Why ‘Dialogue Journalism’ Is Having a Moment


This post is by Tiffany Lew from MediaShift


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Turn on the TV today, and chances are you’ll see political commentators sparring. Log on to Twitter and you’ll see the latest heated tweet from President Trump. We’re living in a time of overwhelming connection thanks to the interwebs, but chances are, we’re not nearly as connected to those those who don’t hold similar beliefs. In a polarizing moment when trust in media and the government is low, a number of new projects, now commonly called “dialogue journalism,” from organizations including Spaceship Media, Hello Project and the Seattle Times are focusing on bridging communities and pushing diverse viewpoints. Dialogue journalism uses engagement projects to tap into nuanced audiences, providing them with a platform—such as a Facebook group or a video call—to encourage sometimes difficult conversations. Journalists are present to help guide the dialogue, fact check and use the platforms as a launch pad for stories. These projects attempt to use
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How Facebook Could Really Fix Itself


This post is by Bhaskar Chakravorti from MediaShift


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This article was originally published on The Conversation here. Facebook has a world of problems. Beyond charges of Russian manipulation and promoting fake news, the company’s signature social media platform is under fire for being addictive, causing anxiety and depression, and even instigating human rights abuses. Company founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg says he wants to win back users’ trust. But his company’s efforts so far have ignored the root causes of the problems they intend to fix, and even risk making matters worse. Specifically, they ignore the fact that personal interaction isn’t always meaningful or benign, leave out the needs of users in the developing world, and seem to compete with the company’s own business model. Based on The Digital Planet, a multi-year global study of how digital technologies spread and how much people trust them, which I lead at Tufts University’s Fletcher School, I
The Conversation
The Conversation
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An Experiment in Live Fact-Checking the State of the Union Speech by Trump


This post is by Bill Adair from MediaShift


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A version of this piece ran at the Duke Reporters’ Lab. Except for the moment when we almost published an article about comedian Kevin Hart’s plans for his wedding anniversary, the first test of FactStream, our live fact-checking app, went remarkably smoothly. FactStream is the first in a series of apps we at the Duke Reporters’ Lab are building as part of our Tech & Check Cooperative. We conducted a beta test during Tuesday’s State of the Union address that provided instant analysis from FactCheck.org, PolitiFact and Glenn Kessler, the Washington Post Fact Checker. Overall, the app functioned quite well, with only 2 glitches and mainly positive feedback. Our users got 32 fact-checks during the speech and the Democratic response. Some were links to previously published checks while others were “quick takes” that briefly explained the relative accuracy of Trump’s claim. When President Trump said “we enacted the biggest
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Why Social Media Editors Should be Better Integrated into Newsrooms


This post is by Tiffany Lew from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Picture this: You’re in a bustling newsroom. The social media team is organizing an engagement project on a major story, working with reporters to find sources online, and informing them of audience feedback. The project isn’t yet finished, but the social team is already an integral part of it. When it’s time to present and promote the piece, they know what to do and which readers to tap into because they were an included in the editorial process. That’s a lovely idea, but in reality, the newsroom is often a lonely place for the social team. Rather than being fully engaged in the editorial process, social media teams—or possibly just a lone social media editor—are scrambling to publish content on Facebook, churn out copy, and follow analytics moment by moment. Exercising creativity and collaborating with other teams get lost amidst budget cuts, time constraints and the real pressures of the
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Will Comment Sections Fade Away, Or Be Revived By New Technologies?


This post is by Trent Erickson from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




A version of this piece appeared at J-Source. The New York Times and Washington Post are two of the world’s most influential newspapers. Every day, they battle over sources and jostle for a better story. So it’s extraordinary that the two rivals have teamed up to create software to run comment sections. The alliance began in 2013, at a news industry conference where Aron Pilhofer, the Times’ interactive news editor, and Cory Haik, the Post’s executive director of emerging news products, bumped into each other. The two shared troubles their papers were experiencing with comment sections and decided to work together to fix them. That conversation would grow into the Coral Project, a collaboration between the two journalism giants, and later Mozilla with its open-source software know-how. The New York-based project aims to use this software to improve comment sections. In 2015, Andrew Losowsky, a journalist, became the project’s lead. He says, “It
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How Small Publishers Can Survive and Thrive After Facebook’s News Feed Change


This post is by Ned Berke from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




A version of this post appeared on Medium.

