How to successfully pitch The New York Times (or, well, anyone else)


This post is by Tim Herrera from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Freelancing is tough! It can be an unpredictable, unreliable grind, and sometimes things fall through even if you’ve done everything right. As Smarter Living editor at The New York Times, the bulk of my job is working with freelancers. On the slowest days, I’ll get around a dozen cold pitches in my inbox; on busy days, almost 200. (Lol sorry if I owe you an email, promise I’m working on it.) The thousands of pitches I’ve read over the last few years usually fall into one of three categories: great (very few), something we can work with (a small, but decent, amount) and bad (everything else). Before we go on, it’s worth remembering: A bad pitch is not the same thing as a bad story idea. Pitches get turned down for countless reasons — you pitched the wrong outlet, the wrong editor, your idea wasn’t fully fleshed out, the Continue reading "How to successfully pitch The New York Times (or, well, anyone else)"

Journalism Rip Off: Is it ‘Following Up,’ Lifting or Straight Up Plagiarism?


This post is by Ginger Gorman from MediaShift


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Two weeks before publication of my four-month long investigation into Internet trolling by Fairfax newspapers across Australia, my editor sent me an email. “It’s been playing on my mind. I would hate this to have any repercussions on you,” she wrote, “I’m letting you know that you can pull out…if you fear for your safety.” “I don’t want to pull out. I know and accept the risk,” I wrote back, “People are coming to harm and no one seems to care. I feel a moral obligation to publish. It’s idealistic and maybe foolhardy. But that’s my view.” And so, on Sunday June 17 the trolling project’s flagship story hit the front page of Melbourne’s Age newspaper and Sydney’s Sun-Herald. It was also published online alongside a compelling video – something that was equal parts exciting and terrifying. Terrifying because my main interview subject, Mark (not his real name), Continue reading "Journalism Rip Off: Is it ‘Following Up,’ Lifting or Straight Up Plagiarism?"

Jeff Israely: What comes next in the Uberization of the news business?


This post is by from Nieman Lab


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When we launched Worldcrunch in 2011, Uber the company was popping up in my Twitter feed, but I hadn’t yet figured out what the concept was. Back then, for those of us looking for new ways to cover the world, there were two widely touted innovations that were going to change everything: content farms and crowdsourcing. You remember? The former was the bottom-feeding mass production of SEO-scamming how-to articles and clickbait posts by poorly paid contract writers; the latter was a supposedly more noble formula whereby readers themselves would provide some of the free labor that might eventually make professional reporters and editors obsolete. The content farms would soon be undermined by Google wising up to the ruse and altering its search algorithms. The vision of the crowd supplanting the pros, meanwhile, was bound to fall far short, even if it proved to be on the vanguard of a broader Continue reading "Jeff Israely: What comes next in the Uberization of the news business?"

“But it’s…cartoons?”: Comics and cartoons are coming to life well beyond the printed page


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When Kevin Necessary read a story from WCPO — a Scripps-owned television station in Cincinnati with a robust website — that shared intimate details about undocumented immigrant families living in the great Cincinnati area, he recognized something about the photos. “Lucy May [the reporter] couldn’t include any kind of art other than pictures of apartments, or the back of someone’s heads or their shoulders. Nothing that would identify them,” Necessary recalled. “That really got me thinking — when we did another story of a similarly sensitive nature, could we do it as a graphic novel? Lucy had a similar idea.
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Continue reading "“But it’s…cartoons?”: Comics and cartoons are coming to life well beyond the printed page"

Survey: Freelancers Happy, Hopeful, but Undercompensated Considering Education Level


This post is by Dillon Baker from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This post originally appeared on Contently’s The Freelancer. There are a lot of studies out there about freelancing—but not many about freelance creatives. Here at The Freelancer, that’s who we are: writers, editors, photographers, designers, and more, all pursuing our passions while trying to make a buck. So we decided to create a recurring study about, and for, those freelance creatives. Last year’s inaugural edition covered a variety of topics, including workflow, unions, and the best and worst parts about freelancing. This year, we ran many of the same questions in order to gauge any change in the community. But we also introduced a swath of new topics such as the pervasiveness of branded content, a more detailed demographic breakdown of income, and the importance of social media and technology. Here are the results.

