Celebrating Pride Month with WordPress.com


This post is by Anne McCarthy from The WordPress.com Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Happy Pride Month! My favorite parts about celebrating this month are the stories shared from LGBTQ+ folks, their loved ones, and organizations looking to show support. At WordPress.com, we strive to be a platform that democratizes publishing so that anyone can share their stories regardless of income, gender, politics, language, or where they live in the world. This month is a great reminder for why we work hard to expand the open web.

For me, democratizing publishing means more than just my ability to publish my own story. It’s about being able to share, but also being able to receive. As I celebrate Pride Month as a young, queer person, I think back to early online communities on which I found other LGBTQ+ people and how much I resonated with their stories. I feel lucky to be able to share my own story, but there are many LGBTQ+ folks
Continue reading "Celebrating Pride Month with WordPress.com"

Celebrating Pride Month with WordPress.com


This post is by Anne McCarthy from The WordPress.com Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Happy Pride Month! My favorite parts about celebrating this month are the stories shared from LGBTQ+ folks, their loved ones, and organizations looking to show support. At WordPress.com, we strive to be a platform that democratizes publishing so that anyone can share their stories regardless of income, gender, politics, language, or where they live in the world. This month is a great reminder for why we work hard to expand the open web.

For me, democratizing publishing means more than just my ability to publish my own story. It’s about being able to share, but also being able to receive. As I celebrate Pride Month as a young, queer person, I think back to early online communities on which I found other LGBTQ+ people and how much I resonated with their stories. I feel lucky to be able to share my own story, but there are many LGBTQ+ folks
Continue reading "Celebrating Pride Month with WordPress.com"

Electric Literature Moves to WordPress — Here’s How an Indie Publisher Thrives on the Open Web


This post is by Mark Armstrong from The WordPress.com Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Electric Literature launched 10 years ago in Brooklyn, New York, as a quarterly print journal with a mission to make literature more relevant, exciting, and inclusive. And today they’re celebrating the launch of a new website on WordPress, at electricliterature.com.
Surviving (and thriving) for ten years as an independent publisher is no small feat. Over the years the nonprofit organization has grown its online audience — with offerings like Recommended Reading and The Commuter — while expanding its membership of readers who help fund its work. The website is free to everyone and relies on the generosity of its community to donate to the site and support its mission.
How does an indie website make its business work in 2019? We talked with Electric Lit’s Executive Director Halimah Marcus about some of the lessons they’ve learned in the past 10 years.

Slow and Steady Growth Can Be a Very Continue reading "Electric Literature Moves to WordPress — Here’s How an Indie Publisher Thrives on the Open Web"

Announcing Newspack by WordPress.com — A New Publishing Solution for News Organizations


This post is by Mark Armstrong from The WordPress.com Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Over the past 15 years, WordPress has grown to become the world’s most popular publishing platform for the open web — and it’s especially true for news organizations. Through WordPress.com and our enterprise service WordPress.com VIP, we’re proud to host sites for some of the most trusted names in journalism — from Time.com and CNN to FiveThirtyEight and Quartz, as well as individual sites for reporters and bloggers all around the globe.
Today we’re excited to announce funding for a new platform, Newspack by WordPress.com, aimed at small- and medium-sized news organizations. Google, through the Google News Initiative, is taking the lead in backing the project and has committed $1.2 million. Other funders include The Lenfest Institute for Journalism, which is contributing $400,000; ConsenSys, the venture studio backing Civil Media, which is contributing $350,000; and The John S. Continue reading "Announcing Newspack by WordPress.com — A New Publishing Solution for News Organizations"

Introducing the 2019 ‘Anything Is Possible’ List


This post is by Mark Armstrong from The WordPress.com Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




A coffee co-op owned by its farmers, a sewing community empowering people of all body shapes and sizes, and a 12-year-old journalist are among those named in WordPress.com’s first-ever “Anything Is Possible” List for 2019, celebrating 14 extraordinary people and organizations who are using the web to make the world a better place. This year’s inaugural list includes nonprofits, artists who are using their work to raise awareness, and bloggers who created community when they saw a critical gap. Here are 14 inspiring sites for 2019, where Anything Is Possible:

NappStar

Congolese-American sisters Melissa and Annette Roche started NappStar, an innovative hair salon specializing in loc hairstyles, after growing up watching their mother work on people’s hair in their community in Maryland. They now operate a thriving business in New York City.

