How Racked redesigned its site with distributed platforms in mind


This post is by Joseph Lichterman from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Vox Media on Monday is launching a redesign of Racked, the company’s fashion and shopping site, to try and grow its audience beyond young women while also rethinking its distribution strategy with a renewed focus on email newsletters and Facebook video. “We’re training our team — our reporters, our editors, and our video team — everyone who is bringing their ideas to Racked, encouraging them to think in a platform-agnostic way,” Racked editor-in-chief Britt Aboutaleb said. “What is the story you want to tell and then from there what is the best way to tell that story? That might mean a 2,000-word feature, it might mean a video, it might mean a newsletter-first feature.” Racked’s refresh comes as Vox Media as a whole is looking to expand how it approaches off-platform and distributed publishing. The Verge, earlier this month, refreshed its website and the graphic identity it uses Continue reading "How Racked redesigned its site with distributed platforms in mind"

Media Metrics Roundup for November 2, 2016


This post is by Jason Alcorn from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Why CNN Will Be All In on Kik on Election Night

(Jeanine Poggi / AdAge)
Users have exchanged 17.6 million messages with the CNN bot. ?

How The Verge is Building a News Site for the Distributed Age

(Joseph Lichterman / NiemanLab)
One publisher’s answer to the platforms dilemma.

My Reading List as a Data Scientist

(Chris Choy / Medium)
If you read Sexy Little Numbers, let us know how it is.

Your Fall 2016 Guide to Facebook Publishing

(NewsWhip)
An all-in-one resource for all you Facebook page managers.

The Potential and Pitfalls of Email Newsletters

(Andrew Jack / Reuters Institute)
We love them now but what about user fatigue and saturation?

From MetricShift

How I Built a #MetricShiftBot by Tim Cigelske How Much is Investigative Journalism Worth? by Lindsay Green-Barber 4 Things Newsrooms Can Learn from Nonprofits About Impact by Jason Tomassini #MetricShift Chat: The Metrics of Fact and Fiction Continue reading "Media Metrics Roundup for November 2, 2016"

Must Reads in Media & Technology: Nov. 2


This post is by Kelly O'Mara from MediaShift


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Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.

1. Refreshing The Verge: How Does This Thing Make Money, Anyway? (Nilay Patel / The Verge)

2. Gannett’s Giving Up On Tronc. So What Will It Buy Next? (Rick Edmonds / Poynter)

3. YouTube’s Seven-Year Music Battle Ends in Germany (Stefan Nicola / Bloomberg Technology)

4. Scribd Adds Magazines to Its $8.99/Month Reading Subscription, and Says It’s Profitable (Laura Hazard Owen / Nieman Lab)

5. The New York Times is Launching a Daily 360-Degree Video Series (Joseph Lichterman / Nieman Lab)

6. Q&A: BuzzFeed’s CEO Says It Would Be ‘Much Bigger’ If ComScore Tracked Its Mobile Stats (Lauren Johnson / AdWeek)

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As The Verge turns five, here’s how it’s thinking about building a news site for the distributed age


This post is by Joseph Lichterman from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Verge launched five years ago today — a lifetime ago in the online news business. The site was designed for the desktop with bold, chunky visuals; the colorful rectangles on the home page were a departure from the timeline-style homepages common then. < div class="conl">Lichterman: We wrote a story last year about how The Verge was thinking about expanding beyond just gadget coverage to culture, larger tech issues, and entertainment. It sounds as if that’s something you’re continuing to think about.[/conr] < div class="conr">Patel: Yeah, every day. I wrote a post about a new mission statement. It was really about focus. Dieter [Bohn, The Verge’s executive editor] and I took over about two years ago, and we tried a whole bunch of new things. It was really exciting, and a lot of those things panned out. I’m really pleasantly surprised about how many of our bets have paid off, but now our Continue reading "As The Verge turns five, here’s how it’s thinking about building a news site for the distributed age"

Bloomberg’s new global chief of digital innovation on the company’s careful hunt for new audiences


