaShift. Guests will include experts from Parse.ly and Continue reading "#MetricShift Chat: Metrics That Should Matter vs. Metrics That Matter to Publishers"

Everyone Is Shocked by Trump’s New ‘Mainstream Media Accountability Survey’: ‘It’s Deranged’


This post is by Lindsey Ellefson from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Screen Shot 2017-02-17 at 10.14.57 AM Donald trump and the GOP released a “Mainstream Media Accountability Poll” that more or less backs up his anti-press press conference from yesterday, even before the results are collected. Here are a few of the questions.

How CIR Measured Greater Awareness of Health Risks After Investigation


This post is by Lindsay Green-Barber from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This post was written and originally published by CIR and is republished here with permission. Some stories change laws. Others force governments and companies to change their policies. Advocacy and interest groups often use these investigations in their own work. Still other stories change a community’s awareness of an issue. The first three examples of impact are real, discrete events we can measure. The last one – changing awareness of an issue – proves to be much more difficult to know for sure. How can a media organization really prove a project increased the public’s knowledge? And does this even matter for lasting social, political and cultural change? I wanted to measure how a piece of investigative reporting changed public awareness on an issue. So I designed a survey that reached residents both before and after the story published, then analyzed the data for changes in attitude. Here’s a rundown
cir-strawberry-results1
cir-strawberry-results2
cir-strawberry-results3
Continue reading "How CIR Measured Greater Awareness of Health Risks After Investigation"

5 Lessons from Teaching Online and Hybrid Classes


This post is by Kathy E. Gill from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Click on the image to read the whole series

Sometimes baby steps make learning easier. But not always. I remember getting the email with the news that my web design class was transitioning from traditional face-to-face to hybrid: half the students in the classroom, half online (synchronous). And the email, a couple of years later, that said the class was transitioning to 100 percent online (synchronous). The progression seems logical, on its face. But it’s not. The three forms — 100 percent classroom, partial classroom/online, 100 percent online — are very different environments. Add to the mix a class that includes applied computer skills (lab time) and the differences become more pronounced. Stick with me, and perhaps my experience will make yours less bumpy.
Photo by theunquietlibrarian on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.

Photo by theunquietlibrarian on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.

1. Get to know the online environment

Imagine, for a moment, that you had
Doc10
Photo by Tim PIerce on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.
Continue reading "5 Lessons from Teaching Online and Hybrid Classes"

How much do you make? A CUNY grad student is collecting data on salaries in journalism


This post is by Joseph Lichterman from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Julia Haslanger wants to know how much you make. Last Friday, Haslanger, a graduate student in CUNY’s social journalism program, released Journo Salary Sharer, which asks journalists to anonymously share their salary information in order to help start a conversation about how much people in different positions throughout the journalism world earn. “As journalists, we know how to talk to people. We just have to suck it up and be brave and ask other people how much they make,” Haslanger told me. “There’s only so much I can do. I’m one person who has one survey on one place on the Internet. But you, as a journalist, have skills to find that information. This is an excuse for journalists to go out and ask those questions and start those conversations.” The site has two parts. The first part is a survey that asks respondents about their
JournoSalarySharer
Continue reading "How much do you make? A CUNY grad student is collecting data on salaries in journalism"

Publishers of local news sites say revenues are up, but many still aren’t paying themselves a salary


This post is by Madeline Welsh from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Results are in from a survey of 94 local news websites, and while revenue and reach remain concerns for many, the sites say they are doing okay. Conducted between March and April of this year on by Michele McLellan, the survey looked at the sites on Michele’s List, a database of local sites produced with CUNY’s Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism. The goal: to get a sense of the financial health and stability of the local news ecosystem. McLellan’s results include some heartening results (revenues up!) and some that are less so (nearly half of the publishers are not paying themselves any salary). Here are a few of the key figures:
Two-thirds (66 percent) make $100,000 a year or less in annual revenue and more than half (53 percent) make $50,000 or less. About a quarter (24 percent) make between $100,000 and $500,000. Nine percent make more Continue reading "Publishers of local news sites say revenues are up, but many still aren’t paying themselves a salary"

This Week in Review: Weak net neutrality and stifled startups, and a glimpse of U.S. journalists


This post is by Mark Coddington from Nieman Journalism Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This week’s essential reads: The three key reads this week are Stanford professor Barbara van Schewick on net neutrality and innovation, Indiana professors Lars Willnat and David Weaver’s findings from their survey of American journalists, and The New York Times’ David Segal on unwatched online video ads.

