The New York Times brings its summer pop-up newsletter back for a second season, with lessons learned


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Summer is fleeting, as is The New York Times’ summer newsletter, which is returning for its second year this week. It will run through Labor Day. In the intervening winter months, the Times surveyed readers and applied what they learned to the newsletter’s second summer — here are some of the changes they’re making:
  1. Readers loved the 2018 newsletter — it had more than 80,000 subscribers by the end of the summer — but also found it to be too long. “People thought it was hard to scan,” said Jessica Anderson, a senior staff editor for newsletters, who’s taking over Summer in the City this year from Elisabeth Goodridge, the Times’ deputy travel editor (and the former editorial director for newsletters). So it’s being cut this year, from around 2,200 words to 1,200 (and hopefully won’t get cut off on mobile so much). “Last year we provided two Continue reading "The New York Times brings its summer pop-up newsletter back for a second season, with lessons learned"

Is the email newsletter a business product or an editorial responsibility?


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Newsletters abound in 2018’s reshaping media market — helping to expand the subscription funnel and subvert social media algorithms, among other causes. There are plenty of panels, case studies, and lists of questions about how you can improve yours in the newfound age of email newsletters. But saying “make me a newsletter” is easier than actually putting in the work for the newsletter to happen successfully. Harvard’s Shorenstein Center has also been keeping a watchful eye on newsletters, in particular how they interact with nonprofit digital newsrooms. Shorenstein’s Single Subject News Project works with, well, single-subject newsrooms including local education network Chalkbeat, inequality and innovation in education-focused The Hechinger Report, criminal justice investigative outlet The Marshall Project, Continue reading "Is the email newsletter a business product or an editorial responsibility?"

What works (and doesn’t) for advertising your news organization’s subscriptions


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Your logo isn’t that cool anymore. But talking about what your audience can gain from following you is. A new report from the Center for Media Engagement at the University of Texas at Austin, written by Natalie Stroud, Yujin Kim, and Jessica Collier studied different ways news organizations proffer themselves to potential subscribers through the lens of paid Facebook ads promoting their subscriptions. In a nutshell: “People aren’t persuaded by logos or messages conveying what’s at stake, and they want to sign up for free newsletters more than they want to pay for a subscription,” Collier said. In a study funded by the American Press Institute, CME worked with six news organizations that already have a reputation for bringing in subscription or donor money (only three newsrooms were included in the experimental portion). The news organizations, ranging from a large local newspaper in the southwest to a
Continue reading "What works (and doesn’t) for advertising your news organization’s subscriptions"

How The Wall Street Journal is revamping its newsletters — and trying to add some whimsy


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Wall Street Journal is not exactly known for its sense of whimsy — but that’s what the folks revamping its newsletter system are aiming for. When Cory Schouten and Annemarie Dooling (formerly of CJR/Indianapolis Business Journal and Vox Media, respectively) joined the Journal’s newsletter team earlier this year, they embarked on the journey of whittling down the paper’s 126 newsletters. Some were automated but didn’t generate many clicks; others had a little more voice, but a pretty dry voice nonetheless. That whittling has led to what are now around 40 streamlined, audience-driven emails. They can now feature market information updating in real time (even after a newsletter is sent), and coaxing non-payers toward a subscription is core to their mission and design. (This process began under product designer Cory Etzkorn three years ago and accelerated through a migration to the Campaign Monitor platform since last fall.) “When
Continue reading "How The Wall Street Journal is revamping its newsletters — and trying to add some whimsy"

All the news that’s fit for you: The New York Times’ “Your Weekly Edition” is a brand-new newsletter personalized for each recipient


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




“We have more than 55 newsletters now,” said Elisabeth Goodridge, newsletter editorial director at The New York Times. “I encourage you to sign up for all of them!” I haven’t signed up for all of them, but I did sign up for a bunch, including one so new that it’s not actually included on the Times’ newsletters page yet: Your Weekly Edition, a three-week-old “experimental newsletter [that] aims to provide you with a personalized selection of the week’s most important news, analysis and features,” using a mix of editorial curation and algorithms. One goal: to show you only things that you haven’t read already. Here’s how the Times explains it:
After choosing the most timely and impactful stories and commentary of the past seven days, our editors group them into three sets: Best of The Times Riveting journalism that we’ve published recently, including video, graphics and Continue reading "All the news that’s fit for you: The New York Times’ “Your Weekly Edition” is a brand-new newsletter personalized for each recipient"