It Gets Better Project

The It Gets Better Project was launched in 2010 to help
Kelsey Montague
Maeband founder Holly Kjar and kids.
Faces of Auschwitz founder Marina Amaral
Continue reading "Introducing the 2019 ‘Anything Is Possible’ List"

What ‘Engagement Reporting’ Is and Why It Matters


This post is by Taylor Blatchford from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




What if readers, not just sources, were an active part of the news reporting process? A new group of journalists is exploring that possibility in an effort to deepen their reporting and build community relationships. “Engagement reporters” are journalists who combine the power of community engagement with traditional news reporting to do journalism that aims to authentically serve the community and reflect their interests and needs. They’re not audience engagement editors and they’re not news reporters — they live in both worlds. These roles are relatively new and still somewhat unclear, and the structure depends on the newsroom’s engagement mindset. But they add value to newsrooms by engaging with the audience throughout the reporting process and encouraging a focus on serving the community. I interviewed 12 journalists that fit this role in newsrooms across the U.S. to better understand how engagement reporters fit into newsrooms and the value they
Continue reading "What ‘Engagement Reporting’ Is and Why It Matters"

What Makes a Community?


This post is by Jeff Jarvis from BuzzMachine


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Facebook wants to build community. Ditto media. Me, too.

But I fear we are all defining and measuring community too shallowly and transiently. Community is not conversation — though that is a key metric Facebook will use to measure its success. Neither is community built on content: gathering around it, paying attention to it, linking to it, or talking about it — that is how media brands are measuring engagement. Conversation and content are tools or byproducts of real community.

Community means connecting people intimately and over time to share interests, worldviews, concerns, needs, values, empathy, and action. Facebook now says it wants to “prioritize posts that spark conversations and meaningful interactions between people.” I think that should be meaningful, lasting, and trusting interactions among people, plural. Think of community not as a cocktail party (or drunken online brawl) where friends and strangers idly chat. Instead, think of community a club

Continue reading "What Makes a Community?"

Community Writer Megan Ganz Forgives Show Creator Dan Harmon After Extensive Harassment Confession


This post is by Aidan McLaughlin from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Community writer Megan Ganz — who accused show creator Dan Harmon of sexual harassment last week — forgave her former boss after he issued an extensive apology and account of his misconduct in his podcast. Ganz, who had a back and forth with an apologetic Harmon on Twitter after first launching the accusations, directed her followers on Wednesday night to listen to the latest episode of Harmon’s podcast: At around the 18:30 mark of the podcast, Harmon goes into a thorough mea culpa over his behavior on the set of hit show Community, describing his attempts to flirt with Ganz — despite her expressed disinterest and his “live-in girlfriend. Continue reading "Community Writer Megan Ganz Forgives Show Creator Dan Harmon After Extensive Harassment Confession"

From the unbanked to the unnewsed: Just doing good journalism won’t be enough to bring back reader trust


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Does any of that sound familiar to those of us in the media? The decline of print newspapers has replaced a set of trusted local businesses with distant giants in places like New York and D.C. The power of personal relationships means the quality of the friend sharing the news story on Facebook can seem more important than the quality of the news outlet producing it. The price of reading a print daily newspaper has soared as customer bases have shifted upmarket; most news sites are still free, but an increasing share of the best have put up paywalls. Swapping mass for niche media means there are plenty of top-notch news outlets targeting well-off, highly educated people, or demographically appealing young people — but fewer targeting everybody else. And as people feel increasingly disengaged from traditional institutions, the incentives to invest time in consuming high-quality news shrink. If you Continue reading "From the unbanked to the unnewsed: Just doing good journalism won’t be enough to bring back reader trust"

Jay Rosen: This is what a news organization built on reader trust looks like


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




At the kind of journalism conferences that I attend, Aron Pilhofer, who had key roles in the digital operations of The New York Times and The Guardian in recent years, has been asking a very good question: What if news organizations optimized every part of the operation for trust? Not for speed, traffic, profits, headlines or prizes… but for trust. What would that even look like? My answer: It would look a lot like De Correspondent. Launched in 2013 in The Netherlands, De Correspondent is funded solely by its members: 56,000 of them, who pay about $63 a year because they believe in the kind of journalism that is done by its 21 full-time correspondents and 75 freelancers. The leaders of the site announced today that they will soon expand to the U.S. and set up shop in New York. (See Ken Doctor’s post on Nieman Lab for
Continue reading "Jay Rosen: This is what a news organization built on reader trust looks like"

8 Takeaways from Moving Journalism from the Classroom to the Community


This post is by Sue Robinson from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The student looked vexed as she lingered outside my office door. “Come on in,” I said, smiling at her with what I hoped was my most welcoming you-can-talk-to-me-I-promise-not-to-judge expression. It was the middle of the semester and the young woman was in my new Journalism For Racial Justice: Amplifying Marginalized Voices in Local Community class that ran in Spring 2016 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I knew things were getting real for the students. After pleasantries, she launched into it: “I find myself nervous because it is so different from how I’ve been taught up until now. I don’t really know how to overcome the way I usually think about stories.” Though from an expression of distress, her words filled me with a sense of gratification. They meant I was changing how students were thinking about journalism. That was exactly what I had set out to do. But I didn’t
UW-Madison senior Brianna Johnson edits audio with a student at the Lussier Community Education Center's radio show.
Prof. Sue Robinson talks to her new service-learning class about reconceptualizing "sources" in community journalism.
Continue reading "8 Takeaways from Moving Journalism from the Classroom to the Community"

