I want bad news and I want it fast: That’s the business model for Factal, a business-focused company from the founders of Breaking News


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


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Breaking News, which sent out news alerts from around the globe 24 hours a day, was beloved, but that wasn’t enough to save it. The company, consisting of a Twitter feed (with 9.1 million followers), app, and website, was shut down by its owner, NBC News, at the end of 2016. From a memo to employees at the time, in part:
Breaking News has built up a large following among journalists, government workers, industries whose success depends on accurate and fast news, and news junkies of all types from around the globe. Unfortunately, despite its consumer appeal, Breaking News has not been able to generate enough revenue to sustain itself.
A little under two years later, the founders of Breaking News think they’ve found a way to bring back the product (sort of) while making money. Cory Bergman announced Tuesday that he and Ben Tesch are launching Factal, Continue reading "I want bad news and I want it fast: That’s the business model for Factal, a business-focused company from the founders of Breaking News"

With “My WSJ,” The Wall Street Journal makes a personalized content feed central to its app


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


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When you think about the apps you most commonly use on your phone, a lot of them have one thing in common: They need you to be any good. Facebook, Spotify, your email and calendar apps — none of them are really of any use without your login. “Take you out of these apps and they become useless,” said Phil Izzo, the deputy chief news editor at The Wall Street Journal. And so when, in recent months, the Journal began redesigning its mobile app, personalization was one of the most important considerations. The ultimate result, released in an iOS 11 update last month, was My WSJ, a feed that’s the second panel after the homescreen and that uses AI to offer a customized list of stories based on users’ previous reading habits. “We wanted to see how we can thread general app trends into the Journal’s app,” said Continue reading "With “My WSJ,” The Wall Street Journal makes a personalized content feed central to its app"

Netizen Report: Travel Ban Nearly Keeps Yemeni Blogger From Accepting Free Press Award


This post is by Global Voices Advocacy Netizen Report Team from MediaShift


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Global Voices Advocacy’s Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world. Yemeni blogger Afrah Nasser was awarded this year’s International Free Press Award for her work covering the conflict in Yemen despite the many obstacles faced by journalists in the country. But Nasser, who also holds Swedish citizenship, was nearly unable to attend the awards ceremony in New York in person, because of the US travel ban on Yemeni nationals. After three applications and many letters in support of her application, Nasser finally obtained her visa from the US Embassy in Stockholm, where she resides. On Twitter, she remarked:
I never really had faith in the power of media & public opinion as I have today. Makes me think of people who don’t enjoy my high media profile. This is why, we need to get the tragedy in Yemen as
Continue reading "Netizen Report: Travel Ban Nearly Keeps Yemeni Blogger From Accepting Free Press Award"

DigitalEd: Use Google Apps to Workflow Like a Pro


This post is by Gideon Grudo from MediaShift


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Title: DigitalEd: Use Google Apps to Workflow Like a Pro
Instructor: Gideon Grudo, Digital Platforms Editor, Air Force Magazine
Working dumb is for the old guard. Work smart and defeat foes.
Running your newsroom with emails and word documents is so 2000-late. There’s a sexy and free way to plan ahead, communicate effectively, and come out actually knowing what your next issue will look like. A DC-based digital platforms editor will tell you how to use Google Apps to take over the world. He’s done it at his college paper, an alternative weekly, and most recently at a monthly magazine. What you’ll learn from this training:
  1. What are Google Apps and why are they important to poor newsrooms
  2. Why a shared-access management terminal is the best way for small teams to collaborate.
  3. How to use Google Drive, Google Sheets, and Google Docs for publications
Handouts:
  • Presentation slides (Powerpoint)
Who should take this training:

Now you can take a 24-hour Trump news “snooze” on the Quartz app


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve started feeling panicky every day between 5 and 6 p.m. because the volume of Trump news and notifications are just too much, there is a solution for you in the Quartz iPhone app: The app was updated Tuesday to let users turn on a “24-hour political timeout” that will not show them any news or notifications about DJT for one full relaxing day. The offering comes at a time when the phones of news junkies — or even just people who have both The Washington Post and The New York Times’ apps installed on their phones — blow up regularly. (See: Nieman Lab staff, 5:45 p.m. during a recent solemn event.) Last week, Continue reading "Now you can take a 24-hour Trump news “snooze” on the Quartz app"