Will new FCC regulations harm startups?: The U.S. Federal Communications Commission’s proposed Internet regulations, which are set to be formally presented next week, are coming under fire from all corners, led by commissioners of the FCC itself. Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel called for FCC chair Tom Wheeler to postpone the presentation of the regulations because of the “torrent” of criticism they’ve prompted, a suggestion Wheeler promptly rejected. Another commissioner, Mignon Clyburn, reiterated her opposition to the sort of Internet “fast lanes” Wheeler is proposing, urging the FCC to revisit its approach to Internet regulation. Meanwhile, more than 100 Internet companies, including giants like Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, and Microsoft, sent a letter to the FCC expressing their concerns about the proposed regulations, calling them “a grave threat to the Internet.” Recode’s Amy Schatz and Time’s Sam Gustin provided some context for the backlash against Wheeler’s plan to allow Internet providers to make deals with content providers allowing them to provide faster access to their sites than everyone else. Mozilla, which makes the Firefox browser, went a step further, filing a proposal with the FCC to create a different class of Internet access connecting edge providers like Netflix and Dropbox to Internet users, which would be regulated as a utility like telephone service. The Washington Post’s Brian Fung and Ars Technica’s Jon Brodkin offered good explanations of what Mozilla’s proposing and how it fits into the history of U.S. Internet regulation. Concerns about the proposal are coming from the startup world in addition to tech giants. MIT Technology Review’s David Talbot reported that some venture capitalists say they’re steering clear of startups that would require fast connections for services like video or audio. Ars Technica’s Jon Brodkin countered that weak net neutrality won’t hurt startups based on fast connections, because the cable TV system is still so ripe for disruption, and startups targeting that system will still be magnets for VC funding. VC Fred Wilson warned that if the regulations go through, the “period of ‘permissionless innovation’ is likely to come to an end,” and at The Atlantic, Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick argued that a pay-to-play structure would upend the economics of Internet entrepreneurship, in which costs are low enough that entrepreneurs can make their apps available to users without initial outside funding. Now, up-front capital will be necessary, she said, making it so that investors can’t rely on the market to determine what startups might be successful before they invest. Despite the protests of a few major companies — most notably Netflix — The New York Times reported that most media and tech companies are simply trying to befriend broadband providers like Comcast, which is in the process of merging with Time Warner Cable. That merger got some stiff opposition from within the industry in testimony before Congress on Thursday. Still, Ron Fournier of the National Journal wondered why we’re seeing so little resistance to the new regulations and the merger compared with the flood of outrage that swamped SOPA and PIPA. Vox’s Nilay Patel wrote that between the FCC regulations, the Comcast merger, and the Aereo decision, this summer will radically change the Internet and media industries one way or another.