Facebook announced on January 11 that it’s rolling out changes to the News Feed over the coming weeks to deprioritize posts from publishers, organizations, and businesses in favor of those from family and friends. In Facebook parlance, the News Feed will “prioritize posts that spark conversations and meaningful interactions between people.”

In newsrooms large and small, the change immediately aroused angst — and anger — among social media managers who depend on the platform to reach and engage audiences, and those feelings are deepened by competing, confusing interpretations of Facebook-speak into real world strategies.

I spend a lot of time working with small publishers —especially niche and community publications with editorial teams of less than 15 people (and usually closer to one), and with audiences of less than 500,000. They’re scrambling, amid mounting frustration and a dash of despair, to figure out what

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Why Twitter Polls Should Have a Warning Label


This post is by Ozan Kuru from MediaShift


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“If you want the public’s opinion on anything — what to name your dog, who will win tonight’s game, which election issue people care most about — there’s no better place to get answers than on Twitter.” This is how Twitter introduces its “Twitter Polls” feature. Twitter polls might be useful for entertainment and business, but when it comes to politics, it’s more complicated: Twitter polls are not scientific; they are not systematically conducted and therefore cannot represent public opinion. Yet surprisingly, many individuals – ordinary citizens, public officials and political leaders – treat Twitter polls as valid representation of public opinion. Whether they fail to recognize its unscientific nature or intentionally use it as a pseudo-scientific platform for promoting their views, the result is increased cacophony, misinformation and polarization in social media and beyond. Given these problems, Twitter should update its design by adding an interactive warning
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‘Latinas in Journalism’ Leverages Social Media to Create Community, Open Doors


This post is by Laura Castaneda from MediaShift


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When it comes to hiring and promoting Latinas in newsrooms, the powers that be often blame a lack of progress on their inability to find enough candidates with the requisite qualifications, also known as the “pipeline” problem. As a response, Dallas-based former television reporter Rebecca Aguilar launched a Facebook page called “Latinas in Journalism.” Within four hours of its November launch, the page got 200 members. Within three days, it was up to 1,000. Today, it has almost 1,400 members and more joining daily. The page is used to share job postings, internship notices, news stories, advice and encouragement and its members  include full-time Latina journalists, editors, producers, freelancers, academics and students of all ages and experience levels who work in English, Spanish or both.

Opening the Door Ourselves

“If no one else will open the doors for us, we will open them,” says Aguilar, adding that the word “diversity”
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Social Virtual Reality Tips for Facebook Spaces


This post is by Amara Aguilar from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Stepping into Facebook Spaces for the first time was a surreal blend of animated avatars, 360 photos and social media.

On their own, these are powerful elements for storytelling. Combining them into a social virtual reality app like Spaces, however, means a new world of possibilities. What is Facebook Spaces, and how could we use it for journalism? I set out to gain insights about this app in the context of telling stories, and as I discovered tips and practical uses, I also learned more about limitations when using this technology.

During a social virtual reality workshop in November at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, I put on an Oculus Rift headset and listened to verbal directions on how to use the two Oculus Touch hand controllers. My eyes veered all over as I soaked in this 360-degree, cartoon-like world. I clutched controllers that

A virtual selfie stick and capability to go live on Facebook are some of the features of Facebook Spaces.
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How Bots Are Threatening Online Discourse


This post is by John Gray from MediaShift


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The 2016 US Presidential election elevated the issue of social media bots and “fake news” to an unprecedented level of attention. Yet for all of the headlines it’s an issue that’s both complex and in many ways misunderstood. Social media bots (automated software designed to perform specific tasks, such as retweeting or liking specific content on Twitter) are a problem because of the part they play in spreading misinformation. What’s still lost in the commentary, however, is that simply proving bots’ existence, let alone purging them from social platforms, is extremely difficult. With these fake entities meshing deeply into the fabric of cyberspace, the biggest threat they pose is of turning it into a place devoid of human discourse. Since the beginning of 2017, my team at Mentionmapp Analytics been tracking bots, sockpuppets (real people operating behind fake profiles, and usually promoting specific points of view) and the flow of
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Netizen Report: New Research Tests Facebook’s Digital ‘On Ramp’ for Developing Countries


This post is by Global Voices Advocacy Netizen Report Team from MediaShift


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Global Voices Advocacy’s Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world. This week Global Voices released an original research report on Free Basics, an app built by Facebook that is intended to serve as an “on ramp” to using the global internet. Now active in 63 countries across Africa, Asia and Latin America, the app does not get users onto the global internet, but rather gives them access to Facebook and a handful of online services, ranging from ESPN and Disney to BBC and Wikipedia, all free of charge. In their promotional materials for the program, Facebook posits that: “[by] introducing people to the benefits of the internet” they will help justify the cost of mobile data and thereby “bring more people online and help improve their lives.” A group of Global Voices contributors decided to test their theory this
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How the State of Local News Varies (and Doesn’t) Around the World


This post is by Damian Radcliffe from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Too often, discussions about the state of journalism tend to be national-centric. Given differences across markets, this is not surprising. However, there are often more similarities than many people realize. This April, at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia, I convened a panel of four experts to explore some of these parallels – and differences – in the realm of local journalism.

