Five questions for… Keri Gilder, Chief Commercial Officer, Colt Technology Services. Can Connectivity be linked to Customer Experience?


This post is by Jon Collins from Gigaom


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Customer experience, or CX, is one of those areas that makes you wonder why it’s being discussed: after all, which organisation would go out of it way to say that customers were not a priority? Nonetheless, talking about customers can be very different to actually improving how they interact with the business, not least because the link between theory and technical practicality will not always be evident. In the case of connectivity, the task is even harder. In principle there should be a connection – if you (as a customer) can’t connect to the service you need, or if it is slow or unresponsive, your experience will be less good. In practice however, connectivity is often seen as low-level infrastructure, with little value to add beyond linking things up. These challenges made our research on the link between connectivity and CX, conducted in partnership with Colt, all the more fascinating. Continue reading "Five questions for… Keri Gilder, Chief Commercial Officer, Colt Technology Services. Can Connectivity be linked to Customer Experience?"

Newsonomics: Tribune’s Thursday night surprise rescrambles the consolidation puzzle


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In a Thursday evening surprise, Tribune Publishing chairman and CEO Justin Dearborn is out, along with two company executives. Out, here, is a relative term as Dearborn’s three-year tenure, his first ever in the newspaper industry, could net him a payout of $8 million or more, while the other two could take in millions. Tim Knight, currently president of Tribune, will immediately succeed Dearborn as CEO. Could the moves presage the major rollup that’s been increasingly talked about in America’s now-in-play, ever-struggling daily newspaper industry? Does the move tell us anything about the likelihood of Alden Global Capital successfully winning Gannett? What will Tribune, Gannett, Digital First Media, and McClatchy — four of the major U.S. daily chains, all involved in this possible buying, selling, and mating — look like when the newsprint M&A dust settles? The suddenness of Dearborn’s removal suggests that bigger moves are imminent. One Continue reading "Newsonomics: Tribune’s Thursday night surprise rescrambles the consolidation puzzle"

Newsonomics: Let the 2019 Consolidation Games begin! First up: Alden seeks to swallow Gannett


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Alden Global Capital, the most reviled newspaper owner in the business, now wants to buy Gannett, the United States’ largest daily newspaper company. As reported Sunday evening by The Wall Street Journal — and then confirmed via early Monday morning press release — Alden, through its Digital First Media/MNG Enterprise ownership, has offered a 23 percent premium for Gannett. Alden apparently told reporters it had been in recent contact with Gannett about the offer. But later on Sunday night, Gannett’s USA Today told a different tale, with a company source saying “there has been no communication regarding a proposal to the company.” But this morning, an updated version of the story acknowledged Gannett had “officially received an unsolicited proposal to acquire the company.” This may be the first newspaper mergers-and-acquisitions story of 2019, but it definitely won’t be the last. Consolidation (and the cost-cutting that comes with Continue reading "Newsonomics: Let the 2019 Consolidation Games begin! First up: Alden seeks to swallow Gannett"

Newsonomics: 18 lessons for the news business from 2018


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We live in transgressive, new-Orwellian times. Fact has been subverted by forces beyond our imagination, both newly minted and old school. Truth, elusive truth, is now in the mind of the subscriber. Yes, it is subscribers, along with their digital payments, who are transforming what’s working best among news-originating companies today and laying the groundwork for the early 2020s. With 2019 nearly upon us, we can look at the year past and see a tired decade dragging to a close, with few winners, numerous strugglers, and caravans of losers. Facebook has fallen flatter on its face, The Social Network is in danger of becoming a social disease. Google maintains its primacy, even as its CEO is called to Capitol Hill to explain how the current president’s name somehow appears when “idiot” is typed into its engine. Greed isn’t just good in the minds of many — it’s the long-term strategy Continue reading "Newsonomics: 18 lessons for the news business from 2018"

Newsonomics: 18 lessons for the news business from 2018


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We live in transgressive, new-Orwellian times. Fact has been subverted by forces beyond our imagination, both newly minted and old school. Truth, elusive truth, is now in the mind of the subscriber. Yes, it is subscribers, along with their digital payments, who are transforming what’s working best among news-originating companies today and laying the groundwork for the early 2020s. With 2019 nearly upon us, we can look at the year past and see a tired decade dragging to a close, with few winners, numerous strugglers, and caravans of losers. Facebook has fallen flatter on its face, The Social Network is in danger of becoming a social disease. Google maintains its primacy, even as its CEO is called to Capitol Hill to explain how the current president’s name somehow appears when “idiot” is typed into its engine. Greed isn’t just good in the minds of many — it’s the long-term strategy Continue reading "Newsonomics: 18 lessons for the news business from 2018"

Now Available in the Mobile Apps: Revision History


This post is by Tyler from The WordPress.com Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The ability to load a previous version of a page or post is invaluable when you need to make a quick correction or compare your current revision to earlier ones. What about viewing your content’s revision history on the go? This can be a real life-saver, as we’re not always at our desktops. Well, we’re thrilled to announce that you can now review your content’s history and load revisions for both pages and posts directly from the WordPress mobile apps.