utopia-dystopia-cc A bleak picture of the American journalistResearchers at Indiana University released results this week from the most recent edition of a survey of American journalists they’ve conducted each decade since the 1970s. Derek Thompson of The Atlantic provided the broadest summary of the study’s widespread findings, highlighting journalists’ decreasing job satisfaction and increasing age and ethical scruples, as well as its continued domination by white men. Several aspects of the survey drew additional attention: Jim Romenesko noted that the majority of journalists believe journalism is headed in the wrong direction, and The Wire’s Eric Levenson pointed out that the number of journalists who approve of the use of confidential or personal documents without permission is decreasing. The most newsworthy finding for many media observers (particularly on the right) was the decreasing number of journalists who identify as Republicans — just 7 percent, down from 18 percent in 2002. The number of Democratic journalists is declining as well, with 28 percent describing themselves that way compared to 36 percent in 2002. Instead, the number of journalists identifying as independent is booming. Chris Cillizza of The Washington Post said the shift toward independence mirrors a movement in the broader electorate, The Atlantic’s Thompson suggested that the statistics should be good news for conservative journalists, who should find themselves in demand if public desire for more conservative news truly outpaces the amount offered.
Reading roundup: It wasn’t too busy of a week on the journalism and tech front, but there were a few other stories worth following: — As The New York Times reported, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law this week requiring popular bloggers to register with the government, a measure that many observers believe will serve to more closely track and stifle online speech. A Reporters Without Borders article from last month does a good job of explaining the new law, how it works and where it fits in Russia’s recent recent of online repression, as does an Animal New York piece from this week. Meanwhile, as The Washington Post reported, pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine have been intimidating and attacking journalists and taking them prisoner. — The Los Angeles Times unveiled a site redesign this week, with a few distinctive new features: Digiday noted that users can move from one story to the next by simply continuing to scroll down, resulting in an endless vertical stream of content. Gizmodo highlighted its Instagram-esque “visual browsing” mode that emphasizing images and horizontal movement. And the Lab’s Joshua Benton wrote about its pre-written tweets and status updates at the top of stories, taking advantage of the fact that many people share stories without reading them. — New York magazine published a long story by Joe Hagan going deep inside Lara Logan’s tenure at CBS News and raising doubts about whether she will ever return to the network after being put on indefinite leave for her erroneous 60 Minutes report last fall on the Benghazi attack of 2012. Slate’s Amanda Hess flagged the story for its sexist characterization of Logan in various spots. — Finally, two more pieces to take a look at this weekend: The New York Times’ David Segal went deep into the paltry numbers of people actually watching online video ads and the difficulty in measuring them, and at the Lab, News Corp.’s Raju Narisetti offered a variety of creative ways to make the Pulitzer Prizes more useful in promoting good journalism.
Photo of FCC chairman Tom Wheeler testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in December by AP/Susan Walsh. Photo of graffiti by Jonny Hughes used under a Creative Commons license.

This Week in Review: Weak net neutrality and stifled startups, and a glimpse of U.S. journalists


This post is by Mark Coddington from Nieman Journalism Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This week’s essential reads: The three key reads this week are Stanford professor Barbara van Schewick on net neutrality and innovation, Indiana professors Lars Willnat and David Weaver’s findings from their survey of American journalists, and The New York Times’ David Segal on unwatched online video ads.

Will new FCC regulations harm startups?: The U.S. Federal Communications Commission’s proposed Internet regulations, which are set to be formally presented next week, are coming under fire from all corners, led by commissioners of the FCC itself. Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel called for FCC chair Tom Wheeler to postpone the presentation of the regulations because of the “torrent” of criticism they’ve prompted, a suggestion Wheeler promptly rejected. Another commissioner, Mignon Clyburn, reiterated her opposition to the sort of Internet “fast lanes” Wheeler is proposing, urging the FCC to revisit its approach to Internet regulation. Meanwhile, more than 100 Internet companies, including giants like Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, and Microsoft, sent a letter to the FCC expressing their concerns about the proposed regulations, calling them “a grave threat to the Internet.” Recode’s Amy Schatz and Time’s Sam Gustin provided some context for the backlash against Wheeler’s plan to allow Internet providers to make deals with content providers allowing them to provide faster access to their sites than everyone else. Mozilla, which makes the Firefox browser, went a step further, filing a proposal with the FCC to create a different class of Internet access connecting edge providers like Netflix and Dropbox to Internet users, which would be regulated as a utility like telephone service. The Washington Post’s Brian Fung and Ars Technica’s Jon Brodkin offered good explanations of what Mozilla’s proposing and how it fits into the history of U.S. Internet regulation. Concerns about the proposal are coming from the startup world in addition to tech giants. MIT Technology Review’s David Talbot reported that some venture capitalists say they’re steering clear of startups that would require fast connections for services like video or audio. Ars Technica’s Jon Brodkin countered that weak net neutrality won’t hurt startups based on fast connections, because the cable TV system is still so ripe for disruption, and startups targeting that system will still be magnets for VC funding. VC Fred Wilson warned that if the regulations go through, the “period of ‘permissionless innovation’ is likely to come to an end,” and at The Atlantic, Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick argued that a pay-to-play structure would upend the economics of Internet entrepreneurship, in which costs are low enough that entrepreneurs can make their apps available to users without initial outside funding. Now, up-front capital will be necessary, she said, making it so that investors can’t rely on the market to determine what startups might be successful before they invest. Despite the protests of a few major companies — most notably Netflix — The New York Times reported that most media and tech companies are simply trying to befriend broadband providers like Comcast, which is in the process of merging with Time Warner Cable. That merger got some stiff opposition from within the industry in testimony before Congress on Thursday. Still, Ron Fournier of the National Journal wondered why we’re seeing so little resistance to the new regulations and the merger compared with the flood of outrage that swamped SOPA and PIPA. Vox’s Nilay Patel wrote that between the FCC regulations, the Comcast merger, and the Aereo decision, this summer will radically change the Internet and media industries one way or another.