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


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Ensconced within the larger Bloomberg empire, Bloomberg’s editorial operations are in an enviably comfortable position. “If you look at our approach at how we play on platforms that we don’t own, compared to other media companies, you’ll see we do it a little differently, because we’re part of a bigger exceedingly well-capitalized, healthy — for lack of a better term — technology company,” Michael Shane, Bloomberg Media’s newly appointed global head of digital innovation, told me. “So we aren’t subject to the stormy winds of the rest of the media industry.” michael-shane-headshotShane was previously managing editor for Bloomberg digital and before that director of operations at The Verge, which he joined shortly after its launch — and before that, a professional clarinetist. He was especially confident in the new readership he felt Bloomberg was poised to attract globally, and the monetization opportunities that come from building a Continue reading "Bloomberg’s new global chief of digital innovation on the company’s careful hunt for new audiences"

Deputy Editor for Tech Site Was Simultaneously Working for Apple for 2 Months


This post is by Josh Feldman from Mediaite


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appleIn a stunning admission of a serious conflict of interest, the editor-in-chief from tech site The Verge revealed today that one of their deputy editors was pulling double-duty working for Apple for a whole two months. And for those two months, no one at Apple had any idea. Verge EIC Nilay Patel posted a note online today in response to questions about Ziegler’s recent absence from the site:
Chris began working for Apple in July, but didn’t tell anyone at The Verge that he’d taken a new job until we discovered and verified his dual-employment in early September. Chris continued actively working at The Verge in July, but was not in contact with us through most of August and into September. During that period, in the dark and concerned for Chris, we made every effort to contact him and to offer him help if needed. We ultimately terminated his employment Continue reading "Deputy Editor for Tech Site Was Simultaneously Working for Apple for 2 Months"

How Vox Media’s new Storytelling Studio thinks of stories as products


This post is by Taylyn Washington-Harmon from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When Hillary Clinton takes the stage in Philadelphia tonight to accept the Democratic nomination for president, it will be the peak of a lifetime spent in politics. And over that lifetime, she’s been the subject of an almost incalculable amount of media coverage. When Vox.com wanted to add to that mountain with a Clinton interview and profile by editor-in-chief Ezra Klein, it wanted to build something different — something that felt more digitally native than straightforward longform. The Clinton project became a digital, multi-platform package. Optimized for Facebook Instant Articles, the 6,300-word-plus piece, complete with video and archival photographs, loads in under a second flat. Alongside the essay, Vox published the full transcript of the 41-minute interview complete with annotations and visualized data. Going beyond the website component, the interview was filmed and annotated for YouTube, allowing users to search and watch exactly what they want Hillary to Continue reading "How Vox Media’s new Storytelling Studio thinks of stories as products"

Vox Media creates a Snapchat Studio, and SB Nation is going bilingual with the help of Telemundo


This post is by Shan Wang from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Vox Media announced a bunch of new partnerships Wednesday (see: corporate synergy), including a new partnership between SB Nation and Telemundo to create “the first-ever mobile, bilingual sports property to reach Hispanic millennial sports fans,” and an expanded partnership with Snapchat to include content from all eight Vox Media brands on its Discover channel. Vox also said it would be building out a “Snapchat Studio” focus on creating content from sites like The Verge and Racked, in addition to Vox.com. Vox.com launched on Snapchat Discover in November, and early on hired dedicated Snapchat producers to craft stories for the platform. Vox Media also hired Awl network co-founder Choire Sicha as director of partner platforms in February, specifically to help refine the company’s strategies when it comes to dealing with places like Snapchat and Facebook and Google. Other partnerships announced today include ones between SB Nation and Continue reading "Vox Media creates a Snapchat Studio, and SB Nation is going bilingual with the help of Telemundo"

