Want to Watch MySpace in Real Time? Here’s Your Site.

Despite MySpace’s well-documented woes, the site still attracts a very large audience. Want to see what they’re chatting about as they say it? Here you go: Real-time search engine Collecta has produced a site that does nothing but index MySpace users’ comments, shout-outs, videos, etc.

MySpace, along with Twitter, Facebook and other sites that collect real-time, user-generated stuff, has opened up its stream to third-party developers, which means Collecta isn’t the only place you can see what the social network’s users have to say.

But it is, as far as I can tell, the only site offering a dedicated vertical to MySpace. (Disclosure: MySpace is owned News Corp., which owns this Web site.)

collecta favre myspace

I’m still a little fuzzy about the endgame for Collecta, One Riot and all the other search start-ups that are mining real-time data. Each promises a different take on the problem: This one claims to be faster, that one says it’s more comprehensive, this one says it does a better job of sorting the data pouring out of the firehose, etc.

But it seems to me that the default winner should be Google (GOOG), which is able to index the real-time stuff and integrate it into its search results. And if Google screws that up somehow, the likely winner will be a site like Twitter or Facebook, sources for much of the data in the first place.

Then again, if we take this approach toward every new search development, there’s really no reason for anyone to innovate again. So more power to these guys for trying.

Fox Commenter Wants Muslim Profiling; Real World Fliers Remain Calm

airport-security1If there is one lesson to be gleaned thus far from Thursdays attempted terrorist attack on Northwestern Flight 253 it is this: when it comes to flying safely you may be on your own (notwithstanding the pilots and the ground staff!). According to ABC’s Jake Tapper the only thing Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab didn’t do to set off alarm bells was call the TSA himself and announce that he was going to attempt to blow up a plane over U.S. soil. Per Tapper’s Twitter:

# (4) Dec 24 he boards plan in Nigeria for roundtrip multiday flight to US WITH NO LUGGAGE about 11 hours ago from web

(3) Dec 16 he buys $3K ticket WITH CASH from KLM office in Ghana. Gives no address or contact info about 11 hours ago from web

Nov 20, US Embassy informs other embassies and US counterterrorism community, but all thats done is name put in database of 550K about 11 hours ago from web

(2) Nov 19, his father- a respected banker- reports son to US Embassy in Nigeria, says he’s being radicalized in Yemen…. about 11 hours ago from web

(1) May 09 UK denies him a visa for claiming he’d study at bogus university. Per Home Secy that immediately put him on watchlist in UK. about 11 hours ago from web

the video of our WN spot has yet to post. but we looked at 4 missed signals about Abdulmuttalab…here they are:…(contd) about 11 hours ago from web

Jaw-dropping, no? Also, this whole incident is sort of putting to rest the argument that the former administration had anything to do with the fact we have not been attacked in the last eight years. Anyway, with all this in mind, as well as yesterday’s revelation that Abdulmutallab was not put on the “no fly” watch list because “it was decided that there was insufficient information at that time based on existing watch list criteria” it may not be entirely surprising that the incident is bringing out, shall we say, certain people’s worser angels.

Case in point: Yesterday on Fox News conservative talking head Mike Gallagher, in an effort to address the “800 lbs gorilla in the room” suggested that there should be a separate line in airports for Muslims. (Video below.)

“Let’s do that with anyone named Abdul, or Mohammed, or Achmed, let’s take them and put them in a room and make sure they don’t have explosives sown into their underwear.”

I am going to hazard a guess that, alas, he is not alone in that thinking that’s a reasonable plan. However, for a slightly less hysterical, slightly more grounded (literally) reaction here is NPR’s Morning Edition report from the Dallas-Ft. Worth terminal where fliers appeared calm in the face of fear and frustrated in the face of increased security: Life goes on, and if you’ve got to fly, you’ve got to fly.


The Other Big Media Hoax Of The Day: Stonehenge Built In 1898!