The state of local

The past decade has not been challenging for much of the news industry. But, in the USA,  Christopher Ali from the University of Virginia argues small local newspapers (those with a circulation of 50,000 or less) have “been able to weather a lot of the storms that have faced metro and national newspapers.” There are a myriad of reasons for this, including the fact these outlets are often “the only news voice in the community.”  “So, they have a built-in readership
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What AJ+ Is Learning About News Bots


This post is by Ryan Lindsay from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This guest post is published in partnership with the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Advanced Media Institute. Tawanda Kanhema has a thing for apps. Facebook Messenger apps, to be specific. In November, Kanhema was a part of the AJ+ team who developed a messaging bot for Election Day 2016. “We were looking for ideas on how to cover the election differently beyond just creating video and media posts,” said Kanhema. “We wanted to give our viewers and readers a way to connect with our reporting of the election.” Enter Mila, the Election Bot
Her name was Mila and over the course of Election Day, she fielded pictures and information from thousands of voters across the country, while providing almost instantaneous updates upon request. Initially, Mila was only designed to send election updates. A user could ask, “Who’s leading in the election?” and Mila would zero in on
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The Election and the Media: Lessons Learned From the New York Times


This post is by Bianca Fortis from MediaShift


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Covering the 2016 presidential election has been unlike any other, according to New York Times reporters and editors. The news organization’s normal standards for figuring out how to cover a divisive political race, primarily relying on expert voices to help navigate complexities, “started to feel not quite right,” said Managing Editor Joseph Kahn. Kahn made the comments during the New York Times’ Election Night Live event, hosted Tuesday night at The Times Center in New York City, during which journalists and other guests gave commentary in real-time while election results were coming in. Kahn explained that the election encouraged the Times to experiment with new ways of storytelling. For example, putting a camera in the middle of a Donald Trump rally and letting supporters speak for themselves brought to light some issues, particularly the anger swelling among voters, that needed to be confronted during this cycle.

The Role of
The New York Times received some backlash for its decision to call Donald Trump a liar in two stories and in a headline. Staffers explained that decision on Tuesday night.
During a New York Times Election Night Live event, reporters and editors discussed the role of the media during the 2016 presidential and shared was it was like to cover the candidates. Photo by Gage Skidmore on Flickr and used with Creative Commons license.
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Storyclash’s Top Social Media Interactions for Publishers and Stories in October 2016


This post is by Manuel Brosch from MediaShift


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Each month, MediaShift will post a chart from Storyclash ranking publishers and news stories that get the most social media interactions. Storyclash regularly publishes rankings of Social Media Trends, covering online articles with the most social media interactions on Facebook and Google+. Below is a look at the top stories and publishers in Storyclash’s anlysis for the month of October and it should be no surprise: election news dominated what people shared, liked and engaged with. While Little Things still tops the rankings, interactions did drop for the publisher in October, and the Huffington Post’s interactions are climbing. Storyclash tracks social media interactions around thousands of stories every minute, giving newsrooms a real-time view of what’s trending right now. With Storyclash Insights, publishers are able to react on trends, watch competitors in real-time and make data driven decisions to optimize their content. Manuel Brosch is marketing manager at Storyclash.
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How Snapchat is Changing the Way We Communicate


This post is by Bethany Swain from MediaShift


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Bethany Swain admits on Snapchat that "sometimes I get carried away snapchatting sequences." (Snapchat selfie: Bethany Swain)

Bethany Swain admits on Snapchat that “sometimes I get carried away snapchatting sequences.” (Snapchat selfie: Bethany Swain)