The Verge launches Circuit Breaker, a gadget blog-as-Facebook page


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Is Facebook the new RSS? Vox Media’s tech site The Verge is trying something that might answer that question: It’s launching a gadget “blog,” Circuit Breaker, that will live primarily as a Facebook page, with posts appearing in the Instant Articles format. The New York Times’ John Herrman, who first reported the news, wrote:
Circuit Breaker will be edited by Paul Miller, a former employee of The Verge who is returning to the company. Mr. Miller said the new page would reach for a “core audience” of hard-core gadget fans. The Verge offers some popular gadget coverage, but Mr. Miller said many of those gadget fans “feel neglected when we’re talking about Netflix” and technology’s role in the broader culture. The page will also steer clear of covering the business of tech, leaving industry stories to The Verge or Recode, the tech news site founded by Continue reading "The Verge launches Circuit Breaker, a gadget blog-as-Facebook page"

Oculus Rift for news? Not quite yet


This post is by Joseph Lichterman from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After years of anticipation and waiting, the Oculus Rift VR headset is finally here. Facebook-owned Oculus began shipping pre-ordered headsets today. The Rift retails for $599 — plus you need a special high-powered PC to run the VR headset. (Sorry Mac owners.) If you want to order a Rift today, it won’t ship until July.

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The first reviews of the consumer version of the Rift were also published today, and there was a near consensus: The Rift is a solid first step into mainstream VR, but the computing power necessary to use it along with its prohibitive price will limit its adoption.

“It could be a smart decision to limit the Rift’s initial market to consumers ready to invest in the commitment of virtual reality. That could also be an obstacle to its growth,” Mashable’s Chelsea Stark wrote. “While we ponder this, on the precipice of virtual reality’s wide Continue reading "Oculus Rift for news? Not quite yet"

From Nieman Reports: Melissa Bell of Vox Media on the online publisher’s embrace of Snapchat, its spirit of collaboration, and more


This post is by Jonathan Seitz from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The benefit of building a brand that audiences recognize will, in the end, allow us to continue to build a strong revenue model and a strong connection to an audience. If they see us on Snapchat and Snapchat has a very large audience, then they get to know and trust Vox and see it as a source that they care about. If 10 percent of that audience finds us on YouTube, five percent finds us on Facebook, and two percent finds us on Twitter, that’s great. There’s a revenue opportunity with Snapchat, and we can use that to support the journalism that we’re doing elsewhere. You have to think about your brand as an interconnected ethos that should exist in multiple places. Walt Disney had an interesting idea about how his brands supported each other. The theme parks came from the movies; the movies came from his animations. The merchandise Continue reading "From Nieman Reports: Melissa Bell of Vox Media on the online publisher’s embrace of Snapchat, its spirit of collaboration, and more"

Daily Must Reads in Media & Technology, Jan. 14, 2016


This post is by Courtney Lowery Cowgill from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
  1. Al Jazeera America Terminates All TV and Digital Operations (Glenn Greenwald / The Intercept)
  2. Why Al Jazeera America Was Destined to Fail (Jordan Weissmann / Slate)

  3. The Verge Co-Founder Josh Topolsky Is Raising Money to Launch a Media Startup (Noah Kulwin / Re/Code)

  4. People Don’t Want to Trade Privacy for Targeted Ads (Rick Edmonds / Poynter)

  5. How Snapchat Plans to Compete With Facebook for Advertisers’ Dollars (Tim Peterson / AdAge)

  6. Many Americans Say They Might Provide Personal Information, Depending (Lee Rainie and Maeve Duggan / Pew Research Center)

  7. BBC Risks Excluding Viewers by Prioritizing Online Content (Paul Revoir / The Guardian)

Subscribe to our newsletter! Correction: This post has been updated to correct a Continue reading "Daily Must Reads in Media & Technology, Jan. 14, 2016"

Built on passion: How Vox Media grew from its roots as an Oakland A’s blog into one of the Internet’s biggest publishers