00ag15w9Today is apparently media hoax day. Earlier today TMZ.com, they of the enormous scoops, looks to have gotten punk’d when they published an old photo of what appeared to be then-senator John F. Kennedy sunbathing on a ship filled with naked women. Alas (or not depending how rosy your view of Camelot is) the picture appears to be a fake. Well hold on to your hats folks, this isn’t the only fake picture making its way around the media world.

A Russian website has today posted photos of what appears to be an upcoming National Geographic spread, which purportedly uncovers photos of British authorities constructing Stonehenge in….1898. Gasp! Here is an Google English translation of the page. The photo spread, which online at least appears totally believable, alas (again) is a fake. NGmag twittered this earlier: “FYI: there is NO “Stonehenge is a Hoax” story coming out. Today is Dia de los Santos Inocentes/Childermas. Think “April Fools.”

According to Wikipedia Dia de los Santos Inocentes or Childermas is “a day to commemorate the killing of the Holy Innocents. Variously held on 28th December in the Western Church and 29th December in the Eastern Church. In Spanish speaking countries this is often a prank filled day like April Fools’ Day.” Stonehenge, meanwhile is (depending on whom you consult) a famous prehistoric burial ground and/or major British tourist attraction and/or subject of a famous Monty Python sketch and/or the landing spot of aliens. No doubt at least one of these groups is up in arms right now about the trumped up story. Those crazy Russian Childermas jokesters.

See all the photos here.


Twitter Reveals The Realities Of Increased Airport Security After Friday’s Attack

popupDespite the billions spent since 2001 on intelligence and counterterrorism programs, sophisticated airport scanners and elaborate watch lists, it was something simpler that averted disaster on a Christmas Day flight to Detroit: alert and courageous passengers and crew members.New York Times, Dec 26, 2009.

Now that the first shock of yesterday’s attempted bombing on Northwest Flight 253 has passed the real fallout is starting to take effect, mainly for regular travelers (like the ones who “averted disaster” yesterday) attempting travel across the country today. The Times and elsewhere are reporting on new travel restrictions, which were put in place almost immediately after yesterday’s incident was reported and it ain’t pretty:

Although transportation officials had not announced new security measures yet, Air Canada said the Transportation Security Agency would make significant changes to the way passengers are able to move about on aircraft. During the final hour of flight, customers will have to remain seated, will not be allowed access to carry-on baggage and cannot have personal belongings or other items on their laps, according to a notice on Air Canada’s Web site.

In effect, that means passengers on flights of about 90 minutes or less will not be able to get out of their seats, since they are not allowed to move about while an airplane is climbing to its cruising altitude.

In the words of Gawker’s Ryan Tate: “Airline passengers repeatedly do what TSA can’t — intercept terrorists — so let’s treat them even worse. Shameful.”

NPR reported earlier today that passengers appeared to be “taking it in stride and are very calm about it” but if you want a real sense of what it’s like to be in the air today (or waiting to be in the air today), beyond the cut and dry version the news outlets are offereing, then you need look no farther than Twitter. We put together a collection from across the Twittersphere to give you a sense of how these new restrictions are (or aren’t, as the case may be) affecting traveler’s ability to get where they’re going this holiday season.

Blogger Xeni Jardin perhaps (alas for her) provided the best report on the realities of international travel today.

Picture 7Picture 6Picture 5

Our own Rachel Sklar, who was flying domestic, noted there were less security measures than one might have presumed:

Picture 11Picture 1

Business Insider’s John Carney, meanwhile, was apparently just hoping to find a way to the snowed-in MidWest:

Picture 15Picture 3

And they were far from being the only ones.

Picture 17

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See anything you think we should add? Drop us a line at tips@mediaite.com. And safe travels!


Twitter Reveals The Realities Of Increased Airport Security After Yesterday’s Attack

popupDespite the billions spent since 2001 on intelligence and counterterrorism programs, sophisticated airport scanners and elaborate watch lists, it was something simpler that averted disaster on a Christmas Day flight to Detroit: alert and courageous passengers and crew members.New York Times, Dec 26, 2009.

