“It’s just become daily news”: Six Florida newsrooms are teaming up to cover climate change


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


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In Florida, climate change is a local news story. The state’s 21 million residents are already feeling the effects of a heating planet, including not just higher temperatures but more and stronger hurricanes, toxic algae, sunny-day flooding, and sea level rise. And climate change will cost Florida more than any other state — an estimated $76 billion by 2040. “The environment is ever-present here,” said Tom Hudson, vice president of news at WLRN Public Media, the main public radio station for South Florida and the Keys. “It’s not a science story for us here in South Florida. It’s not some kind of theoretical exploration. It’s real. It’s what many in our community experience in their neighborhoods. It’s just become daily news.” Now six Florida news organizations — The Miami Herald, South Florida Sun Sentinel, Tampa Bay Times, Palm Beach Post, Orlando Sentinel, and WLRN Continue reading "“It’s just become daily news”: Six Florida newsrooms are teaming up to cover climate change"

Could technology built for advertising make public radio less top-down and more bottom-up?


This post is by Nicholas Quah from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 215, published June 25, 2019. This piece’s roots can be traced back to summer 2016, when the Indiana public radio station WBAA announced that, as a response to the show’s exclusive then-new streaming partnership with Pandora, it would no longer carry This American Life on its airwaves. The station argued that TAL’s distribution partnership threatened to undermine public radio’s broadcast model. That threat was driven by Pandora’s profit-seeking disposition, its scale, and most importantly, its disruptive structure as a digital distributor that goes around terrestrial stations like WBAA and directly to audiences. WBAA would later reverse its decision, citing “considerable listener feedback,” and TAL continues to stream exclusively over Pandora to this day. (Which also means, by the way, that you can’t listen to the show on podcast-expansionary Spotify. Though, interestingly, you can find a genre in
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Can you spot a fake photo online? Your level of experience online matters a lot more than contextual clues


This post is by Mona Kasra from Nieman Lab


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It can be hard to tell whether a picture is real. Consider, as the participants in our recent research did, these two images and see whether you think neither, either, or both of them has been doctored. You might have based your assessment of the images on the visual information alone. Or perhaps you factored in your evaluation of how reputable the source is, or the number of people who liked and shared the images. My collaborators and I recently studied how people evaluate the credibility of images that accompany online stories and what elements figure into that evaluation. We found that you’re far less likely to fall for fake images if you’re more experienced with the internet, digital photography, and online media platforms — if you have what scholars call “digital media literacy.”

Who is duped by fakes?

Were you duped? Both of the images are fake. We
The Conversation
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Publishers will soon no longer be able to detect when you’re in Chrome’s incognito mode, weakening paywalls everywhere


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


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Ever fall into this trap? (1) You hit a news site’s paywall; (2) being a sneak, you open up the web page in an incognito browser window to get around it; but (3) the news site can tell you’re in incognito mode, figures you’re up to no good, and blocks the story you’re trying to read. Well, (3) is about to go away in the web’s most popular browser; the countdown to your sweet release is on. (Or, you know, you could subscribe.) The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, and The Dallas Morning News — among others — all employ some version of such an incognito catcher. The next version of Google Chrome, due out on July 30, will stop them, rendering their metered paywalls significantly leakier. (In other news: Publishers, apply now for some Google News Initiative dollars! Google’s looking for “creative
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R.I.P. Quartz Brief, the innovative mobile news app. Maybe “chatting with the news” isn’t something most people really want to do?