utopia-dystopia-cc A bleak picture of the American journalistResearchers at Indiana University released results this week from the most recent edition of a survey of American journalists they’ve conducted each decade since the 1970s. Derek Thompson of The Atlantic provided the broadest summary of the study’s widespread findings, highlighting journalists’ decreasing job satisfaction and increasing age and ethical scruples, as well as its continued domination by white men. Several aspects of the survey drew additional attention: Jim Romenesko noted that the majority of journalists believe journalism is headed in the wrong direction, and The Wire’s Eric Levenson pointed out that the number of journalists who approve of the use of confidential or personal documents without permission is decreasing. The most newsworthy finding for many media observers (particularly on the right) was the decreasing number of journalists who identify as Republicans — just 7 percent, down from 18 percent in 2002. The number of Democratic journalists is declining as well, with 28 percent describing themselves that way compared to 36 percent in 2002. Instead, the number of journalists identifying as independent is booming. Chris Cillizza of The Washington Post said the shift toward independence mirrors a movement in the broader electorate, The Atlantic’s Thompson suggested that the statistics should be good news for conservative journalists, who should find themselves in demand if public desire for more conservative news truly outpaces the amount offered.
Reading roundup: It wasn’t too busy of a week on the journalism and tech front, but there were a few other stories worth following: — As The New York Times reported, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law this week requiring popular bloggers to register with the government, a measure that many observers believe will serve to more closely track and stifle online speech. A Reporters Without Borders article from last month does a good job of explaining the new law, how it works and where it fits in Russia’s recent recent of online repression, as does an Animal New York piece from this week. Meanwhile, as The Washington Post reported, pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine have been intimidating and attacking journalists and taking them prisoner. — The Los Angeles Times unveiled a site redesign this week, with a few distinctive new features: Digiday noted that users can move from one story to the next by simply continuing to scroll down, resulting in an endless vertical stream of content. Gizmodo highlighted its Instagram-esque “visual browsing” mode that emphasizing images and horizontal movement. And the Lab’s Joshua Benton wrote about its pre-written tweets and status updates at the top of stories, taking advantage of the fact that many people share stories without reading them. — New York magazine published a long story by Joe Hagan going deep inside Lara Logan’s tenure at CBS News and raising doubts about whether she will ever return to the network after being put on indefinite leave for her erroneous 60 Minutes report last fall on the Benghazi attack of 2012. Slate’s Amanda Hess flagged the story for its sexist characterization of Logan in various spots. — Finally, two more pieces to take a look at this weekend: The New York Times’ David Segal went deep into the paltry numbers of people actually watching online video ads and the difficulty in measuring them, and at the Lab, News Corp.’s Raju Narisetti offered a variety of creative ways to make the Pulitzer Prizes more useful in promoting good journalism.
Photo of FCC chairman Tom Wheeler testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in December by AP/Susan Walsh. Photo of graffiti by Jonny Hughes used under a Creative Commons license.