View History

The revision history of every page or post you’ve worked on is available right from the editor. Just tap My SitesSite Pages or Blog Posts → any page or post → three-dots button → History.
View History
The history list shows you the time each revision was created (organized by date), the author of the revision, as well as the number of additions and deletions for each revision.
Load Revision
Continue reading "Now Available in the Mobile Apps: Revision History"

Newsonomics: The Washington Post’s ambitions for Arc have grown — to a Bezosian scale


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In the blink of a digital era, The Washington Post’s Arc publishing platform has sprinted from an experiment to a full-on strategic business. Arc is now used by more than 30 clients operating more than 100 sites on four continents. It’s not the industry standard, but it’s not too early to call it an industry standard. But its ambitions are still nowhere near met. Now the Post is moving Arc into a new phase, talking of a connective effect that could impact the face of the business formerly known as “newspapering.” Arc wants to be more than a technology stack — it wants to be a network. “Arc is reaching a critical mass of most of the advertising markets in the United States, the major markets,” Shailesh Prakash, chief product and information officer for the Post, told me recently, listing off cities where it has customers — New
Continue reading "Newsonomics: The Washington Post’s ambitions for Arc have grown — to a Bezosian scale"

12 prototypes, eight weeks, and lots of tapping: What’s worked (and hasn’t) in the BBC’s quest for new storytelling formats


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Pardon the irony of reading a more-than-800-word article about finding better story formats than 800-word articles. You see, while this might be a somewhat effective way for us to communicate with you, lovely Nieman Lab readers, it isn’t the most effective for the breadth of the BBC’s audience. Though journalists might be trained to write in chunks like this, some readers — especially young’ins — need information that comes in a more deliberate format. As Tristan Ferne, the lead producer for the BBC’s research and development unit, put it in a recent 2,043-word post, “Could we combine existing media to make online news more accessible, engaging and relevant to young people?” (This was just one phase of the team’s year-long quest to test new formats for storytelling; other stages involved ways to help readers comprehend news better, and new methods of personalizing information.) Some options
Continue reading "12 prototypes, eight weeks, and lots of tapping: What’s worked (and hasn’t) in the BBC’s quest for new storytelling formats"

Newsonomics: Newsprint tariffs are a Black Swan event that could speed up the death of U.S. newspapers


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




People have been forecasting the “death of newspapers” for more than a decade now. They see a kettle of vultures amid the ever-darkening clouds of print advertising collapse, slowed digital advertising, and the difficulty of signing up new digital subscribers. Now the battle is heating up on Capitol Hill over tariffs that the Trump administration imposed on Canadian groundwood paper earlier this year. The tariffs increase the cost of newsprint by as much as 30 to 35 percent, though the impact on publishers is highly uneven, with some chains in better shape and the dwindling independents most at risk. The predictable impacts already in motion: more newsroom layoffs, thinner (and reshaped) print products, fewer Sunday preprints, and an overall further diminishing of the value proposition newspapers are offering their readers. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette will reduce its printing days from seven to five next month. The Nevada Appeal in Carson City, Continue reading "Newsonomics: Newsprint tariffs are a Black Swan event that could speed up the death of U.S. newspapers"

The number of Americans who get news from mobile has nearly tripled since 2013


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The use of mobile phones for news now far outpaces the use of desktops and laptops for news — and that’s a big change over just the past two years, according to a factsheet released by the Pew Research Center on Tuesday. The above chart refers to Americans who “often” get news from mobile or desktop/laptop, but 96 percent of Americans ever get news “online” (i.e. from a mobile device or computer). Pew also offers up some other, not-super-surprising stats about who’s most likely to get news from mobile: young people, people of color, and Democrats (who also tend to be younger and less white). And “those with more formal education and higher incomes are more likely to get news on both mobile and desktop or laptop. Those with a college degree are more likely to often get news on mobile than those without a college degree (66 percent
Continue reading "The number of Americans who get news from mobile has nearly tripled since 2013"

Three multi-billion-dollar companies dominate the Chinese internet landscape, from news media to AI