This post is by Joshua Benton from Nieman Lab


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Quartz Brief, the truly original mobile news app built around a chat interface and bots pre-fed with human prose, will die July 1, Digiday has reported. It was 3 years old. It is survived by a different app that last year took its predecessor’s name — just plain ol’ Quartz — and a lengthy list of laudatory tweets from media people like me. When the Quartz app debuted in 2016, it was immediately clear that it would be a big step away from the news app mainstream. No list of headlines here; a first-time user saw what looked like a chat interface, familiar from whatever app they use to trade barbs with friends, and a sort of textual uncanny valley: Am I talking with a bot? A person? A news organization? The answer was a combination of all three. In real time, the app’s prose was being
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As of December, publishers will no longer be allowed to send out newsletters on WhatsApp


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In an effort to crack down on “automated or bulk messaging, or non-personal use” on the platform, WhatsApp will no longer allow publishers to send out newsletters through the app as of December 7, 2019. WhatsApp banned bulk message forwarding earlier this year in an effort to cut down on the spread of misinformation on the platform. Newsletters had been a gray area on WhatsApp, and news publishers that were sending them out had known that the platform could put an end to them at some point. While the change applies globally, it seems to be attracting particular attention in Germany. IJNet Continue reading "As of December, publishers will no longer be allowed to send out newsletters on WhatsApp"

“First-generation fact-checking” is no longer good enough. Here’s what comes next


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

“Fact checkers need to move from ‘publish and pray’ to ‘publish and act.'” “The idea that fact checking can work by correcting the public’s inaccurate beliefs on a mass scale alone doesn’t stack up,” write representatives from Full Fact (U.K.), Africa Check (Africa), and Chequeado (Argentina), in a manifesto of sorts published Thursday to all three sites. “First-generation fact-checking” — the approach of simply publishing fact-checks, which sites like FactCheck.org do — is a worthy effort, the authors write, but it isn’t enough if you actually want to change people’s minds. “Nobody should be surprised when, despite fact checkers publishing lots of fact checks, people still believe inaccurate things and politicians Continue reading "“First-generation fact-checking” is no longer good enough. Here’s what comes next"

Political news sites are reaching across the aisle (to try and pull some cash out of Google and Facebook’s pockets)


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


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Who says bipartisanship is dead? Today’s lions-laying-down-with-lambs moment is a cross-ideological alliance that has the Tucker Carlson-founded Daily Caller working with Mediaite, Raw Story, and others to attempt to wrestle advertising dollars away from the usual suspects. The Wall Street Journal’s Lukas I. Alpert had the story of a political news partnership:
The alliance will offer marketers custom ad packages aimed at politically engaged readers, they said. “This is a way to try to bring some of the ad dollars now being directed at the tech behemoths back to midsize political publishers,” said Andrew Eisbrouch, the chief operating officer and general counsel at Law & Crime [and Mediaite]. “We want to offer a package that is different from what a marketer can get on Facebook or Google.” […] Political ad spending for the 2020 election cycle is expected to hit a record high of $9.9 billion, Continue reading "Political news sites are reaching across the aisle (to try and pull some cash out of Google and Facebook’s pockets)"

Congratulations to Slack, the now-public company that keeps thousands of newsrooms humming


This post is by Joshua Benton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Who said there’s no money in journalism? Sure, maybe the old ad model is decaying, and maybe hundreds of newspapers are on death watch — but the work-chat app Slack has been able to build a multi-billion-dollar business at least in some tiny part based on its remarkable uptake in newsrooms around the world. Slack becomes a publicly traded company today — through a DPO (direct public offering) rather than an IPO (initial public offering), a screw-the-banks, help-our-current-employees-and-backers move that fits well with the early-web vibes the company has given off since launch. (CEO Stewart Butterfield previously co-founded Flickr; after Yahoo acquired it, he left that company with one of history’s most entertaining resignation letters. For me, he and other Slack folk like Cal Henderson and Matt Haughey have always evoked a kinder, gentler version of the Internet from the late 1990s and early 2000s, and I think
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Pico wants to inject CRM smarts into news sites hungry for reader relationships


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When some people start reporting a story, they start by googling the topic. I start by searching it in the Nieman Lab archives. Sometimes you find a plot twist. Pico came on my radar with some emails from the cofounder, Jason Bade, and the news that the Lenfest Institute was providing the startup with $50,000 to test marketing experiments for publishers. As a CRM for media companies, Pico is trying to fill the tech needs that publishers have in building relationships with reader revenue (and the readers behind it, of course). It also recently raised $4.5 million from Stripe, Axel Springer, and others. The only — until I hit publish on this [ahem, you mean “my editor” —Ed.]piece mentioning Pico on our website includes this bit, a not particularly auspicious debut:
Any startup you work with is going to have its own problems. The Austin Continue reading "Pico wants to inject CRM smarts into news sites hungry for reader relationships"