Methodology

We sent out a 42 question survey through Typeform this April to our email list and
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Glenn Greenwald Talks Freelancing, Future of Investigative Journalism


This post is by Dillon Baker from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It’s fair to say that the Edward Snowden leaks, which revealed top-secret and wide-ranging surveillance programs run by government agencies such as the NSA and the GCHQ, has been the biggest journalistic scoop of the decade. What people may not know is that the now-famous journalist who scooped the story, Glenn Greenwald, was a freelancer. Though he had been writing regularly for the Guardian, Greenwald had insisted on his independent status, just as he had in his previous gig with Salon. In fact, Greenwald had always been an independent journalist: His first foray into the field was his blog, Unclaimed Territory, which he began in 2005 after 10 years of practicing law. Now, Greenwald has finally settled down. In 2014, he became one of the founding editors at The Intercept, a publication dedicated exclusively to adversarial investigative journalism. Funded by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, The Intercept is just one of many
Photo by Gage Skidmore on Flickr and reused here with Creative Commons license.
Image by Foxcroft Academy on Flickr and reused here with Creative Commons license.
Screenshot courtesy of BuzzFeed.com.
The story "Angels of Death," which was commissioned by the Contently Foundation, won an award for investigative reporting. Screenshot courtesy of Contently.
Photo by jessamyn west on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.
Continue reading "Glenn Greenwald Talks Freelancing, Future of Investigative Journalism"

The 9 Most Important Takeaways From Freelancers Union’s Annual Survey


This post is by Kristen Fischer from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Whether you moonlight or work as an independent contractor, freelancing isn’t easy. But if you’re like the thousands of freelancers who responded to the “Freelancing in America” survey, you enjoy the freelance lifestyle, despite its many challenges. The survey, conducted by Edelman Berland and commissioned by freelance platform Upwork (formerly Elance-oDesk) and Freelancers Union, offers insights on the state of freelancing in 2015 from a pool of 7,107 people who have completed paid freelance work in the last year. It defines freelancers as those engaged in supplemental, temporary, or project- and contract-based work, and breaks freelancers down into more granular categories: independent contractors, moonlighters, diversified workers (people who are both “traditional employers and freelance workers,” like someone working a part-time desk job while writing on their off-time), temporary workers and freelance business owners. For your reading pleasure, we broke down the report into the nine most important takeways for
Continue reading "The 9 Most Important Takeaways From Freelancers Union’s Annual Survey"

Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Nov. 10 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift will list upcoming online trainings and courses for journalists and media people — with a focus on digital training. We’ll include our new DigitalEd courses, as well as those from Mediabistro, NewsU, KDMC, and others. If we’re missing anything, please let us know at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org.

FEATURED TRAINING

DigitalEd: How to Get Foundation Funding
Have you ever considered getting foundation grants to help support your journalism and media projects? Didn’t know where to start? This training will give an overview of the major foundations and what they typically fund. There’s also a chance for one-on-one feedback from the instructor. Major media foundations are going through upheaval, with major reorganizations happening at Knight Foundation, McCormick Foundation, Ford Foundation, MacArthur Foundation and others. There will be a discussion of these changes, and how they will affect your chances for grants. And now foundations are supporting Continue reading "Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Nov. 10 Edition"

Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Nov. 3 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift will list upcoming online trainings and courses for journalists and media people — with a focus on digital training. We’ll include our new DigitalEd courses, as well as those from Mediabistro, NewsU, KDMC, and others. If we’re missing anything, please let us know at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org.

FEATURED TRAINING

DigitalEd: 5 Tech Tools to Improve Your Reporting
We’ll introduce you to tech tools and platforms that will help you obtain and manipulate data. You’ll learn how to scrape social accounts, without knowing any code. And you’ll discover how to use features that are built into services you already use in more powerful ways. Plus, we’ll look at some popular (free!) project management software and applications to help you collaborate with colleagues and manage reporting projects.
Date and time: Nov. 9, 2015, 10am PT
Producer: DigitalEd at MediaShift
Place: online
Price: $39
 

NOVEMBER 2015

Producing Continue reading "Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Nov. 3 Edition"

Can WordRates, PitchLab Flip the Script for Freelancers vs. Publishers?


This post is by Yael Grauer from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Award-winning investigative journalist, author and anthropologist Scott Carney thinks that writers are getting paid too little. Way too little. His solution? To make publications compete against one another — and after raising $9,307 from 246 backers (full disclosure: I was one of them) through Kickstarter in May, he’s now launched a two-tiered project to do just that. WordRates, the first tier of the project, will provide a Yelp-esque database of user-submitted ratings of editors, publications and boilerplate contracts, along with contact information for editors. The second part of the project, PitchLab, is modeled after the book publishing industry. It will employ mentors to workshop pitches with journalists and help shop them around to multiple publications in order to get the best rate and contract. For freelancers frustrated with stagnant rates and the lack of transparency in the publishing industry, WordRates and PitchLabs are exciting opportunities to level the playing field (which we previously 
Image by Wikimedia and used here with Creative Commons license.
Screenshot courtesy of Wordrates.com
Screenshot courtesy of Wordrates.com
Continue reading "Can WordRates, PitchLab Flip the Script for Freelancers vs. Publishers?"

Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 27 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift will list upcoming online trainings and courses for journalists and media people — with a focus on digital training. We’ll include our new DigitalEd courses, as well as those from Mediabistro, NewsU, KDMC, and others. If we’re missing anything, please let us know at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org.

FEATURED TRAINING

DigitalEd: How to Create Digital Maps
This training will introduce participants to three free tools for digital map-making. Following a discussion on geographic data sourcing, organization, and visualization, this training will conclude with instructions on how participants can visualize a simple dataset using one of three tools. Participants will leave understanding the data and story underlying digital maps as well as an appreciation of how to design maps and how they can be used effectively.
Date and time: Oct. 28, 2015, 10am PT
Producer: DigitalEd at MediaShift
Place: online
Price: $39

OCTOBER 2015

Tools for Smart Continue reading "Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 27 Edition"

Daily Must Reads, Oct. 22, 2015


This post is by Courtney Lowery Cowgill from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




  1. An Inside Look at YouTube’s New Ad-Free Subscription Service (Ben Popper / The Verge)

  2. PolitiFact and Scripps launch partnerships in Arizona, Nevada, Colorado and Ohio (Aaron Sharockman / Tampa Bay Times)

  3. WordRates: A Yelp-Like Site for Freelance Writers (Dianna Dilworth / Galley Cat)

  4. Mark Luckie on Keeping Up With Black Twitter and Covering It (Marissa Evans / Poynter)

  5. Google Has Launched Its €150m Fund for European Publishers (Mark Sweney / The Guardian)

  6. In Six Months, Quartz Videos Rack Up 45 Million Views on Platforms (Lucia Moses / Digiday)

Our Must Reads come our every Monday through Friday.

Have them delivered straight to your email inbox by subscribing on this page.

Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 20 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift will list upcoming online trainings and courses for journalists and media people — with a focus on digital training. We’ll include our new DigitalEd courses, as well as those from Mediabistro, NewsU, KDMC, and others. If we’re missing anything, please let us know at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org.

FEATURED TRAINING

How to Start a Podcast
Podcasts are having more than a moment — they’re in the middle of a revolution. According to recent research, consumption of podcasts grew 25 percent from 2013 to 2014, and that number continues to grow. But there’s still plenty of opportunity to jump on board this emerging medium to increase your authority, develop new skills, reach your audience in a new way … and even develop a brand-new audience that might otherwise never have found you. In this session we’ll cover the basics of getting your podcast off the ground. Continue reading "Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 20 Edition"

Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 13 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift will list upcoming online trainings and courses for journalists and media people — with a focus on digital training. We’ll include our new DigitalEd courses, as well as those from Mediabistro, NewsU, KDMC, and others. If we’re missing anything, please let us know at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org.

FEATURED TRAINING

How to Start a Podcast
Podcasts are having more than a moment — they’re in the middle of a revolution. According to recent research, consumption of podcasts grew 25 percent from 2013 to 2014, and that number continues to grow. But there’s still plenty of opportunity to jump on board this emerging medium to increase your authority, develop new skills, reach your audience in a new way … and even develop a brand-new audience that might otherwise never have found you. In this session we’ll cover the basics of getting your podcast off the ground. Continue reading "Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 13 Edition"

Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 6 Edition


This post is by Sonia Paul from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, MediaShift will list upcoming online trainings and courses for journalists and media people — with a focus on digital training. We’ll include our new DigitalEd courses, as well as those from Mediabistro, NewsU, KDMC, and others. If we’re missing anything, please let us know at mark [at] mediashift [dot] org.

FEATURED TRAINING

Smartphone Filmmaking 101
Whether you’re shooting coverage for your high-concept documentary, making a low-budget music video for your band, or shooting pick-ups for your corporate online PSA, there are a multitude ways to use your phone as a legitimate route for production. This training will illustrate the use of the iPhone as a low-budget professional production camera. We’ll include short practical tips on shooting techniques. We’ll review and demonstrate some of the emerging technology, apps and software alongside of traditional tips and tricks that can be added to a smartphone in order to make it Continue reading "Upcoming Trainings and Courses: Oct. 6 Edition"

Pitching coach: A program at the University of Toronto wants to turn subject experts into freelancers