Thousands of years ago, cavemen painted in caves to tell stories. Today, my students’ favorite way to share stories is an app where their posts disappear after they’ve been watched. Unlike the cave paintings of bison and birds, Snapchats are only designed to last 24 hours after they’ve been shared. Snapchat is changing the way we communicate. The app is affecting our audience, even if you don’t use the social media platform. I noticed changes in video throughout all my social media, and I don’t think it’s a coincidence that I began seeing these changes at the same time I started to use Snapchat. I was confused when my students first asked me to join Snapchat. I didn’t understand the appeal of an app with disappearing messages. But this is an appealing way
Susan Shinn UMD '17 works on a story for her ViewFinder capstone class. Her video is produced horizontally because it will be enjoyed on numerous platforms (snapchat: Bethany Swain)
Bradleigh Chance UMD '15 works for NBC and ran the @MSNBC Snapchat account for a behind the scenes look at the red carpet at the White House Correspondents Dinner on April 30, 2016.
Multiple screens for breaking news (Photo: Bethany Swain).
Good Luck America with Peter Hamby is an example of the original content Snapchat is creating for the audience to consume in their app, on their phones.
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5 Top Tips and Tools For the Social Media Reporter


This post is by Cordelia Hebblethwaite from MediaShift


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Social media has become such an important part of the fabric of our culture and society. And that means it is really important for journalists to be social media literate… beyond just the basics of knowing how to tweet or post to Facebook! Journalists need to know how to sift through, analyze, understand and interpret what is going on. A couple of months ago, I published The Social Media Reporter, which aims to help journalists do just that. It’s a free online guide that aims to demystify social media and provide practical, concise tips for navigating through the sea of information.
Screenshot.

Screenshot.

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I first got interested in this field when I helped launch BBC Trending at the end of 2013, and I then had the opportunity to really dive deep as a John S. Knight Journalism fellow at
Creative commons photo.
Creative Commons photo.
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Looking Beyond Comments, Spot.IM Wants to Build a Platform for ‘Deep Engagement’


This post is by Ben DeJarnette from MediaShift


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Spot.IM is best known for helping publishers streamline and spam-proof their comments sections. But on the heels of a $13 million Series A funding round announced last month, the four-year-old company is looking to expand its role in the digital publishing world. “Our goal is not just to build comments for publishers, it’s to build a community,” Spot.IM co-founder and CEO Nadav Shoval said. “Our goal is to turn any website into an engaged community.”
“Everything you can imagine that a social network should have, we’re going to provide publishers for free.” - Nadav Shoval
By strengthening Spot.IM’s social networking features, Shoval and Ishay Green, co-founder and CTO, want to help publishers take back their audience engagement (and digital ad revenue) from platforms like Facebook and Twitter, which currently boast better networking tools, more appealing interfaces, and faster download speeds than what most digital
Spot.IM
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Remix: How to Use Snapchat in the Classroom


This post is by Jon Zmikly from MediaShift


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Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

Click the image to read the whole series. Original photo by Flickr user Richard Ha used here under Creative Commons.

As a digital media instructor, I love using social media to engage with my students. Whether we’re using class-specific hashtags on Twitter to share relevant news items or Facebook groups as a forum for job and internship postings, social media can be an invaluable classroom supplement. Particularly useful for mass communication courses, my students have learned valuable skills and to think critically and professionally about each platform and its impact on the media industry as a whole.
But when Snapchat arrived on the scene a few years ago, I was leery. It was different from the others. Disappearing messages didn’t seem like the most effective way for storytelling, and its dark beginnings as a sexting app for teenagers made it feel less … journalistic. Profiles aren’t “public.” It’s hard
I like to provide previews and wrap-ups of course material to engage students throughout the week.
Snapchat messenger has been surprisingly useful with visual projects where I can see a student's computer screen, and we can communicate seamlessly.
During SXSW Interactive, students followed my updates and interacted with the class-related content I provided.
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3 Secrets to Business Insider’s Success on LinkedIn


This post is by Meena Thiruvengadam from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Click the image for more in this series.

Click the image for more in this series.

As LinkedIn regulars know, LinkedIn isn’t just for job searches – it’s for news.
Over the last few years, it has become clear that people are posting – and reading – more news on the platform. In fact, according to a recent Pew Research survey, nearly 20 percent of LinkedIn’s audience uses it to access news.
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At Business Insider, we’re seeing this translate into a growing audience, increased referral traffic and an opportunity to interact with users who are among our most loyal and engaged. For us, LinkedIn is part of a multi-platform (distributed) approach to content. It is no surprise given the makeup of our readership – the “next generation of business leaders” – that LinkedIn is among our top sources of social referral traffic. Furthermore, each of our three
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