Pew: Plurality of Americans Think Media Covering MH370 the ‘Right Amount’


This post is by Josh Feldman from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Cable news, CNN in particular, has received quite a lot of criticism for perceived over-coverage of the missing Malaysian Airlines flight 370, but a new Pew survey finds that close to half of Americans believes that the news has given the story the “right amount of coverage,” and only a third believe that the coverage has gone way too far.

48 percent surveyed said news organizations gave MH370 the “right amount” of coverage, 33 percent said it was overdone, and somehow, 12 percent said there hasn’t been enough coverage. And a lot of people have been paying attention, because 44 percent of people have been following the coverage very closely.

Demographically speaking, the only group that came close to an even split between “too much” and “right amount” was college graduates, while a higher percentage of Democrats believed the story was under-covered as opposed to Republicans and independents.

Meanwhile, the crisis in Ukraine has not been covered nearly as much, and yet 56 percent of those surveyed believe that this international story has been given the right amount of coverage.

[photo via screengrab]

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Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

Obama, Hillary Top ‘Most Admired’ Gallup Poll, Trailed by Bush, Palin, and the Pope


This post is by Josh Feldman from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Despite a rough political year for both of them, both President Obama and Hillary Clinton easily took the top spots in Gallup’s annual “most admired” poll, beating out Sarah Palin and Pope Francis.

In the category of Most Admired Man of 2013, Obama took 16 percent, with the Pope tying George W. Bush at four percent. Other notable mentions on that list include Clint Eastwood, Ted Cruz, and Jimmy Carter, all of whom garnered one percent each.

Clinton topped the Most Admired Woman of 2013 question, taking 15 percent to second-place-winner Oprah‘s 6 percent. Michelle Obama tied Palin at 5 percent, and the young, inspirational Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai only received two percent support in the survey.

This is the sixth consecutive year Obama has topped the list, even has his approval numbers have hit all-time lows.

[h/t TIME]

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Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

How Much Do Men Love Their iPhones? New Survey Has Unbelievable Results


This post is by Josh Feldman from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The new-and-improved iPhone 5c and 5s models are exciting consumers around the world, and a new survey by a money-saving website shows just how much people are obsessed with getting their hands on them.

SaleLand found that one in eight single men would prefer one of the new iPhones to a new girlfriend, but it goes even further than that for some of them.

A further 3 per cent of respondents to the survey said they would happily ditch their current love if they got the newest iPhone in return.

And its not just iPhones that could tempt men into singledom – 5 per cent of those asked would engineer a break-up in order to get a smartphone not made by Apple.

One man said: “I’ve been going out with the same girl for three years but if it meant getting may hands on a new iPhone she’d be dumped instantly. To be honest I’m getting a bit fed up with her anyway.”

Isn’t love grand?

So far, it is not clear just how many men around the world have been giving the opportunity to choose a new phone over a romantic partner, but one assumes anyone who has won’t be finding themselves a new love interest for quite a while.

[h/t The Blaze]

[photo via screengrab]

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Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

Rasmussen Survey: 26 Percent Of Obama Supporters View Tea Party As Significant Terror Threat


This post is by Josh Feldman from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Rasmussen Reports conducted a survey on nuclear arms and terrorist threats, and found some interesting results about the latter. Overall, slightly over half of the people surveyed believed that radical Muslims are the biggest terrorist threat facing the United States, but among those surveyed who approve of the job President Obama is doing, only 29 percent believe agree, while 26 percent say that the tea party movement is the bigger threat to the United States.

RELATED: TIME Poll: Occupy Wall Street Is More Popular Than The Tea Party

The survey question that elicited the response was phrased thusly:

Which is a bigger terrorist threat to the United States today – radical Muslims, the Tea Party, local militia groups, the Occupy Wall Street movement, or other religious or political extremists?