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




“Atul Gawande is a model of a guy who is active in his field, but in his journalism he’s actually a reporter,” Robert Steiner said. “He’s not just opining and writing op-ed pieces.” It’s the hope of creating more Gawandes that brought a diverse group of professionals — several doctors, lawyers, an art curator, and the director of a human-rights education NGO — to Toronto this month to start an eight-month-long program at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs to be trained as reporters. The school’s Fellowship in Global Journalism was developed in response to cutbacks in traditional outlets that have often shrunk the numbers of beat reporters who are truly specialists in their area of coverage. “We’re running this like a clinical program; it’s
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Pitching coach: A program at the University of Toronto wants to turn subject experts into freelancers


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




“Atul Gawande is a model of a guy who is active in his field, but in his journalism he’s actually a reporter,” Robert Steiner said. “He’s not just opining and writing op-ed pieces.” It’s the hope of creating more Gawandes that brought a diverse group of professionals — several doctors, lawyers, an art curator, and the director of a human-rights education NGO — to Toronto this month to start an eight-month-long program at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs to be trained as reporters. The school’s Fellowship in Global Journalism was developed in response to cutbacks in traditional outlets that have often shrunk the numbers of beat reporters who are truly specialists in their area of coverage. “We’re running this like a clinical program; it’s more like a medical residency than a j-school,” said Steiner, the fellowship’s director and a former Wall Street Journal correspondent. “Our Continue reading "Pitching coach: A program at the University of Toronto wants to turn subject experts into freelancers"

No Unions, No Problem: How Freelancers Are Fighting for Their Rights


This post is by Dillon Baker from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




“Brooklyn is like a goldmine. We can find so many people. Writers are actually very affordable in New York, which is very nice.” That’s Sean Beckner, CEO of media company Viral Nova, in a New York Magazine piece about his wildly successful (and recently purchased) content farm. He’s responding to a question about how Viral Nova finds and pays writers — the company was worried it wouldn’t be able to properly staff the editorial team — but was “happily surprised at how little New York writers will work for.” It’s a callous answer, but Beckner is right. Writers, in Brooklyn and elsewhere, often work for a pittance or, in the case of writing for big media brands, exposure. As the Internet has lowered the bar to entry for professional writing, and media companies feel the squeeze of shrunken profits, rates have hollowed out for all but the elite
Photo by niclas and used here with Creative Commons license.
Photo by jessamyn west on Flickr and used here with Creative Commons license.
Photo by Melanie Holtsman and used here with Creative Commons license.
Photo by Berto via Flickr and used with Creative Commons license.
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Should Writers Respond to Comments on Their Articles?


This post is by Yael Grauer from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When I first started writing, everyone always warned me to stay far, far away from the comments. Perhaps I’m narcissistic — or a glutton for punishment — but I found it nearly impossible to stop myself from checking in. When writing for MMA sites, I’d read through insult after insult written by teenagers living in their parents’ basement (our core audience), which was never a pleasant experience. The free weekly paper that paid me pennies to blog about food after it fired its full-time food writer clearly didn’t have the staff to moderate comments. Whenever I’d give a restaurant a good review, I’d get to sift through weird conspiracy theories about how I was secretly coerced into saying nice things because of some kind of advertising deal that didn’t actually exist. I always felt slightly betrayed that these sites hung us writers out to dry by not moderating at all.
Photo by Jeroen Bennink and reused here with Creative Commons license.
MediaShift stock photo.
MediaShift stock photo
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How J-School Did and Did Not Prepare Me to Report Abroad


This post is by Meagan Doll from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Every time I have traveled and no matter how hard or long I’ve prepared, I am always humbly reminded that one can never get fully ready for an experience abroad. I was slapped with this reality yet again when I arrived in Mukono, Uganda, to spend six weeks reporting on maternal health and associated issues. Partnering with Save the Mothers, an international NGO committed to improving the health of mothers and babies, I hoped this brief residency would give me a peek into the “real world” of foreign correspondence and human rights journalism – the one beyond wanderlust travel, paid exploration and glamorous Nicholas Kristof-esque bylines. And it did just that. At different times and somehow all at once, my time reporting was challenging, exciting, frightening, exhilarating, disheartening, inspiring and always rewarding.
Reporting from the field in Uganda illustrated the power of critical and ethical thinking. Photo by Meagan Doll.

Reporting from the field in Uganda illustrated the power of critical thinking and ethical consideration. Photo by Meagan

I had the opportunity to interview Rwandese women entrepreneurs with a translator. Photo by Meagan Doll.
Continue reading "How J-School Did and Did Not Prepare Me to Report Abroad"