Twitter is turning off location data on tweets — a small win for privacy but a small loss for journalists and researchers


This post is by Joshua Benton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When Twitter wants to announce a change in how it does things, how should they announce it? With a tweet, naturally: Twitter is removing the ability of its users to geotag their tweets. A tweet may seem like a simple data construct — just 280 characters! — but there’s a sea of metadata sloshing around each bon mot. And since 2009, one of those bits of metadata was the location from which the tweet was posted. The goal? To let you “better focus in on local conversations.” Location was opt-in, meaning it was disabled by default and users had to Continue reading "Twitter is turning off location data on tweets — a small win for privacy but a small loss for journalists and researchers"

“News unfolds like a saga”: The French news site Les Jours wants to marry narrative, depth, and investigative reporting


This post is by Olivier Holmey from Nieman Lab


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Synopsis, soundtrack, episode, mood: This is the language used daily within the Parisian offices of the French news site Les Jours. But don’t let its vocabulary fool you: While the three-year-old media company borrows many of the codes of screenplays and visual fiction, it actually runs a hard-hitting investigative news site. The shared lingo is no coincidence. When the co-founders of Les Jours were secretly planning their departure from Libération — the French daily where eight of the nine of them used to work — with the intention of creating a news site devoted to deep reporting, they approached not only fellow journalists for advice, but screenwriters too. The reason was simple: Their big idea was to serialize the news, breaking stories down into nail-biting episode after nail-biting episode that would make long-form investigative journalism more accessible, and more exciting, to readers. “The founding principle is
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What will Libra, Facebook’s new cryptocurrency, mean for news?


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


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Facebook is pitching its new cryptocurrency, Libra — which will be officially launched in 2020 — as a way for the world’s unbanked to save, send, and spend money. To some, it’s also a massive power grab by an already immensely powerful company (and a bunch of other powerful companies — Libra’s 27 initial partners include Visa, Mastercard, Uber, Lyft, and Paypal, among others) and a potential privacy nightmare. But what might it mean for payments for news? Of Libra’s 27 initial partners, only one — Spotify — is a media company, although the list also includes VCs like Andreessen Horowitz and Union Square Ventures which have invested in media companies. “Facebook hopes its Continue reading "What will Libra, Facebook’s new cryptocurrency, mean for news?"

Meet TikTok: How The Washington Post, NBC News, and The Dallas Morning News are using the of-the-moment platform


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Tired of the trolls and infinite screaming on Twitter? Try the infinite video memes on TikTok — perhaps the most successful new social platform among American young people since Snapchat more than a half-decade ago. And as with Snapchat before it, news organizations are trying to figure out a way in — wading into the duet-laden waters of the newest Next Big Thing, where Generation Z is applying makeup Michael Jackson-style to the tune of Marina and the Diamonds’ “I Am Not a Robot,” recreating their most extreme morning routine to Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5,” dressing up their pets of all sizes with Lizzo’s “Boys,” and more. TikTok is old enough to have guides and explainers in The New York Times, The Verge, The Wall Street Journal, and Slate, among others — read those if you want the full how-to. But for context, TikTok is
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Audiobooks are no longer exempt from the broader shifts in the podcast world


This post is by Nicholas Quah from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 214, published June 18, 2019. Mary Meeker presented the 2019 edition of her Internet Trends report at the Code Conference last week, and podcasting pops up for a slide, grouped together with smart speakers as part of the broader voice trend. You can find the whole deck here. I’d recommend checking out the Nieman Lab and Recode writeups. Turns out American adults spend a daily average of around six hours on digital media these days. My burnt-out eyes, I would never have known.
Speaking of Vox: Vox Media has ratified its first collective bargaining agreement with the Writer’s Guild of America, East. You can view the (rather impressive!) terms here. I imagine this development has some ramifications for the process at Gimlet Media (brought to you by Spotify), which is also organizing through WGA East.
Audiobooks are
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The Atlantic introduces a “daily idea” for smart speakers