Now that the first shock of yesterday’s attempted bombing on Northwest Flight 253 has passed the real fallout is starting to take effect, mainly for regular travelers (like the ones who “averted disaster” yesterday) attempting travel across the country today. The Times and elsewhere are reporting on new travel restrictions, which were put in place almost immediately after yesterday’s incident was reported and it ain’t pretty:

Although transportation officials had not announced new security measures yet, Air Canada said the Transportation Security Agency would make significant changes to the way passengers are able to move about on aircraft. During the final hour of flight, customers will have to remain seated, will not be allowed access to carry-on baggage and cannot have personal belongings or other items on their laps, according to a notice on Air Canada’s Web site.

In effect, that means passengers on flights of about 90 minutes or less will not be able to get out of their seats, since they are not allowed to move about while an airplane is climbing to its cruising altitude.

In the words of Gawker’s Ryan Tate: “Airline passengers repeatedly do what TSA can’t — intercept terrorists — so let’s treat them even worse. Shameful.”

NPR reported earlier today that passengers appeared to be “taking it in stride and are very calm about it” but if you want a real sense of what it’s like to be in the air today (or waiting to be in the air today), beyond the cut and dry version the news outlets are offereing, then you need look no farther than Twitter. We put together a collection from across the Twittersphere to give you a sense of how these new restrictions are (or aren’t, as the case may be) affecting traveler’s ability to get where they’re going this holiday season.

Blogger Xeni Jardin perhaps (alas for her) provided the best report on the realities of international travel today.

Picture 7Picture 6Picture 5

Our own Rachel Sklar, who was flying domestic, noted there were less security measures than one might have presumed:

Picture 11Picture 1

Business Insider’s John Carney, meanwhile, was apparently just hoping to find a way to the snowed in MidWest:

Picture 15Picture 3

And they were far from being the only ones.

Picture 17

Picture 18

See anything you think we should add? Drop us a line at tips@mediaite.com. And safe travels!


The Mediaite 50: Innovators And Influencers Who Shook Up 2009

Mediaite50The year 2009 had many media bright spots, break-out stars, dominating networks and game-changing technologies.  The Mediaite 50 collects the finest, most exemplary innovators and influencers of the year, defining a media moment in time and setting the agenda as we move forward.

There were many significant and ongoing narratives in the mediascape this year. The continued explosion of online media dovetailed with the continued collapse of print — Condé Nast ushered in the McKinsey executors while Gawker Media posted huge profits. Meanwhile, Newsweek tried to reinvent itself, the New York Times suffered another round of layoffs and a host of shuttered papers and magazines stopped cold. Online we saw huge acquisitions and gains, but not without growing pains: the net had its fair share of job cuts, too, as advertising slumped across the board. But as media critic David Carr put it, there’s an underlying wave of youth and optimism.

This year we also saw opinion media dominate traditional journalism in ways that no one would ever have expected. Fox News pulled further ahead of the competition with the continued success of Bill O’Reilly and a breakout year from Glenn Beck, not to mention the network’s similar domination of straight news blocks. The Huffington Post kept momentum from the kickstart of the 2008 election, while the right feasted on a first year president.

Pop culture had its moments, too — not all of them pretty, in fact, most pretty ugly — from Balloon Boy and Kanye “Jackass” West to Rihanna and the death of Michael Jackson. As a result, gossip blogs had another stellar year and TMZ led the pack. Then came MTV’s latest gem.

It often seemed like a rough year — maybe a fitting end to a tough decade — but that doesn’t mean there weren’t bright spots. We saw innovation, redemption and reconciliation, and the tactful and savvy rose to the top of the media heap. The Mediaite 50 collects what our editorial staff saw as the finest, most exemplary innovators and influencers of the year, defining a media moment in time and setting the agenda as we move forward.

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