Here’s what you need to know to build successful paid newsletters, popup newsletters, morning digests, and community newsletters


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Thinking about starting your own email newsletter? A panel at ISOJ 2018 contains a wealth of advice for launching all types of editorial newsletters, from paywalled offerings to limited-run recaps tied to popular television shows to indispensable morning digests to community-creating newsletters. Elisabeth Goodridge, editorial director of newsletters and messaging at The New York Times, presented a selection of the Times’s 55 different email newsletters (the Times newsletters benefit from some serious internal investments on the product side as well: it’s building a new email service platform for them). “You can’t just be an editor and write something and send it to somebody else,” she cautioned. “You have to know how the product is doing, how you’re going to refine it — and not just your text, but your product, your audience, and your deliverability.” Thinking about a more niche newsletter targeting a subset of your audience? Here’s The New
Continue reading "Here’s what you need to know to build successful paid newsletters, popup newsletters, morning digests, and community newsletters"

The Dutch newsletter platform Revue, with around 30,000 users, is opening up subscription features


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




For people interested in a no-frills way to spin up a new personal newsletter, there are more alternatives to Mailchimp-TinyLetter than ever. Prominent newcomers like U.S. startup Substack or the Netherlands-based Revue have focused on simplifying writing tools and streamlining software for the entire newsletter management process, from writing to sending to maintaining the subscriber list to handling paid memberships. Revue, co-founded by Martijn de Kuijper and Mohamed El Maslouhi, pitches an easy-to-use authoring interface (the company suggested Medium or Tumblr as reference points), with many small but useful additional features like video embeds or Facebook content integrations, all developed together with or as requests from its users. It’s a service centered entirely around longer, editorial newsletter writing, so significant work went into template design and email readability. The tiny team handles all technical issues and feature requests itself. There’s also some language flexibility: the profile page for
Continue reading "The Dutch newsletter platform Revue, with around 30,000 users, is opening up subscription features"

With audience engagement and live events, Finimize is finding new ways to boost readers’ financial literacy


This post is by Ricardo Bilton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




What better way to promote a daily email newsletter that sums up an industry’s latest news than…in another daily email newsletter that sums up an industry’s latest news? It’s a natural. So if you get Axios’ Login tech-industry newsletter, you may have seen some in-email ads this month promoting Finimize, a daily finance newsletter aimed at millennials. Or, if you’re one of Finimize’s 175,000 subscribers, vice versa. Finimize’s formula for drawing in more readers is straightforward: less jargon, more emoji. The London-based newsletter is designed to give its readers a crash course in financial literacy. Each day, the newsletter offers a brief digest of the day’s biggest financial stories, breaking them down in a way that it think will be most accessible to people unfamiliar with complex financial concepts. For example, earlier this month, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 1,000 points, Finimize centered its coverage around
Continue reading "With audience engagement and live events, Finimize is finding new ways to boost readers’ financial literacy"

Google AMP is now coming to a Gmail inbox near you. Do we want it?


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




You’ve got mail — and now you won’t always have to click out of your Gmail app to deal with it. After launching its Accelerated Mobile Pages framework a few years ago for a more streamlined mobile user experience in search results, Google is now bringing the framework to the precious cargo of many email newsletters. Last week Google announced that AMP will be able to make emails — those boring, tedious, things; often the most direct communication between a publisher and a news consumer — into more “interactive and actionable” experiences, a.k.a. submit an RSVP, schedule an appointment, choose a hotel room, or pin a taco recipe on Pinterest without having to leave the email. (Or, to think as a publisher might: mark a story to read later, navigate between interactive sections of an customized email newsletter, sign up for updates on a particular story — or
?
?
Continue reading "Google AMP is now coming to a Gmail inbox near you. Do we want it?"