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Internet penetration in China is at around just under 56 percent, according to a report released this year by the Chinese internet administrative agency CNNIC, which means there were around 772 million internet users in the country as of last December (and 753 million mobile internet users). These numbers have surely only grown since. (China’s still well below the U.S.’s internet penetration of 89 percent, though China’s connected population is well over twice the entire population of the U.S.) A new China Internet Report out this week was compiled jointly by 500 Startups, the South China Morning Post (SCMP), and SCMP’s China tech site Abacus, and it offers fresher numbers illustrating the reach and ambition of Chinese tech companies, the aggressive influence of the Chinese government, and the behaviors and preferences of Chinese internet (well, let’s just basically say mobile phone) users.
China-U.S. key players
Shortform video apps
Toutiao and Tencent for news
Internet penetration in rural areas of China
Continue reading "Three multi-billion-dollar companies dominate the Chinese internet landscape, from news media to AI"

Newsonomics: GateHouse’s Mike Reed talks about rolling up America’s news industry


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The news shocked long-time newspaper observers two months ago: “Tampa Bay Times to be sold to GateHouse Media in $79M deal.” Had GateHouse devoured yet another storied publisher? No: It was a FloridaPolitics.com April Fool’s prank played out to a near-incredulous audience. Mike Reed, the CEO of the New Media Investment Group that runs GateHouse, spent much of his April 1 responding to the confusion among the company’s shareholders and employees. The news wasn’t real, but it was believable: GateHouse’s acquisition appetite has seemed insatiable. The company now owns more daily titles than any other U.S. publisher, or for that matter, any newspaper publisher anywhere. In total, it owns 146 dailies — more than 10 percent of the U.S. total. That total itself may amaze some, though it well could be doubled, creating the first real national roll-up of U.S. dailies. In fact, with Continue reading "Newsonomics: GateHouse’s Mike Reed talks about rolling up America’s news industry"

Globally, internet, smartphone, and social media use is ↑, but there are big age, education, wealth, and gender gaps


This post is by Marlee Baldridge and Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Here are just a few of the global disparities surfaced in a new Pew Research Center report published on Tuesday and covering 39 countries around the world. In South Korea, nearly all of its population — 96 percent — access the internet at least “occasionally,” or own a smartphone. In the sub-Saharan African region, median internet use is below half the population — 41 percent — across six countries. In India and Japan, men were much more likely than women to access the internet. The gap also persisted in Tunisia, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Senegal. The rise of internet access (and smartphone ownership), however, has been rapid in the past couple of years, specifically in countries with developing economies surveyed by Pew.

Graphic by Marlee Baldridge, footage by Google Earth.
Individuals with higher incomes were more likely to own a smartphone. In Peru, for instance, about 60 percent of those reporting Continue reading "Globally, internet, smartphone, and social media use is ↑, but there are big age, education, wealth, and gender gaps"

For the World Cup, livestreamed online video is threatening to score the equalizer on traditional TV


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Nearly as many people plan to watch this summer’s World Cup via livestreamed video as on regular ol’ live TV, a new study out today from the Interactive Advertising Bureau says. It’s another sign (if we still need one) of how even live sports — cable companies’ best hope for saving something like the traditional channel bundle — is giving way to digital. IAB’s study — which surveyed 4,200 people in 21 countries around the world — found 71 percent said they were extremely or probably likely to watch matches live on TV, versus 65 percent online. In some countries, digital streaming actually beat TV — including in China (+6 percentage points), Russia (+7), Saudi Arabia (+2), United Arab Emirates (+1), and even the United States (+1). (American soccer fans have lots of unused rooting capacity ready to assign to one of the 32 countries that actually qualified for the
Continue reading "For the World Cup, livestreamed online video is threatening to score the equalizer on traditional TV"

A year after Trump’s zero-budget threat, public broadcasting is…doing okay


This post is by Marlee Baldridge from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It was barely a year ago that PBS and NPR fans were worried about whether American public broadcasting might be about to disappear. President Trump’s initial budget called for eliminating all funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the backbone of the system. But that budget threat turned out to be just that — CPB got its money. And according to this year’s State of the Media Report update from Pew, American public broadcasting is…actually doing pretty okay. In public radio, the average weekly broadcast audiences of the top 20 NPR member stations continue to grow — from 8.7 million in 2015 to 11.2 million last year. NPR’s mobile strategy seems to be working too: It’s seen monthly sessions in the NPR News and Continue reading "A year after Trump’s zero-budget threat, public broadcasting is…doing okay"

The scariest chart in Mary Meeker’s slide deck for newspapers has gotten even a teeny bit scarier


