Our Tweets From 11.02.2010


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Apple tells labels song previews will triple to 90 sec. if orig > than 2:30. Was expected in Sept. MacRumors |http://bit.ly/9UvRF7 — @paidContent
#Foursquare: 44,836 #election checkins (I Voted badge) so far, 22,019 venues. 58% male. Highest in NY, CA. http://bit.ly/cx6Zuw@sdkstl
Foursquare now lets venue managers impeach their mayors . http://bit.ly/cM2ajn@paidContent
TalkingBizNews: that secret WSJ project is a new platform for oveseas biz news. http://bit.ly/ahyDKf@paidContent
Amazon says it now has 10k-plus Disc+ on Demand titles. Buy DVD, watch digital 'gift' instantly. http://bit.ly/9r2mKw@paidContent
Michael Jackson Glove Bundled With Wii Game http://ow.ly/334RF@paidContent


On Twitter, the Elections Are Almost as Big as iPhone 4


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Not surprisingly, there’s lots of chatter about tomorrow’s U.S. elections on Twitter. But it’s not the only thing Twitterers are Twittering about*.

Here’s the list of Twitter’s top “Trending Topics” for the U.S., via a screenshot I took after 6 pm New York time. Unless I’m missing something (Lily Allen didn’t join the Tea Party, right?) there’s nary a political term there:

The folks over at Trendrr, who make a living sifting through social media for interesting data, definitely do show a big surge in political Tweets**. These three charts show the spike in usage for Republican candidates’ names, Democratic candidates and election-related terms in general (click to enlarge):

Roll all that up together, and you’re at perhaps 23,000 mentions per hour. Which is a lot–but it’s no iPhone 4: On the day that Apple rolled out its latest phone last spring, it was generating a peak of 55,000 mentions per hour, says Trendrr.

Still, this data comes from the mid-afternoon on the day before elections, and we can assume it will increase throughout the next 24 hours. The Washington Post certainly thinks it’s worth paying attention to Twitter during the election: The paper is buying the word “election” as a Promoted Trend tomorrow. We’ll check back in with Trendrr on Tuesday for an update….

*Hope I got that right. **That’s right, right?

[Image credit: Library of Congress via Flickr]

Twitter Starts Bringing Ads To Users’ Streams


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Twitter

When Twitter introduced its ad platform back in April, the company said ads would eventually show up in a user’s stream. That’s finally happening, although only to a limited extent for now. The company says it will be putting “promoted Tweets” (it has consistently refused to call them ads) in the streams of users of popular Twitter client HootSuite.

In April, Twitter said that third-party Twitter clients would be able to choose whether or not to distribute the “promoted Tweets” to their own users. Those that did, executives said, would get 50 percent of the resulting ad revenue. AdAge says Virgin America, Starbucks (NSDQ: SBUX) and Red Bull, will all be putting their ads in the streams of HootSuite users.

Twitter is calling this a test and says it will be “carefully looking at how Twitter users react to and engage with Promoted Tweets in the timeline” and says it “will expand the rollout only when we feel we’re delivering a high-quality user experience.” It’s clear, though, that this is very much the direction Twitter’s ad platform is heading.

Related


Twitter Starts Bringing Ads To Users’ Streams


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Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Twitter

When Twitter introduced its ad platform back in April, the company said ads would eventually show up in a user’s stream. That’s finally happening, although only to a limited extent for now. The company says it will be putting “promoted Tweets” (it has consistently refused to call them ads) in the streams of users of popular Twitter client HootSuite; HootSuite gets a cut of ad sales.

Twitter is calling it a test and says it will be “carefully looking at how Twitter users react to and engage with Promoted Tweets in the timeline” and says it “will expand the rollout only when we feel we’re delivering a high-quality user experience.” It’s clear, though, that this is very much the direction Twitter’s ad platform is heading.

