George Jedenoff: A 101-Year-Old TidBITS Reader


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Adam Engst:
While helping a TidBITS member with a login problem recently, Lauri Reinhardt learned something fascinating. The reader, an amiable gentleman named George Jedenoff, was almost 102 years old. There may be an estimated 72,000 centenarians in the United States, but still, 101 years old! Can you imagine the history he has lived through? When Lauri relayed this fact, I knew I had to talk with George to find out more about him and his life, and he graciously agreed.
What a great story.

Introducing Guardian Firewall for iOS


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Guardian Firewall, from Will Strafach, who’s long been at the forefront of investigating iOS security and privacy issues:
Starting over 2 years ago, we embarked on an ambitious mission: Build a tool that allows any electronic device owner in the world to take back control of their digital privacy. This tool needed to be incredibly easy to use, straightforward, and must allow a user to “set it and forget it” if they did not want to apply any customizations. We could have cut plenty of corners and shipped an acceptable tool. Instead we took our time and did things right, putting together the most powerful tool and dataset we were capable of building. Why? Because we are working towards a broader set of goals: Make surveillance capitalism an untenable business model. Degrade the quality of shadow profiles maintained on every user of an internet connected device. Methodically expose every bad Continue reading "Introducing Guardian Firewall for iOS"

Charlie Warzel: ‘You Care More About Your Privacy Than You Think’


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Charlie Warzel, writing for The New York Times:
Svirsky ran a series of tests where he had participants fill out online surveys for money and made them decide whether to share their Facebook profile data with a survey taker in exchange for a bonus (in some cases, 50 cents). In a direct trade-off scenario, Svirsky found that 64 percent of participants refused to share their Facebook profile in exchange for 50 cents and a majority were “unwilling to share their Facebook data for $2.50.” In sum: Respondents generally sacrificed a small bonus to keep from turning over personal information. But things changed when Svirsky introduced the smallest bit of friction. When participants were faced with what he calls “a veiled trade-off,” where survey takers had to click to learn whether taking the survey without connecting to Facebook would be free or cost them 50 cents, only 40 percent Continue reading "Charlie Warzel: ‘You Care More About Your Privacy Than You Think’"

Charlie Warzel: ‘You Care More About Your Privacy Than You Think’


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Charlie Warzel, writing for The New York Times:
Svirsky ran a series of tests where he had participants fill out online surveys for money and made them decide whether to share their Facebook profile data with a survey taker in exchange for a bonus (in some cases, 50 cents). In a direct trade-off scenario, Svirsky found that 64 percent of participants refused to share their Facebook profile in exchange for 50 cents and a majority were “unwilling to share their Facebook data for $2.50.” In sum: Respondents generally sacrificed a small bonus to keep from turning over personal information. But things changed when Svirsky introduced the smallest bit of friction. When participants were faced with what he calls “a veiled trade-off,” where survey takers had to click to learn whether taking the survey without connecting to Facebook would be free or cost them 50 cents, only 40 percent Continue reading "Charlie Warzel: ‘You Care More About Your Privacy Than You Think’"

What a Remarkable Comeback


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Nolan O’Brien, writing for Twitter’s engineering blog on using Catalyst to port Twitter’s iOS app to the Mac:
Mac users are some of the most engaged people on Twitter, and we are thrilled to introduce them to a new fully native Mac app that has full feature parity with our other platforms plus amazing new features. Expect great things like resizable windows with dynamic content, multiple windows support, native notifications, drag & drop and keyboard support. There may even be a few new exciting features we haven’t been able to build for mobile devices that we’re excited to share in the fall!
Resizable windows, drag and drop support, keyboard support. Wow! What a great testimony to Catalyst that Mac users can expect such advanced features. Maybe we’ll even be able to copy and paste text.

What a Remarkable Comeback


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Nolan O’Brien, writing for Twitter’s engineering blog on using Catalyst to port Twitter’s iOS app to the Mac:
Mac users are some of the most engaged people on Twitter, and we are thrilled to introduce them to a new fully native Mac app that has full feature parity with our other platforms plus amazing new features. Expect great things like resizable windows with dynamic content, multiple windows support, native notifications, drag & drop and keyboard support. There may even be a few new exciting features we haven’t been able to build for mobile devices that we’re excited to share in the fall!
Resizable windows, drag and drop support, keyboard support. Wow! What a great testimony to Catalyst that Mac users can expect such advanced features. Maybe we’ll even be able to copy and paste text.

In Court, Facebook Blames Users for Destroying Right to Privacy


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Sam Biddle, reporting for The Intercept:
Representing Facebook before U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria was Orin Snyder of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, who claimed that the plaintiffs’ charges of privacy invasion were invalid because Facebook users have no expectation of privacy on Facebook. The simple act of using Facebook, Snyder claimed, negated any user’s expectation of privacy. […] At one point Chhabria asked, seemingly unable to believe Snyder’s argument himself, “If Facebook promises not to disseminate anything that you send to your hundred friends, and Facebook breaks that promise and disseminates your photographs to a thousand corporations, that would not be a serious privacy invasion?” Snyder didn’t blink: “Facebook does not consider that to be actionable, as a matter of law under California law.”
Like I wrote a few weeks ago, get these Facebook fuckers in court and all of a sudden they tell the truth.