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Atlantic is launching a new skill for Amazon Echo and Google Home: A “single, illuminating idea” every weekday. From the release:
Every weekday, when people ask their smart speakers to play The Atlantic’s Daily Idea, they’ll hear a condensed, one-to two-minute read of an Atlantic story, be it “An Artificial Intelligence Developed Its Own Non-Human Language” or “The Case for Locking Up Your Smartphone.” The skill will include reporting from across The Atlantic’s science, tech, health, family, and education sections, as well as the magazine’s archives, representing the work of dozens of writers.
The Atlantic’s briefing joins a number of other offerings from publishers. But while ownership of the devices is increasing — an estimated 65 million U.S. adults, around 23 percent of the population over 12, own one; 12 percent of U.S. adults said they used one in the past
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Why do some people avoid news? Because they don’t trust us — or because they don’t think we add value to their lives?


This post is by Joshua Benton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The modern digitally connected human (Homo smartphonicus, identifiable by its trademark slumped shoulders and bleary eyes) has access to more news and information than any other human in history, whenever they want it, most of it free, all of it in their pocket. But it’s not only news that they have more access to — it’s everything, from Clash of Clans to Keanu memes to old friends’ photos to Ariana Grande songs to TikTok. Those things, if administered correctly, serve as entertainment and tend to make their consumers happy. News, you may have noticed, isn’t that great at generating happiness these days. So lots of people are happy to stick to Keanu and avoid Trump/Iran/Putin/climate change/mass shootings/Brexit/racism entirely.

News outlets will need public support to battle governments set on chilling investigative journalism


This post is by Michael J. Socolow from Nieman Lab


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Sometimes the best journalism tells us the worst news. The United States has a tradition of learning troubling news through extraordinary reporting efforts from combat zones. During the Vietnam War, award-winning journalism revealed the slaughter of Vietnamese civilians by American soldiers at My Lai. More recently, reports describing the torture and abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib in Iraq embarrassed the U.S. government. Such investigative reporting ultimately helped American citizens hold accountable those charged with acting in their name. But that didn’t mean the news was welcome, or even appreciated, at the time. It’s important to recall these examples in light of the raid by the Australian Federal Police at the headquarters of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation on June 5. As an American Fulbright Research Scholar studying media at the University of Canberra in Australia, I’ve watched this controversy closely. Comparing the way these two western democracies protect —
The Conversation
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As the Christchurch massacre trial begins, New Zealand news orgs vow to keep white supremacist ideology out of their coverage


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As the trial of the man accused of the Christchurch mosque massacres began a few hours ago, New Zealand’s major media organizations had a plan. They will refuse to run coverage in which the accused and his supporters champion white supremacist or terrorist ideology. They won’t cover, broadcast, or print messages, “imagery, symbols, or signals (including hand signals)” made by the accused or his supporters during the trial. They also won’t cover the shooter’s manifesto, a document that made its way around the Internet following the March shooting in which 51 people were killed and which has since been banned in New Zealand. The shooter, who livestreamed the massacre on Facebook, faces 51 counts of murder, 40 counts of attempted murder, and one terrorism charge. (In a move some found surprising, he pled not guilty to all charges today, which means a lengthy trial is now set to begin in
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Populists prefer television to online news — but are sticking to Facebook as others leave


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




“Populists prefer to use television news,” and they’re also spending more time on Facebook. This week, Oxford’s Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism released its annual Digital News Report, a good chunk of which focuses on partisan news, fake news, and trust in the media. (We covered the highlights from the rest of the report here.) Some interesting findings: — People are worried about fake news (no surprise) and claim they are switching to “more reputable” sources. (Note: “The interpretation of ‘reputable,’ ‘less accurate,’ ‘dubious,’ and other subjective terms were left
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