Related


Our Tweets From 10.28.2010


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QOTD: "Boom baby, that's what we're going to do," says Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer on Windows Phone 7. — @josephtartakoff
Conan online marketing juggernaut continues with 'Show Zero' stunt Nov. 1; simulcast on YouTube, Facebook http://bit.ly/amnr1u@awallenstein
Fund My Media 2.0 for journalism startups streaming live @jlab: http://bit.ly/dug1H2 #fundmedia #ona10 — @paidContent


Our Tweets From 10.27.2010


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$CVC-$NWS update: Fox rejects 'incomplete' Cablevision offer, says it's either all 3 stations or TV/cable. Tick tock. — @paidContent
Just added fresh analysis to my @PaidContent assessment of #newmyspace http://bit.ly/b02OGN@awallenstein
$CVC-$NWS update: as WS Game 1 looms, Cablevision offers to carry WNYW, WTXF for 1 yr. at $TWC rate. No WWOR, no cable nets. No go? — @sdkstl

$CVC-$NWS update: Cablevision calls out FCC for not acting; Fox offers one2one meeting to resume 'serious' negotiations. Fans fume. — @sdkstl
Yahoo and Microsoft have completed the ad-side integration of their search partnership — @josephtartakoff
AP gets only 20% of its revenue from newspapers, reports Rick Edmonds. Down 36% since '08. http://bit.ly/ckoblA (via @Romenesko) — @paidContent


Finding Value in Google Buzz


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bee_in_flower I’m not an early adopter of the latest tool. I’ll happily  sit back and wait for the dust to settle before I consider using any new application.

It has been my experience that this is a good practice. Most of what hits the social web usually putters and falls into obscurity.

So when Google Buzz was announced, I didn’t give it much thought.

With any tool that I use, my main objective is:

  1. To determine if it provides me value when it comes to sharing and communicating on the social web.
  2. To determine if it’s just another way to broadcast my voice. If that’s the case, I probably won’t use it.
  3. To be sure it provides value to the people who like what I share and listen to what I have to say. (most important to me)

Recently I’ve been trying to think of a way to share just the articles and resources I come across. I know some people set up a separate Twitter profile for this, but I was curious if there was another way to do this. So I thought about using Buzz. That way my friends who are already connected to me via Gmail can easily grab the information useful to them without having to dig through all my bookmarks or tweets.

I found a Firefox add-on called Buzz it! that works and is useful. It allows you to update your Buzz timeline through your Gmail. The update will include the title and the URL of the page you’re sharing. It also provides the option to edit the update and utilize Bit.ly to shorten your URLs, which I like.

I’ve just started playing with Buzz, so it remains to be seen if this will work.  Like all tools, it’s going to take some investment of time to determine if I’ll want to continue using it. I wrote off Twitter when I first  used it only to find its value the second time around.

Regardless, it’s probably not a good idea to constrain all my engagement to only one tool. Twitter has provided me tons of value and opportunities, but if it disappeared… well, then I’d better be sure I could find an adequate substitute.

Have you found any value using Google Buzz?

Lost, Twitter and the Tragedy of the Commons: A Semi-Modest Proposal


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Dear fellow “Lost” fans:

Hi there! Salivating for tonight’s show? Me too.

But I have a request. Please hear me out.

Like you, I’ve invested an embarrassingly substantial number of hours in this thing. And I can’t wait for one last season with Jack, Locke, et al. (Especially Locke. Can’t get enough Locke.)

But unlike some of you, I’m probably not going to be able to watch every show in real-time. Various life requirements are going to force me to watch at least some of these a day or two later on the DVR (or ABC.com or Hulu in a pinch).

Which would be fine, except that I’m also on Twitter a lot, and so are many of you. And many of you want to tweet about the show while it’s running and during its aftermath.

I don’t know why that is. I get the idea of Twittering along with live communal events like “American Idol” or pro football. But you guys realize that “Lost” episodes were taped months ago, right?

Anyway, I’m not here to judge! Just to ask for your help.

My ask: It’d be really great if you folks could lay off the “Lost” tweets until a few days after each show. Because otherwise, I–and, I suspect many other people, as well–will have to make an unpleasant choice: Stop using Twitter for several days a week or wade through lots and lots of spoilers. (This is apparently not a Hobbesian Choice but a Morton’s Fork. Thanks, Wikipedia!)