Overall, 13 percent of those polled pointed to the tea party, while only 2 percent blamed Occupy. Among those who disapprove of Obama’s job performance, 75 percent agreed that radical Muslims are the bigger threat.

But it’s the priorities of Obama supporters that stuck out for Rasmussen.

[A]mong those who approve of the president’s job performance, just 29% see radical Muslims as the bigger threat. Twenty-six percent (26%) say it’s the Tea Party that concerns them most. Among those who Strongly Approve of the president, more fear the Tea Party than radical Muslims.

Another interesting piece of data they found is that Americans with six-figure incomes view the tea party movement as a bigger threat (21 percent) than the Occupy movement (2 percent).

You can read Rasmussen’s full write-up for its report here.

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Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

Who’s Paying Aereo to Watch Free TV?


This post is by Peter Kafka from AllThingsD » Peter Kafka


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




dick dawson survey saysIs Aereo legal?

We’ll see.

If Aereo is legal, what does that mean for the TV business?

We’ll see.

Who exactly is Aereo’s target market? Who’s going to pay them $8 a month to watch broadcast TV — but only broadcast TV — on the Web?

Ah. That we can start to answer.

Or, at least, we can see who Aereo thinks is using the service today.

Aereo has yet to talk about how many people are using the service, which is currently only available in the New York City area. But at our D: Dive into Media conference in February, CEO Chet Kanojia sketched out a rough sense of his customers.

Half of them, he said, are either cord-cutters or cord-nevers — people who used to have cable TV or have never signed up for it — and half are people who are still paying for cable.

And now, via a customer survey Aereo is sending out, we can deduce a bit more about Aereo’s sense of itself and its customers. Here’s a screenshot from the survey, which landed in my inbox today:

aereo screenshot

 

“Professional working parent” is a pretty broad group of people, I suppose. Same for “sports enthusiast” (though I think those people usually call themselves “fans”). But if you’re like me, you take one look at this list and you have a good sense of the ideal Aereo user — an edge case of some sort or another.

Which doesn’t mean Aereo thinks the business will be small — hence the $63 million it has raised so far. But until there’s a box there labeled “Just a normal person who watches TV like everyone else,” it’s hard to argue that this is aimed at a wide swath of America.

MediaShift Readers Want More Interactivity, More Video, More Text


This post is by MediaShift from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It's been a long time since our last MediaShift Survey back in 2006, the year after we launched. If you don't remember back that far, MediaShift was just a one-man blog run by me. Since that time, we've added the Idea Lab site, the Collaboration Central site, and expanded our coverage to include hundreds of contributors; events and mixers; and regular audio podcasts and video reports. Whew.

Looking back at those 2006 survey results, I'm happy to say that we did hear you loud and clear on many points:

> You asked us to make MediaShift a group blog, and we've certainly done that. We now have dozens of contributors as well as a staff of editors, marketers, sales and tech folks.

> You wanted us to do more coverage of events, and we've done that, as well as launching our own events and mixers.

> You asked us to cover more business issues related to legacy media as well as global issues, and I think we've done that. (Check out our Business section and our Global View section.)

> You said you wanted us to launch an audio podcast, and we've done that twice in different formats (and are working on a relaunch for February of The Mediatwits).

So what about now? We sent out another reader survey last fall and received 824 responses this time, many of them likely lured by the chance to win a new iPad. (We'll get to the iPad winner a bit later.) As before, readers were not shy with their opinions. If I had to give a headline on the results I'd say people like what we do and want more -- more stories about changes in the media business, more guides, more training and workshops (uh, we don't do those yet), and a more fun podcast.

Note: This was an unscientific survey, served up as a pop-up on the site and linked from our various social feeds.

Who You Are

It's always interesting to get a demographic snapshot of our audience. Here are some tidbits about you:

> 53.2% are female; about 80% are in the U.S.; and 60% make more than $50,000 per year.