GroundSource switched from an email newsletter to a SMS newsletter and actually got responses


This post is by Christine Schmidt from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Want to connect with and update audience. Spend time perfecting email newsletter. Ask subscribers for responses. Receive zero responses. Sound familiar? This is the trap into which GroundSource, a platform known for its messaging-based engagement tools (now also offered to newsrooms as part of the Community Listening and Engagement Fund), recently fell with its email newsletter (GroundSourced). So they launched an SMS newsletter instead. Their prompts within the email newsletter had been pleasant: “This newsletter is all about helping you better engage your community. Each week, we’ll share news, tips, and answers to questions you ask. Let us know your engagement questions by replying to this email. We’ll find a solution and share it with you and 1,500+ GroundSourced subscribers.” But nobody was taking them up on the offer. “It’s been a thing on the to-do list to restart the email newsletter, and we wanted to make
Continue reading "GroundSource switched from an email newsletter to a SMS newsletter and actually got responses"

7 Tips to Get Better Newsletter Metrics


This post is by Jason Alcorn from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Last week, MediaShift hosted an online panel on how to get better newsletter metrics. The topic was one of our most popular — for good reason. Newsletters are proving to be a reliable and measurable way for publishers to connect directly with readers. We can’t forget that email is still a platform, but at least it’s one with open standards and a higher degree of control for both sender and recipient. The New York Times’ Lindsey Goddard, Greentech Media’s Brady Pierce and Parse.ly’s Clare Carr generously shared their expertise. Watch the video here or scroll down for seven of their best tips for how to get better newsletter metrics. 1. Segment your audience. Newsletters feel personal, like a one-to-one communication. Or at least they should. By segmenting your audience and developing email products that deliver on a unique, targeted value proposition, you are likely to have the greatest success. 2. Continue reading "7 Tips to Get Better Newsletter Metrics"

4 Ways Newsletter Publishers Can Hit Open Rates Between 50 and 60 Percent


This post is by Mark Schiefelbein from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Email newsletters, which seemed all but dead at the height of the social media revolution, have made a roaring comeback. Traditional publishers like the New York Times, online specialists like Quartz and even newsletter-only publishers like TheSkimm are winning over droves of readers and creating new revenue streams at the same time with their email strategies. And there are as many newsletters as there are topics to write about. At Revue, we help tens of thousands of people, from big companies to individual writers, publish editorial newsletters that readers look forward to seeing in their inboxes. Their success turns on one metric above all else: Open Rate.

Why is the open rate crucial for editorial newsletters?

There is a wide range of newsletter metrics available to newsletter publishers: list growth, delivery, open and click rates, return on investment and more. That’s not surprising given the wide range of newsletter
Continue reading "4 Ways Newsletter Publishers Can Hit Open Rates Between 50 and 60 Percent"

Media Metrics Roundup for January 31, 2018


This post is by Jason Alcorn from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Bloomberg Digital Hires Julia Beizer As Its First Head Of Product
Max Willens / Digiday
Where can a career in audience development lead? Big places. Why Scroll Depth Is A Key Metric for Individual Pages and Article Formats
Andrew Sweeney / MetricShift
Micro-metrics can diagnose and improve low-performing content. Podcast Listeners Really Are The Holy Grail Advertisers Hoped They’d Be
Miranda Katz / Wired
A month after Apple introduced analytics, we’ve learned that listeners listen to almost everything. Here’s How To Build A Better Newsletter, According To A Bunch Of Self-Professed Newsletter Nerds
Christine Schmidt / Nieman Lab
Expert tips from HuffPost, The New Yorker, and Vox Media. Will Comedians Save The Day?
Caty Borum Chattoo / The Laughter Effect
The Center for Media & Social Impact examines comedy’s impact. Data Can Enhance Creative Projects — Just Look at Netflix
Michael Smith and Rahul Telang / Harvard Business Review
Using Continue reading "Media Metrics Roundup for January 31, 2018"

With its new newsletter director, The New Yorker wants to experiment with standalone and international-focused products


This post is by Ricardo Bilton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