Samsung Advises Smart TV Owners to Periodically Check for Viruses


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Samsung, in a now-deleted tweet:
Scanning your computer for malware viruses is important to keep it running smoothly. This also is true for your QLED TV if it’s connected to Wi-Fi! Prevent malicious software attacks on your TV by scanning for viruses on your TV every few weeks. Here’s how.
Television sets infected with malicious software sounds like something straight out of 1980s dystopic sci-fi. Makes me wonder how much debate there was within Apple about partnering with Samsung to put iTunes on these things.

MacStadium


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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My thanks to MacStadium for sponsoring this week at DF (as well as my show from WWDC last week). MacStadium is the leading provider of enterprise-class Apple Mac infrastructure providing scalable, reliable, and secure private clouds and dedicated servers for workloads that require MacOS. MacStadium is trusted by iOS developers, mobile testing teams, and network engineers around the world. By combining patented technology, proprietary configurations, and unparalleled expertise in Apple infrastructure, MacStadium can meet the needs of any business from growing startups to large enterprises that require Mac hardware for iOS/Mac app development needs. Coming soon from MacStadium is Orka — Orchestration with Kubernetes on Apple — a new virtualization layer for Mac build infrastructure based on Docker and Kubernetes technology. Currently in beta, Orka will be released later this summer. MacStadium is a long-time supporter of Daring Fireball, and there’s simply no question in my mind that they are the experts Continue reading "MacStadium"

‘The Nerds Apple Listens To’


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Hannes Schrader wrote a piece for Zeit Online about my live show at WWDC, and Apple’s relationship with podcasters and writers who follow the company. I usually hate reading about myself, but Schrader’s story is just terrific — he really captures the gestalt of the event. The original story is in German, but Google Translate does a remarkably good job at turning it into English:
There are a few men who call themselves nerds and talk about Apple like others about football. And Apple has been listening for some time.

Rick Wilson on Trump


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Rick Wilson, writing at The Daily Beast:
We live in a world of counterfactuals, hypotheticals, and more tu quoque scenarios than a reasonable person can process. That said, I have to beg my Republican friends to imagine — just for a moment — what you’d be doing if Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama said they would accept the help of a foreign power in a campaign and not report it to the FBI. I’ll tell you what you’d do: You’d lose your fucking shit. You’d spurt blood from your goddamn eyes.
The obvious but difficult truth is that Trump and his Republican cohorts are not interested in free and fair elections. They see our democracy as a game to rig, not an ideal to uphold. These Republicans don’t view Democrats as their political opponents; they view them as their enemies.

The New Wilderness


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Essential reading from Maciej Ceglowski:
This odd situation recalls the cigarette ads in the 1930’s in which tobacco companies brought out rival doctors to argue over which brand was most soothing to the throat. No two companies have done more to drag private life into the algorithmic eye than Google and Facebook. Together, they operate the world’s most sophisticated dragnet surveillance operation, a duopoly that rakes in nearly two thirds of the money spent on online ads. You’ll find their tracking scripts on nearly every web page you visit. They can no more function without surveillance than Exxon Mobil could function without pumping oil from the ground. So why have the gravediggers of online privacy suddenly grown so worried about the health of the patient? Part of the answer is a defect in the language we use to talk about privacy. That language, especially as it is codified in law, Continue reading "The New Wilderness"

The New Dropbox Sucks


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Dropbox:
Today, we’re unveiling the new Dropbox. It’s the Dropbox you know and love, but better. It’s a single workspace to organize your content, connect your tools, and bring everyone together, wherever you are. The first thing you’ll notice is an all-new Dropbox desktop app that we’re introducing today through our early access program. It’s more than an app, though — it’s a completely new experience.
I don’t want any of this. All I want from Dropbox is a folder that syncs perfectly across my devices and allows sharing with friends and colleagues. That’s it: a folder that syncs with sharing. And that’s what Dropbox was. Now it’s a monstrosity that embeds its own incredibly resource-heavy web browser engine. In a sense Steve Jobs was right — the old Dropbox was a feature not a product. But it was a feature well-worth paying for, and which made millions of people very happy. If iCloud Continue reading "The New Dropbox Sucks"

Apple’s Swift Era Begins


This post is by John Gruber from Daring Fireball


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Brent Simmons:
I’m surely not the only person to think, all week long, that this WWDC marks the end of Apple’s NeXT era and the beginning of the Swift era. […] Even if you’ve been writing mostly in Swift the last few years, you’re still writing in a NeXT context. Your apps still live in that world, whether you know it or not. Your apps are still Objective-C apps in a very real sense.
We can quibble about whether to call the old era Apple’s “NeXT era” or “Objective-C” era. I think it works better to compare language to language, frameworks to frameworks. But it’s the same point. SwiftUI and Combine (and whatever else is yet to come) are that big of a change. We’ll probably see a lot of Mac apps ported from iPadOS using Catalyst. Some of them — games in particular — might even be good Mac Continue reading "Apple’s Swift Era Begins"