How to Boost Instagram Video Views with Influencers, Community


This post is by Gabrielle Boland from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This guest post was originally published on the NewsWhip blog. With video growing more prevalent on every platform, here are the must-know content trends for successful Instagram video.
Instagram has been making big moves this summer. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery they say, and Instagram has adopted several of visual platform Snapchat’s features, including Instagram Stories to match Snapchat Stories.
ADVERTISEMENT
Last month, we looked at four quick things to know about successful Instagram videos. In the six months leading up to April 2016, the time users spent watching video on Instagram increased by over 40 percent. With Instagram Stories featuring prominently at the top of the feed, this number will likely grow.

Top Video News Publishers

We looked at the top news publishers on Instagram in June and July to see how publishers were engaging their followers
newswhip-instagram-3
newswhip-instagram-2
?
?
?
?
?
Continue reading "How to Boost Instagram Video Views with Influencers, Community"

Covering the Big Story: How the Financial Times Handled the Brexit Vote


This post is by Sarah Laitner from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This post is co-authored by Robin Kwong. Journalists live for the big story. The UK’s vote to leave the European Union was by far the largest event in recent times for the Financial Times, an international news organization with a British base. FT.com, our website, had record levels of traffic on the day of the result, with the audience reading three times as many stories as usual. We also had our highest ever referrals from social media. Planning for a story of such importance and with so many news lines presented challenges. Big set-piece events such as this one are a rarity, and we didn’t have an established playbook to draw from. Here are six lessons we learned:

Be useful to your audience

It pays to think about how to address specific challenges your audience might face. For example, we knew there would be many opinion polls ahead of voting day on
Members of the "strongerin" campaign talk to voters in Exmouth market this afternoon, trying to persuade people to vote remain in the upcoming EU referendum. Photo by Charlie Bibby. 20/6/2016
Members of the Leave campaign sail to Westminster ahead of the UK's EU referendum. Photo by Charlie Bibby 15/6/2017
Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 07.50.26
Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 07.52.11
Continue reading "Covering the Big Story: How the Financial Times Handled the Brexit Vote"

Pope: Christians Must Seek Forgiveness for Mistreating the Gay Community


This post is by Robert Webster from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




shutterstock_441802504Pope Francis made a landmark statement while flying back to Rome from a visit to Armenia. He suggested that Christians should apologize to the gay community for mistreating them and seek forgiveness for treating them in such a way. The comment was made in reference to a question asking if the Pope agreed with comments made by German Cardinal Reinhard Marx saying that the Catholic Church needed to apologize for the way it has treated gays and lesbians in the past. These comments were made in the wake of the Orlando mass shooting at a gay nightclub, which The Holy Father had earlier condemned as “homicidal folly and senseless hatred.” “We Christians have to apologise for so many things, not just for this (treatment of gay people), but we must ask for forgiveness. Not just apologise — forgiveness,” the Pope said, according to News24. “The question is,” he continued, Continue reading "Pope: Christians Must Seek Forgiveness for Mistreating the Gay Community"

Alabama Rep Says Muslims in US Would ‘Kill Every Homosexual’ If They Could


This post is by Robert Webster from Mediaite


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Screen Shot 2016-06-16 at 12.42.52 PMOn Thursday, Congressman Mo Brooks (R. Ala) said he believes that the Democrats have a major problem on their hands, and it has to do with two key groups they’re trying to attract. Efforts to earn the support of the LGBT community and the Muslim community are inherently at odds with one another, according to Congressman Brooks, because the Muslim community “…would kill every homosexual in the United States of America”. His assertion came in a response to a question about why the Democratic party has fallen short of recognizing many of more controversial elements of “mainstream Muslim thought.” Brooks said:
“Well, it’s probably because they’re counting votes. And they’re seeking a block vote from the Muslim community in the United States and that’s a community that’s increasing in political power, as it’s doing in Europe. More and more votes are there. And the Democrats are in a perplexing position. On Continue reading "Alabama Rep Says Muslims in US Would ‘Kill Every Homosexual’ If They Could"

Remix: How to Really Teach Students to Engage Communities


This post is by Rebecca Blatt from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Remix is a segment of education content on MediaShift, featuring interesting and innovative journalism assignments, courses and curricula. Writers will detail their ideas and work and, where possible, provide links and materials, so other educators can adapt them in their own programs. If you’re interested in sharing your approaches to be remixed at other schools, contact education curator Katy Culver.