This post is by Joseph Lichterman from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Vox Media is now a vast digital publishing network with eight individual sites that averaged more than 160 million monthly unique visitors last year. But it didn’t start out that way. The company’s origins trace back to 2003 when Tyler Bleszinski launched Athletics Nation, a blog covering the Oakland Athletics that would eventually grow to become SB Nation. In 2015, SB Nation averaged 83 million unique visitors across its more than 300 team-specific sites. Vox Media CEO Jim Bankoff joined the company then known as SportsBlogs in 2008, and The Verge was launched in 2011. Today, Vox Media has eight editorial brands and a custom advertising division. bleszinski_400x400 Bleszinski decided to start Athletics Nation after being disappointed with the level of the coverage the team was getting from more traditional sources. “There was nobody out there covering the A’s the way I wanted them covered,” he told me. “So my Continue reading "Built on passion: How Vox Media grew from its roots as an Oakland A’s blog into one of the Internet’s biggest publishers"

Daily Must Reads Jan. 6, 2016


This post is by Courtney Lowery Cowgill from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Must Reads is MediaShift’s daily curation of the big stories about media and technology from across the web. Sign up here to get these delivered right to your inbox.
  1. Twitter Considering 10,000-Character Limit for Tweets (Kurt Wagner / Re/code)

  2. Twitter Isn’t Raising the Character Limit. It’s Becoming a Walled Garden. (Will Oremus / Slate)

  3. How The Verge is Trying to Shed Its Tech-for-Bros Image (Lucia Moses / Digiday)

  4. Reddit Is Way Bigger Than You Think It Is (Mathew Ingram / Fortune)

  5. GOP Lawmakers Call for Firing of Mizzou Professor Who Called for ‘Muscle’ (Aamer Madhani / USA Today)

  6. Adele Album Resists the Streaming Trend in Music Sales (Ben Sisario / New York Times)

  7. New York Public Library Invites a Deep Digital Dive (Jennifer Schuessler / New York Times)

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What happened after 7 news sites got rid of reader comments


This post is by from Nieman Lab


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For a short period at the end of 2014, it appeared that publishers had reached a breaking point in their ongoing struggle with reader comments. Within a few weeks of each other, Recode, Mic, The Week, and Reuters all announced that they were closing down their comment sections. They joined the ranks of other outlets, including The Chicago Sun-Times and Popular Science, that abandoned the practice in favor of letting users discuss stories on social channels instead. Many news organizations have had comments sections for as long as they’ve been online. For just as long, many have agonized over the value of the conversations that rage in the space below a story. There’s plenty of debate over the issue, as newsrooms struggle with moderation,
The 2014 baccalaureate ceremomy held in Woolsey Hall featured addresses by President Peter Salovey and Yale College Dean Mary Miller.
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Daily Must Reads, July 13, 2015


This post is by Julie Keck from MediaShift


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




  1. How to cut children’s screen time? Say no to yourself first (Jane E. Brody / New York Times)

  2. Putting the public into public media membership (Melody Kramer / Nieman Lab)

  3. Joshua Topolsky on his accomplishments at — and departure from — Bloomberg (via Joshua Topolsky)

  4. Comcast offers its alternative to cable TV, using the web (Emily Steel / New York Times)

  5. How MATTER succeeded in spite of itself (Naomi Lubick / Poynter)

  6. What it’s like to get paid for clicks (Jack Murtha / Columbia Journalism Review)

Want to make it easier to build news apps quickly? Vox Media has opensourced its solution, Autotune


This post is by from Nieman Lab


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Making a beautiful app for news is great; making a beautiful reusable app for news is better. At least that’s the thinking behind a new project released by Vox Media today: Autotune is a system meant to simplify the creation and duplication of things like data visualizations, graphics, or games. Autotune was designed by members of the Vox Media product team to cut down on the repetitive work of taking one project — say, a an image slider — and making it easy to use elsewhere. It’s “a centralized management system for your charts, graphics, quizzes and other tools, brought to you by the Editorial Products team at Vox Media,” according to the project’s GitHub page. And, yes, that means Autotune is open source. As visuals and interactives become a bigger part of online media,
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New word count, new skill set: Why Vox’s Racked hired a reports editor