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It’s an annual moment of print realism here at Nieman Lab: the posting of the attention/advertising slide from Mary Meeker’s state-of-the-Internet slide deck. It’s enough of a tradition that I can now copy-and-paste from multiple versions of this post. Here’s a sentence from the 2013 version:
For those who don’t know it, Meeker — formerly of Morgan Stanley, at VC firm Kleiner Perkins since late 2010 — each year produces a curated set of data reflecting what she sees as the major trends in Internet usage and growth. It may be the only slide deck that qualifies as an event unto itself.
And a chunk from the 2014 version:
What’s useful about Meeker’s deck is that its core data serves as a punctuation mark on some big, ongoing trends. The kind of trends we all know are happening, but whose annual rate of progress can be hard to
mary-meeker-adshare-2011
mary-meeker-adshare-2012
mary-meeker-adshare-2013
mary-meeker-chart-2014
mary-meeker-adshare-2015
Continue reading "The scariest chart in Mary Meeker’s slide deck for newspapers has gotten even a teeny bit scarier"

Mobile visits are still rising for news sites, even without Facebook’s juicy traffic, according to Chartbeat data


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Traditionally — as much of a tradition as there can be in the online analytics world — people accessing sites via mobile has mostly meant people arriving from social media. But now, post-Facebook algorithm changes, the number of mobile readers visiting news sites directly has surpassed the number visiting from Facebook. (Reminder: Starting in mid-October, Facebook began tweaking the News Feed algorithm away from Page content — a.k.a. many publishers — and toward “meaningful interactions.” Some publishers have experienced such a significant drop in traffic that it contributed to the shuttering of the site or layoffs. But many of those in those affected buckets relied on Facebook’s algorithm as the core of their business model. Not the sturdiest choice.) New data from Chartbeat shows that, while Facebook traffic has been (unsurprisingly) declining since the October 2017 change, both Google Search and direct traffic have been steadily
Continue reading "Mobile visits are still rising for news sites, even without Facebook’s juicy traffic, according to Chartbeat data"

Newsonomics: Still another Tronc drama, as John Lynch re-enters the business


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Tronc doesn’t do anything by the book. Even as much of the company’s turbulence looks to be clearing, new questions are emerging about who will next lead the big metro chain. Softbank and Apollo Global Management have reportedly expressed real interest in buying the company, but much more likely is the reemergence of one of the many characters who have have upended business as usual in the roiled daily newspaper industry. Tronc’s newspapers, staff, and readers may soon be subject to a whole new round of strategic rethinks and re-deployments. Let’s first focus on the potential impact of Michael Ferro’s sale of his dominating Merrick Media 25 percent share in Tronc. That surprising sale prompted all kinds of speculation about the future, including mine. The sale looked like a homecoming story: A McCormick had bought back into the Chicago Tribune’s parent company, Tronc. Sargent McCormick, described as a distant relation Continue reading "Newsonomics: Still another Tronc drama, as John Lynch re-enters the business"

Newsonomics: The news world will miss Michael Ferro


This post is by from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




On Friday afternoon, Tronc announced that its lead shareholder Merrick Media, led by just-resigned board chairman Michael Ferro, was selling its entire stake in the company. McCormick Media — managed by Sargent McCormick, a distant relative of the McCormick family that controlled the Chicago Tribune for most of its long history — is the buyer of Ferro’s 9 million shares. As we sort out the impact of the sale on the Chicago Tribune and the rest of Tronc’s remaining newspapers, we offer this publishing obit for the would-be impresario who grabbed so many headlines of his own in the last two years.
Michael Ferro loved nothing better than entertaining a room of people with his wit and wisdom. Many of those entertained tell stories about how no one else had to even worry about coming up with their own tales; they only had to sit back and take it in. Continue reading "Newsonomics: The news world will miss Michael Ferro"

Here’s what we know so far about Google Chrome’s mobile article recommendations, the next major traffic driver for publishers


This post is by Josh Schwartz from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Two weeks ago, we published an analysis showing the rise of Google Chrome Suggestions(GCS) — suggested links that appear in any new tab of Chrome on mobile devices. In response, we received an outpouring of questions on Twitter and email. While other major referral sources are relatively well-understood, GCS or “Articles for you” is new enough that, as far as we’ve seen, there is essentially no information out there describing its traffic. With that in mind, and with much still unknown, we wanted to walk through what we can say about GCS traffic.

What Google Chrome Suggestions is (and isn’t) and how we measure it

When you open a new tab of Chrome on an iOS or Android device, Google provides an automated list of “Articles for you.” On Android, when a visitor clicks on one of these links, the referrer is set to www.googleapis.com/auth/chrome-content-suggestions. In
Continue reading "Here’s what we know so far about Google Chrome’s mobile article recommendations, the next major traffic driver for publishers"