Aplicativo permite que usuários deem 1 tempo de notícias sobre Donald Trump


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


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Se você começou a sentir pânico todos os dias entre 17h e 18h por causa do volume de notícias sobre Donald Trump e excesso de notificações, há uma solução para você no aplicativo para IPhone Quartz: Ele foi atualizado na última 3ª feira (23.mai.2017) e agora permite que os usuários ativem uma pausa da política por 24h, que não lhes mostrará nenhuma notícia ou notificação sobre Trump por 1 dia inteiro. A oferta surge em 1 tempo em que os telefones de viciados em notícias –ou até mesmo pessoas que têm os aplicativos de The Washington Post e The New York Times instalados em seus celulares– recebem várias notificações regularmente. Semana passada, o Times até experimentou Continue reading "Aplicativo permite que usuários deem 1 tempo de notícias sobre Donald Trump"

Mobile Journalism Isn’t Just Producing Content. It’s Knowing How Mobile Content Affects Engagement.


This post is by Ronald Yaros from MediaShift


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Story Highlights
  • Mobile analytics are good. Understanding how mobile structures affect mobile analytics is better.
  • Teaching the production of good mobile video is only a part of mobile journalism.
  • Stories with a photo or video followed by pages of text don’t inform scanning mobile users.
If you made it to this sentence and keep reading, that’s due, in part, to your specific interest in mobile and/or journalism. But if a scanning user without such an interest encounters this topic as one in a variety of topics, the structure of this post plays a critical role in user engagement. Researching and teaching mobile journalism to undergraduates since 2011 has provided me with more insights into engagement than any book or webinar could. An audience analytics class later convinced me that the best writing or video alone may not engage the largest mobile audience possible. Complicating the teaching of mobile journalism is “best practices”
Yaros Class
Continue reading "Mobile Journalism Isn’t Just Producing Content. It’s Knowing How Mobile Content Affects Engagement."

With Push, small publishers have a cheaper, quicker way to develop their own mobile apps


This post is by Ricardo Bilton from Nieman Lab


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Does every news organization need an app? It’s been a sticky question since Apple opened up the App Store nearly a decade ago. The app pendulum has swung in both directions multiple times over the years: For some publishers, apps remain an essential part of the distribution formula, while for others, developing an app is a waste of time and resources. Christopher Guess can’t say if developing a news app is always the right call, but he wants to make doing so within reach for any news organization that opts to invest in one. Guess is the developer behind Push, an open source iOS and Android app designed to cut down on the time and effort it takes for news organizations to develop news apps. It’s aimed at small-and mid-sized teams that lack the developer resources and capital to create their own apps from scratch. By Guess’s estimation, the
Continue reading "With Push, small publishers have a cheaper, quicker way to develop their own mobile apps"

Encrypted Messaging App’s Downloads Have Doubled Since Trump’s Election


This post is by David Bixenspan from Mediaite


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Signal logo While not the only mobile app for encrypted text and voice messaging, Open Whisper System’s implementation of secure messaging, Signal, has gained more and more traction as the go-to private messaging platform as of late. At least in recent days, that buzz is likely in light of certain internet privacy protections being rolled back by President Trump. The uptick in adoption is not just perception, either, as it’s clearly paid off in increasing the app’s user base. For starters, according to a report from recode on Tuesday, downloads of the app have spiked since Election Day. In addition, if you combine downloads from both Apple’s App Store and Google Play, there were 1.4 million downloads of Signal in the first quarter of 2017, close to double the same figure last year. Perhaps most tellingly, the biggest day for Signal was Inauguration Day, when the app was in nineteenth place for Continue reading "Encrypted Messaging App’s Downloads Have Doubled Since Trump’s Election"

RJI Futures Lab #186: Mobile Studio and Teleprompter App Bigvu


This post is by Rachel Wise from MediaShift


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Bigvu is an app designed to be a mobile studio for video journalists in the field. It combines a teleprompter with a platform for recording, managing and publishing the videos. Reporting by Gabe Dubois