This post is by Laura Hazard Owen from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Longform may get all the attention these days, but Racked — the style, shopping, and beauty site that Vox Media acquired when it bought the Curbed.com network in 2013 — is seeing a sweet spot in the middle. The site announced Tuesday that it has hired Meredith Haggerty, formerly the host of the podcast TLDR, as its new reports editor. In the role, she’ll be editing posts that fall between 1,000 and 1,500 words. The reports editor title isn’t an anomaly at Vox Media; other Vox brands, like The Verge, have people in the same role. The position is a first for Racked, however, and Leslie Price, the site’s editor-in-chief, said it was necessitated by the fact that Racked has delved into more original reporting. The site hired Julia Rubin, formerly the online features editor at Teen Vogue, as its features editor last year. “Over Continue reading "New word count, new skill set: Why Vox’s Racked hired a reports editor"

This is my next step: How The Verge wants to grow beyond tech blogging


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What will it look like to hail an Uber from your wrist? How easy will it be to buy a ticket to see Avengers: Age of Ultron using your watch? And how might a smartwatch change the way we keep time? The launch of the Apple Watch is the type of story that The Verge was built for — obsessive tunneling deep into the minutiae of the latest gadget that promises to reshape the world. You can call it their Super Bowl or their Oscars, but The Verge has major product releases down to a science: Establish a team on the ground to take on the rigors of liveblogging, have news editors and writers standing by to spin out individual stories, add in hands-on videos, and recap the proceedings to let readers grab what they need to know. This is now muscle memory across an entire newsroom, even for a site that’s only been around four years. Covering technology should come easy for a site that was created by a group of editors who jumped ship from Engadget; following the movements of Apple and Google, or tracing the latest pronouncements from Elon Musk, are what they’re built for. But tech writing is a crowded field. Recode was spun away from Dow Jones, which responded by bulking up the tech team at The Wall Street Journal. Business Insider is building a tech site of its own. BuzzFeed is bulking up its San Francisco operations. And that’s just a few of the bigger players; add in a seemingly infinite number of smaller sites, plus plenty non-technology sites moving resources into the field. What it means is that on a day like the Apple Watch release, there are no shortage of options for readers to get their fix. And even as The Verge grows — they reached 25 million monthly unique visitors in February — the site needs to find a way to stand out. Which would explain the Super Bowl commercial. Even if it only aired in Helena, Montana, the the 30-second spot tells a lot about the site’s aims for 2015. “We want to use technology as a way to define pop culture, in the way Rolling Stone used music and Wired used the early Internet,” Verge editor Nilay Patel told me. What The Verge has been doing the past six months, and will be doing for the next six, is turning itself into a site that covers pop culture, science, and even cars with the same voice they’ve trained on the world of technology. “What we’ve figure out is it’s much more than a technology site,” said Vox Media CEO Jim Bankoff. “Though
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Snapchat stories: Here’s how 6 news orgs are thinking about the chat app


This post is by Joseph Lichterman from Nieman Lab


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When Sam Sheffer, The Verge’s social media editor, launched the site’s Snapchat account at the end of July last year, he meant it to be a small-scale experiment. “I only promoted it on my personal Twitter account,” Sheffer told me. “I didn’t make it an official thing that it was our account, I just told my followers, ‘Hey guys, I’m going to be doing this thing. Follow if you want to.’” But soon the audience started growing; today, The Verge’s snaps each get about 10,000 views. The Verge, like many news organizations that are active on Snapchat, still views it as an experiment, trying out new ways to use the format — from covering live events like the NBA All-Star Game or the Oscars to a regular series where Sheffer has Verge staffers explain what’s on their desks. Snapchat’s popularity is booming. Last year, it said that its users sent more than 700 million snaps daily; the company is reportedly in a new funding round that would value the company at $19 billion. Snapchat’s potential for news outlets became more clear last month with the launch of Snapchat Discover, which lets a small number of publishers reach new younger audiences with well-produced stories that are made specifically for the platform and utilize slick graphics and video. No one is releasing hard numbers yet, but the buzz is they’re amazing. (“But from speaking to people at several other news organizations, I can tell you secondhand that the numbers, at least for the initial launch period, were enormous. We’re talking millions of views per day, per publisher.”) Continue reading "Snapchat stories: Here’s how 6 news orgs are thinking about the chat app"