When we launched the Cronkite Public Insight Network Bureau in 2014, we planned for students on Arizona State University’s downtown Phoenix campus to work with journalists across the country on digital engagement projects. In particular, students at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication would learn to use American Public Media’s PIN engagement platform, and they would collaborate with journalists who wanted to gather personal stories and expertise from members of their own communities. In our first year, PIN Bureau students worked with journalists in more than two
Cronkite School alumna Margaret Staniforth interviewed women motorcyclists for her community project. Photo by PIN Bureau staff.
Cronkite School alumnus Chris Caraveo focused his community project on Hispanic engineers. (Photo by Cronkite PIN Bureau staff)
Cronkite School alumna Lindsay Robinson produced a digital art tour of downtown Phoenix. (Photo by Cronkite PIN Bureau staff)
Continue reading "Remix: How to Really Teach Students to Engage Communities"

How Crowdfunding Is Empowering Communities to Tell Own Their Stories


This post is by Angilee Shah from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I’ve been running a crowdfunding campaign with my colleagues here at Public Radio International for one month. What I’ve learned: It’s about so much more than money.

We crafted the Global Nation Reporting Fund as a challenge to ourselves: Could we get one new contributor onto PRI.org — and thus give them a step into public media — every week for a year? Could we get more people who are immersed in the communities and topics we want to cover to become the authors of the stories we tell? And could we do it in a way where this community, largely immigrants and children of immigrants themselves, are the funders as well?

From the beginning, this was a project led by a group of people who are interested in conversations about immigration that connect different ethnic groups and people with varied experiences. The rewards for our Kickstarter campaign come

Koshy told us why she backed the Global Nation Reporting Fund.  (Image by Angilee Shah)
Continue reading "How Crowdfunding Is Empowering Communities to Tell Own Their Stories"

The Math Behind the Metrics


This post is by Francis Tseng from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As part of the Coral Project, we’re trying to come up with some interesting and useful metrics about community members and discussion on news sites for our first product. It’s an interesting exercise to develop metrics which embody an organization’s principles. For instance – perhaps we see our content as the catalyst for conversations, so we’d measure an article’s success by how much discussion it generates. Generally, there are two groups of metrics that I have been focusing on:
  • Asset-level metrics, computed for individual articles or whatever else may be commented on
  • User-level metrics, computed for individual users
For the past couple of weeks I’ve been sketching out a few ideas for these metrics:
  • For assets, the principles that these metrics aspire to capture are around quantity and diversity of discussion.
  • For users, I look at organizational approval, community approval, how much discussion this user tends to generate, and
    coral-discussion-score-equation
    francis-tseng-150x150
    tara-adiseshan-150x150
    The Coral Project creates open-source software to facilitate the importing, storage, moderation, and display of contributions to news websites.
    Continue reading "The Math Behind the Metrics"

Daily Must Reads, Oct. 21, 2015


This post is by Courtney Lowery Cowgill from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




  1. Why Yahoo Wrote Down $42 million for ‘Community’ (Erin Griffith / Fortune)

  2. ESPN to Lay Off About 300 Employees (Shalini Ramachandran / Wall Street Journal)

  3. Vice Blacks Out All Its Homepages and Social Media to Call for the Release of Journalist Mohammed Rasool (Laura Hazard Owen / Nieman Lab)

  4. Gawker Names John Cook Executive Editor (Peter Sterne / Politico)

  5. Slightly Fewer Americans Are Reading Print Books, New Survey Finds (Lee Rainie and Andrew Perrin / Pew Research Center)

  6. When News Organizations Publish Stuff Accidentally (Erik Wemple / Washington Post)

Our Must Reads come our every Monday through Friday.

Have them delivered straight to your email inbox by subscribing on this page.

Newsonomics: At the Times, the need for a private owner is L.A. consequential


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It’s a trademark line of Austin Beutner’s: “I cannot imagine Los Angeles without a vibrant L.A. Times.” As anyone who follows media knows, the Los Angeles Times publisher’s imagination short-circuited the day after Labor Day, when he was fired by Tribune Publishing CEO Jack Griffin (“Tribune to fire L.A. Times publisher Austin Beutner”). Unfortunately, too many citizens and readers can imagine that day. Today, the Times can only claim a household reach of 7.4 percent in the L.A. designated market area. That’s right: Only one of 14 households take the paper. Yes, the Times’ digital reach is much greater, but that print reach number tells the story of civic decline. It’s the place of the Times in greater L.A. — the digital, print, and in-person Times — that should drive the Tribune/Times story forward. Don’t be distracted by the sometimes-cartoonish depictions of
southern-california-map-cc
Los Angeles Times
mark-zuckerberg-f8-facebook-ap
local-news-newspaper-wind-ap
half-newspapers
the-gates-impermanent-cc
love-money
Continue reading "Newsonomics: At the Times, the need for a private owner is L.A. consequential"