For more information:
  • Bigvu is being used by several publishers in Europe, including France24, TraceTV, NextPlz, SportYou and Kangai. Spanish news organization 20 Minutos garnered 1.3 million views with the first 11 clips it produced using Bigvu.
  • A post on the Bigvu website outlines seven types of original videos users can produce to drive engagement. Among these examples are breaking news, testimonials and explanation videos.
  • Bigvu is available for both iOS and Android devices.
  Rachel Wise is an editor at the Futures Lab at the Reynolds Journalism Institute and co-producer of
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Futures Lab #184: Wall Street Journal’s Daydream VR App


This post is by Rachel Wise from MediaShift


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Experiencing the WSJ inside a virtual 3-D environment. The Wall Street Journal recently launched a VR app that allows users to experience the Journal in immersive 3-D in Google’s Daydream platform. The app is one of the first to deliver news and live market data inside a virtual 3-D environment. We speak with Himesh Patel, Dow Jones creative director, and Roger Kenny, design tech lead for VR at the Wall Street Journal, about how the app came together. Reporting by Reuben Stern, Rachel Wise and Gabe Dubois

For more information:

RJI Futures Lab #175: Shortcut from ‘This American Life’ Helps Listeners Share Clips


This post is by Rachel Wise from MediaShift


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Reporting by Hailey Godburn. A new tool called Shortcut from This American Life allows listeners to share clips from episodes of This American Life. Users can select text from episode transcripts, which the app turns into short videos that can be downloaded or posted to social media.

For more information:
  • Shortcut is a web app that works on desktop and mobile.
  • The team refers to the short videos created by the app as “audio gifs.”
  • The idea for Shortcut came from a hackathon hosted by This American Life in September 2015. About 80 audio journalists and hackers — comprising 30 percent people of color and 50 percent women — came together to brainstorm solutions of how to make podcasts more shareable and digestible.
  • While the primary goal was making audio more shareable, This American Life producer and Shortcut project lead Stephanie Foo says she also hopes it helps attract
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When 9.4 million followers isn’t enough: NBC News will shut down the Breaking News app on Dec. 31


This post is by Nieman Lab Staff from Nieman Lab


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There’s no denying that Breaking News is a super-useful app/Twitter account/idea: Day in and day out, morning and night, its editors in New York, Los Angeles, London, and Seattle push out hard news from around the globe. Breaking News’s Twitter account has around 9.5 million followers, who in the space of a couple of hours on Thursday morning received alerts about Donald Trump’s labor secretary appointment, the updated death toll in Aleppo, and a 6.8-magnitude earthquake in California. Apparently, though, “useful” wasn’t enough of a value proposition for NBC News, which owns Breaking News. Breaking News general manager Cory Bergman announced on Twitter on Thursday that it will shut the service down as of the end of the year.

RJI Futures Lab #174: Mobile News App Discors


This post is by Rachel Wise from MediaShift


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Reporting by Jon Doty. Mobile app Discors is a news aggregator that licenses content from premium, often subscription-based, news organizations. The app pairs news stories with analysis, commentary and insights.

For more information:
  • The Discors app is available on iOS and Android platforms. The newsreader and background information features are free. To access the analysis articles, users must sign up for a subscription of about $1 per month.
  • Discors has partnered with news organizations including The Washington Post, The Economist, CNN, The Guardian, Bloomberg, Foreign Policy and Tronc.
  • In July, Discors confirmed that it had raised $1.2 million from angel investors, founders and Matter Ventures, according to TechCrunch.
  • A small in-house editorial team selects articles from Discors’ partner publications and curates a feed that focuses on the top 15 to 20 stories each day. According to founder and Chief Executive Officer Basil Enan, they tend to focus on general
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RJI Futures Lab #173: Comparing Live-Streaming Apps


This post is by Rachel Wise from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Reporting by Hailey Godburn and Rachel Wise.  It’s never been so easy to just hop on a live video stream and broadcast to the world from wherever you are. So now that anyone with a smartphone can do this, the question is which tool makes the most sense to use? In this episode, we compare three different live-streaming services — Facebook Live, Kanvas for Tumblr and Periscope. We also take a look at what YouTube has in development for going live.

