Exiting the exit poll: The AP’s new plan for surveying voters after a not-so-hot 2016

One hundred and seventy-four days remain until the United States’ midterm elections (421 until the next presidential election, but who’s counting) — which means there’s still time to “evolve” how polling is conducted. The 2016 presidential election wasn’t polling’s shining moment, with many post-mortems pointing to opinion polls misleading election forecasters and underestimating now-President Trump’s support. It didn’t help that some polls were tied to news organizations that don’t really have the resources anymore to support this work — at least doing this work well. There’s no perfect poll aside from (maybe) the ballot itself, but the polling system — both conducted by the media and reported on in the media — has faced critics since long before November 8, 2016. These issues contributed to the Associated Press’ and Fox News’ departure from the Election Day polling data shared by the major networks last year. But now the wire Continue reading "Exiting the exit poll: The AP’s new plan for surveying voters after a not-so-hot 2016"

Yes, CNN Has Released a Poll on What People Think of Kanye West

Kanye West has been making waves with a number of highly publicized and controversial remarks recently, even sparking a parody on Saturday Night Live. Yet while the majority of Americans heard about West’s remarks, most are not impressed. According to a CNN poll conducted by SSRS, 72 percent of those polled said they heard about West’s recent remarks and tweets like this one on Donald Trump, slavery, and his pro-Trump political debate/single Ye vs. The People. Most people, 52 percent, though, think West’s real motivation is publicity, not politics. The majority of those Continue reading "Yes, CNN Has Released a Poll on What People Think of Kanye West"

#MetricShift Chat: Metrics That Should Matter vs. Metrics That Matter to Publishers

For this chat, we’re partnering with the analytics and audience insight platform Parse.ly to do a deep dive into what publishers care about — and roadblocks they face — when using metrics to make decisions. Parse.ly recently surveyed 270 brand, agency and publisher content professionals to reveal useful metrics, the silos of data access, and how analytics impact content they create. A full report can be found on their website. In our #MetricShift chat on Friday, February 24, starting at 1 p.m. ET / 12 p.m CT / 10 a.m. PT, we’ll talk with Parse.ly and editors who use the tool about the highlights and questions raised by the new publisher metrics report. The chat, which you can find by searching for #MetricShift on Twitter, will be moderated by Tim Cigelske, associate editor of metrics at MediaShift. Guests will include experts from Parse.ly and Continue reading "#MetricShift Chat: Metrics That Should Matter vs. Metrics That Matter to Publishers"

Everyone Is Shocked by Trump’s New ‘Mainstream Media Accountability Survey’: ‘It’s Deranged’

Screen Shot 2017-02-17 at 10.14.57 AM Donald trump and the GOP released a “Mainstream Media Accountability Poll” that more or less backs up his anti-press press conference from yesterday, even before the results are collected. Here are a few of the questions.

How CIR Measured Greater Awareness of Health Risks After Investigation

This post was written and originally published by CIR and is republished here with permission. Some stories change laws. Others force governments and companies to change their policies. Advocacy and interest groups often use these investigations in their own work. Still other stories change a community’s awareness of an issue. The first three examples of impact are real, discrete events we can measure. The last one – changing awareness of an issue – proves to be much more difficult to know for sure. How can a media organization really prove a project increased the public’s knowledge? And does this even matter for lasting social, political and cultural change? I wanted to measure how a piece of investigative reporting changed public awareness on an issue. So I designed a survey that reached residents both before and after the story published, then analyzed the data for changes in attitude. Here’s a rundown
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5 Lessons from Teaching Online and Hybrid Classes

Click on the image to read the whole series

Sometimes baby steps make learning easier. But not always. I remember getting the email with the news that my web design class was transitioning from traditional face-to-face to hybrid: half the students in the classroom, half online (synchronous). And the email, a couple of years later, that said the class was transitioning to 100 percent online (synchronous). The progression seems logical, on its face. But it’s not. The three forms — 100 percent classroom, partial classroom/online, 100 percent online — are very different environments. Add to the mix a class that includes applied computer skills (lab time) and the differences become more pronounced. Stick with me, and perhaps my experience will make yours less bumpy.
Photo by theunquietlibrarian on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.

Photo by theunquietlibrarian on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.

1. Get to know the online environment

Imagine, for a moment, that you had
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Photo by Tim PIerce on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.
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How much do you make? A CUNY grad student is collecting data on salaries in journalism

Julia Haslanger wants to know how much you make. Last Friday, Haslanger, a graduate student in CUNY’s social journalism program, released Journo Salary Sharer, which asks journalists to anonymously share their salary information in order to help start a conversation about how much people in different positions throughout the journalism world earn. “As journalists, we know how to talk to people. We just have to suck it up and be brave and ask other people how much they make,” Haslanger told me. “There’s only so much I can do. I’m one person who has one survey on one place on the Internet. But you, as a journalist, have skills to find that information. This is an excuse for journalists to go out and ask those questions and start those conversations.” The site has two parts. The first part is a survey that asks respondents about their
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