> You are quite educated, with 40% being college graduates with bachelor's degrees, 36% having master's degrees, and 9% having a doctorate.

> You have varied occupations, with 20% being educators, 20% being self-employed, 16% working at media companies, 8% in executive or management positions, and 7% students.

> Your age is impressively varied, with similar numbers of you aged 35 to 44 as aged 45 to 54, and a similarity between those aged 25 to 34 as aged 64 and up.

Check out this chart showing the age spread:

ChartExport age.jpg

> Most of you come to the site occasionally, while others are regulars. 53% say they come "once in awhile," 25% come once a week, and 11% come once a day.

> You are quite knowledgeable about digital and social media. 43% say they are "very knowledgeable," 33% say they are "somewhat knowledgeable," 17% say they are "expert" with just 7% saying they are novices.

> You use social media regularly, with 22% finding out about MediaShift through Twitter, 12% through Facebook, and 5% from Google+. Check out this chart showing how you first heard about MediaShift:

ChartExport find out.jpg

What You Like

We asked a series of questions about what you like about us, and how you like to get information. Here are some of the key takeaways:

> On a question about which parts of our offerings you like (where respondents could answer more than once), the MediaShift site took the lead with 81%, followed by Idea Lab (62%) and Collaboration Central (22%). Beyond the site, 50% like our social feeds, 22% like our email newsletters, and 11% like the Mediatwits podcast.

> Topics of greatest interest include changes in mainstream media (69%), digital and journalism education (63%), how-to or guide articles (60%), and how social media can help you (56%). I think we could probably do a better job of covering changes to mainstream media and more how-to articles, while we have done a decent job on education and social media.

Here's a chart showing your interest in various topics we cover:

ChartExport topics.jpg

> When asked where people get our content, the lion's share still get it on a laptop or desktop (92%), but respondents could make multiple choices and they also marked mobile phone (27%), tablet (25%), email newsletter (14.5%), and RSS reader (8%).

What You Want

We asked a series of questions to determine interest in what we offer and what we might offer in the future. Here are some of those answers:

> For our multimedia mix, the majority (53%) felt it was just right, while 19% want more video and only 4% want more audio. I was surprised to see that 24% would prefer more text stories instead of multimedia.

> It was fascinating to see the demand for training and workshops. Many of you also wanted conferences, a line of e-books, more video, and more email newsletters. You'll be happy to hear that we are launching e-books soon. Here's the chart showing what you want (people could vote more than once):

ChartExport like to see.jpg

Fun Ideas and Quotes

We left a lot of room for people to give us feedback on our Mediatwits podcast and our offerings in general. Here's a selection of some of the more critical, interesting (and entertaining) thoughts from you:

"I feel the hosts [of Mediatwits] could be better prepared. I understand podcasts are economical sources for audio discussion, but I feel the personalities are going about it minute-by-minute, stumbling, pausing, and pondering on what to say next. There's a lack of confidence and professionalism that sounds from them. Still, I like the topics that are covered and find the guests informative."

"Mostly, the podcasts are too 'big.' I enjoy learning about the bigger aspects of what's happening in the media, but I mostly focus on what will affect me as an editor and an author."

"More content designed for beginning journalists -- I teach high-school English and journalism; the more resources you provide to help my students read analytically, think critically, and write crisply, the better."

"Less content and information on grant award winners. I want strong how-to information and not profile pieces on organizations who have won grants. There are media people and organizations who are doing some amazing things using available limited resources. I get tired of reading about foundation-sponsored programs. Innovative yes, but I'd rather see what others are accomplishing."

"The content is great, especially guest blog posts. More interaction on the site would be better. For example, I follow Poynter's CoverItLive chats, which are helpful and allow users to interact with guests."

"Site seems cluttered and uninviting whether on 4:3 or 16:9 display. For the Home page, try a two column layout instead of the current three/four. Too much of the top of the page is taken up with PBS Search, Sponsor ad banner, Quick Links, and site navigation."

"It's a big country. Don't forget the middle."