For more information:

Remix: 10 Great Apps for Journalism


This post is by Nicole Kraft from MediaShift


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Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

The ad was launched in 2009 to promote the iPhone. It was simple and catchy: “If you want to check snow conditions on the mountain, there’s an app for that.”
“If you want to check how many calories are in your lunch, there’s an app for that.”
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“And if you want to check exactly where you parked the car, there’s even an app for that, too.” “Yup, there’s an app for just about everything.” Seven years later, there in fact is an app for just about everything. The challenge is finding what apps are right for you and your students.
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Journalism educators strive every semester Continue reading "Remix: 10 Great Apps for Journalism"

Remix: How to Use Snapchat in the Classroom


This post is by Jon Zmikly from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

As a digital media instructor, I love using social media to engage with my students. Whether we’re using class-specific hashtags on Twitter to share relevant news items or Facebook groups as a forum for job and internship postings, social media can be an invaluable classroom supplement. Particularly useful for mass communication courses, my students have learned valuable skills and to think critically and professionally about each platform and its impact on the media industry as a whole.
But when Snapchat arrived on the scene a few years ago, I was leery. It was different from the others. Disappearing messages didn’t seem like the most effective way for storytelling, and its dark beginnings as a sexting app for teenagers made it feel less … journalistic. Profiles aren’t “public.” It’s hard
I like to provide previews and wrap-ups of course material to engage students throughout the week.
Snapchat messenger has been surprisingly useful with visual projects where I can see a student's computer screen, and we can communicate seamlessly.
During SXSW Interactive, students followed my updates and interacted with the class-related content I provided.
Continue reading "Remix: How to Use Snapchat in the Classroom"

Daily Must Reads in Media & Technology, June 9, 2016


This post is by Courtney Lowery Cowgill from MediaShift


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Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
  1. 5 Things Publishers Can Learn From How Jeff Bezos Is Running The Washington Post (Dan Kennedy / Nieman Lab)
  2. New York Times Editor Quits Twitter Over Anti-Semitic Tweets (Tom Kludt / Bloomberg)

  3. The App Boom Is Over ( Peter Kafka / Recode)

  4. Arianna Huffington Plans New Media Startup (Olivia Zaleski and Gerry Smith / Bloomberg)

  5. Selling Subscriptions Through Apple Is Getting Better For Publishers — But Also For Everyone Else (Joshua Benton / Nieman Lab)

  6. Citing A Desire To Grow, Honolulu Civil Beat Takes Down Its Paywall and Becomes A Nonprofit (Benjamin Mullin / Poynter)

Get the Daily Must Reads in Your Inbox!



The post Daily Must Reads in Media & Technology, Continue reading "Daily Must Reads in Media & Technology, June 9, 2016"

Selling subscriptions through Apple is getting better for publishers — but also for everyone else


This post is by from Nieman Lab


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Monday is Apple’s big day for software announcements at its annual WWDC conference, but we got an early peek at one of them at The Verge and Daring Fireball today — and it’s one that’ll be of interest to publishers. The Verge’s Lauren Goode:
In a rare pre-WWDC sit-down interview with the The Verge, Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing, said that Apple would soon alter its revenue-sharing model for apps. While the well-known 70/30 split will remain, developers who are able to maintain a subscription with a customer longer than a year will see Apple’s cut drop down to 15 percent. The option to sell subscriptions will also be available to all developers instead of just a few kinds of apps. “Now we’re going to open up to all categories,” Schiller says, “and that includes games, which is a huge category.”
The first part of Continue reading "Selling subscriptions through Apple is getting better for publishers — but also for everyone else"

CNN politics launches a new iOS mobile app focused on the numbers behind the 2016 campaign season


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


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CNN-politics-app-states-wonCNN Politics launched a new iOS app on Thursday dedicated to all the numbers (election results, delegate tracking) driving the 2016 election season coverage. The app offers all the things mobile news apps do now: notifications, mobile-friendly visualizations, Snapchat Discover-esque left/right swiping to move between stories and up/down swiping to dive deeper into a specific one. At the moment, the package in the app is focused on Tuesday’s Acela primary, where Donald Trump won every state and Hillary Clinton took four of five. Users can swipe down to dive into election results in each state or horizontally to view simple visual representations of the delegate race in each party. The app also contains relevant CNN Politics stories and illustrated quote cards from candidates. CNN-politics-app-CT-wonThe app was built with software company CA Technologies (at launch, there’s an ad card for the company within the app), according to a CNN release:

Continue reading "CNN politics launches a new iOS mobile app focused on the numbers behind the 2016 campaign season"