For The New Yorker, newsletters have become so vital to its digital strategy that the magazine decided that it needed someone to run them exclusively. Dan Oshinsky, formerly director of newsletters at BuzzFeed, joined the magazine last August with a simple, albeit vital mandate: to centralize its newsletter operation, launch new newsletters, and help the overall email audience grow. Oshinsky has quickly made his mark on the operation, both by experimenting with new products and by tweaking existing ones. In October, he converted the magazine’s weekly cartoon newsletter into a daily humor product, hoping to capitalize on a mounting appetite among readers for a lighter take on political news. Other emails, such as the Borowitz Report newsletter, have undergone extensive A/B testing to make them more sticky with readers. At the same time, much of Oshinsky’s work has been behind the scenes. The director of newsletters role sits between Continue reading "With its new newsletter director, The New Yorker wants to experiment with standalone and international-focused products"

With its new newsletter director, The New Yorker wants to experiment with standalone and international-focused products


This post is by Ricardo Bilton from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




For The New Yorker, newsletters have become so vital to its digital strategy that the magazine decided that it needed someone to run them exclusively. Dan Oshinsky, formerly director of newsletters at BuzzFeed, joined the magazine last August with a simple, albeit vital mandate: to centralize its newsletter operation, launch new newsletters, and help the overall email audience grow. Oshinsky has quickly made his mark on the operation, both by experimenting with new products and by tweaking existing ones. In October, he converted the magazine’s weekly cartoon newsletter into a daily humor product, hoping to capitalize on a mounting appetite among readers for a lighter take on political news. Other emails, such as the Borowitz Report newsletter, have undergone extensive A/B testing to make them more sticky with readers. At the same time, much of Oshinsky’s work has been behind the scenes. The director of newsletters role sits between Continue reading "With its new newsletter director, The New Yorker wants to experiment with standalone and international-focused products"

Media Metrics Roundup for January 10, 2018


This post is by Jason Alcorn from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




MetricShift20: Honoring The Leaders in Media Metrics
Jason Alcorn / MetricShift
Our new list of trailblazers, thinkers, scholars and innovators. The Top Social Media Platform Changes In December
Tory Starr / WGBH Social
What you might have missed. How To Prepare For The Removal Of Publisher Posts From Facebook’s News Feed
Simon Galperin / Medium
Good ideas for digital publishers, no matter what happens in 2018. Why Quartz Is Churning Out Short-Run Newsletters For Big Events
Max Willens / Digiday
Check out the numbers they are getting. We Can Probably Measure Media Bias. But Do We Want To?
Tamar Wilner / Columbia Journalism Review
A Chartbeat for partisan balance? We’ve Analysed 6,500 Images That Appeared On Our Homepage And Here Is What We’ve Learned
Al Jazeera Labs / Medium
An interesting use of machine learning to analyze content.

More from MetricShift

How Charities And Non-Profits Succeed On Social Media
Benedict Continue reading "Media Metrics Roundup for January 10, 2018"

DigitalEd Panel: How to Get Better Newsletter Metrics


This post is by Jason Alcorn from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




DigitalEd Panel: How to Get Better Newsletter Metrics

DigitalEd Panel: How to Get Better Newsletter Metrics

Panel Title: How to Get Better Newsletter Metrics Moderator: Jason Alcorn, MediaShift
Panelists: Clare Carr, Parse.ly; Elisabeth Goodridge, New York Times; Brady Pierce, Greentech Media Newsletters are a direct line to your audience. In a pivot-to-reader world, there’s arguably no product more valuable for digital publishers. Not surprisingly, newsletters have been one of the most exciting media segments to watch, and in 2018 we can expect even more innovation. This live online panel will include a discussion with publishers who are at the forefront of using newsletter metrics to increase engagement, develop new products, and drive revenue for their businesses. This free online panel is sponsored by Parse.ly. Parse.ly empowers companies to understand, own and improve digital audience engagement through data, so they can ensure the work they do makes the impact it deserves. All attendee emails will be Continue reading "DigitalEd Panel: How to Get Better Newsletter Metrics"