"Like the inside looks at changes in the industry, longer articles are better. Also posts from people in the trenches doing things are always great."

"MediaShift provides insight into the meaningful use of technology. As an educator, I value - and bookmark - pretty much every article that comes my way, each one relevant, timely, and thought-provoking."

"I think you are an important fixture in the new journalism. Please don't stop! I think a conference would be an awesome idea... make it academic and professional. Don't leave anyone out! Have everything from social media to multimedia journalism. This could be HUGE!"

"You're at the vanguard of media as it progresses. But you need to have more of a two-way dialogue with your audience who are right alongside you in this."

"I have just found it recently, and I love it. There is nothing else I've found anywhere near this well done. I have referred the site to my media studies students, and some friends in the fields of media and technology."

iPad Winner!

And finally, we had a winner for our iPad giveaway: Shannan Bowen, who is a digital/social media producer for Atlantic Media. I asked Bowen for her personal take on MediaShift, and here's what she said:
shannan bowen.jpg

"MediaShift provides the insight I need for both my professional media career and my Master's program in Media Entrepreneurship at American University. From newsletters about 'Daily Must Reads' to Idea Lab posts from a diverse group of community news innovators, I turn to MediaShift for updates on a wide range of topics in digital media. As the effort continues, I'd love to read more posts by new names, including younger media professionals and students. Also, I'm a fan of both MediaShift and the Idea Lab blog, but I wonder if it would make sense to merge the two while still providing a distinct channel for Knight News Challenge winners. Either way, MediaShift has potential to grow as a resource for media education and inspiration."

Thanks to everyone for filling out the survey, and if you have more public feedback (good or bad), use the comments below or fill out our feedback form.

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian and fiancee Renee. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit. and Circle him on Google+

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Fox & MSNBC Became More Extreme As Election Day Neared, Reports Pew


This post is by Andrew Kirell from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Rival cable news channels Fox News and MSNBC became even more “extreme” in their coverage of President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney during the the last week of the 2012 presidential campaign, says a new Pew study.

The study, released today by Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, found that in the final week before election day, MSNBC’s negative coverage of Romney jumped to 68 percent, compared to the 57 percent negative coverage they gave him for most of October.

Fox News’ negative coverage of Obama increased to 56 percent in that final week from the 47 percent negative Obama coverage during October.

On the other hand, during the final pre-election week, MSNBC’s positive coverage of Obama shot up to 51 percent from 33 percent; and Fox News’ favorable Romney coverage went from 34 percent to 42 percent.

Full survey results here.

[h/t Doug Mataconis]
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AP Poll Finds More Americans Believe Obama Is Jewish Than Muslim


This post is by Andrew Kirell from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




According to a new Associated Press survey, more Americans believe President Barack Obama is Jewish than believe that the president is a Muslim; while a plurality of the surveyed individuals believe he has “no religion.”

The survey, conducted using 1,071 random adults during the first week of September, asked, “Do you happen to know the religion of [Barack Obama]?”

The results were as follows:

Protestant — 28%
Catholic — 5%
Mormon — 0%
Jewish — 18%
Muslim — 10%
Other religion — 2%
No religion — 35%
Don’t know — 2%
Refused/Not Answered — 28%

Interestingly, the percentage of Americans who believe Obama is Jewish up from 0% in 2010, while the 10% of those who believe Obama to be of the Muslim faith is down from 17% two years ago.

Another noticeable shift in opinion is in those who believe the president has “no religion.” In 2010, only 2% of the surveyed said that he is areligious, while this year a plurality of 35% answered as such.

Despite the president repeatedly self-identifying as a Christian, only 33% of the surveyed Americans answered that Obama is any form of a Christian.

The same survey also found that 39% of Americans believe President Obama was born in another country.

By asking “Where was Barack Obama born, as far as you know?” the Associate Press found that 49% believe Obama is an America-born citizen, 39% believe he is foreign-born, and 12% refused/declined to answer.

Full survey results here.

[h/t Chris Moody, Yahoo! News]
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