Yes, I think it’s theoretically possible for me to set up Twitter clients like Tweetdeck to strike some “Lost”-related tweets from my stream. But not all of them.

I also suppose we could also ask Biz Stone and crew to somehow filter out “Lost” tweets from the mainstream, but I think those guys have more important stuff to do. (One other alternative would be to ask all you Twittering real-time “Lost” watchers to head somewhere else for a bit, like Hot Potato, which is supposed to work for just this sort of thing. But I can understand if you’re not up for embracing yet another messaging service.)

So. What do you think ? I’m not asking for much, I think. Just a little near-term restraint. Let’s say two days, max.

That lets the rest of us catch up–remember, East Coasters, that the poor folks on the other side of the country are three hours behind to begin with. And then we can join the rest of you, and we can all discuss this awesome show in 140 or fewer characters.

Thanks in advance for your consideration,

Peter

P.S.: I bet the smoke monster is Jack’s dad. Or something.

New Study Suggests Most Twitterers Are Self-Absorbed (Probably Hungry?)


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Though the media set has doubtlessly taken to Twitter, a new study found that only 16% of Twitter message types are sharing a type of news or analysis, with 10% of tweets being links to blogs or articles and 6% about “politics, sports or current events.” The largest set of messages, though, is the “user’s current status” at 30% followed closely by “personal conversations” at 27%, according to a new study by SemanticHacker.

Despite the service’s potential as a forum for breaking news or an instant stream of reactions to the world at large, it appears as if most users are most comfortable in their personal bubble: “Mmm, these homemade cookies are to die for!” — something like that. Other findings of the study include:

We downloaded a sample of tweets over a two-week period using the Twitter streaming API. This resulted in a corpus of 8.9 million messages (”tweets”) posted by 2.6 million unique users. About 2.7 million of these tweets, or 31%, were replies to a tweet posted by another user, while half a million (6%) were retweets. Almost 2 million (22%) of the messages contained a URL.

As you might expect, English turns out to be the most common language used on Twitter (61%). But surprisingly, the next most common language is Portuguese (11%), beating out both Japanese (6%) and Spanish (4%).

The blog Read Write Web noted, “According to their findings, it seems that Twitter really is full of people talking about themselves. A full 57% of the sample falls into tweets about what a person is doing, or private conversations between individuals.”

Now, of course, this is not new information. A glimpse at the service — especially the usually playful trending topics — reveals that it is far from a hub of intellectualism (unless you know where to look — it can be!), but to see the content articulated as simple percentages and in chart form illustrates the data in an illuminating way.

Is it true, Twitter? Have reports of your importance been greatly exaggerated?


StatShot: Oprah Topples Gleeks on Twitter


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While the fall TV season has been all about Glee in terms of Twitter, Oprah proved that kids singing show tunes are no match for her mighty media empire. The queen of daytime announced last week that she was calling it quits on her eponymous syndicated talk show and focusing her efforts on her cable network. The move sent shock waves through the social media world, with Oprah mentions spiking at more than 48,000 tweets on Friday, though that trending topic quickly cooled over the weekend. (She’s not leaving until 2011, after all.) All said and done, more than 120,000 posts about Oprah hit Twitter last week.

Glee fans, or Gleeks, shouldn’t get too choked up over being momentarily replaced, as it still pulled in a high of more than 42,000 tweets, and got more than 87,000 tweets in total. Rounding out the top five were Heroes with 37,601, Gossip Girl got 27,806, and Saturday Night Live drew 21,469 tweets.

NOTE: The weekly top five most twittered shows is put together from an analysis of tweets matching the exact names of 63 television programs. Trendrr looks at the source data to check that at least 95 percent of the tweets are related to the show. For more metrics surrounding your favorite show, go to www.trendrr.com and put the name of the show into the search tab.



Case Study: How To Start A Trending Topic On Twitter


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trending_11-19When The Awl asked “What Were Black People Talking About Last Night?“, which Mediaite’s Robert Quigley called “lazy and, well, casually racist,” one of the things that got lost was an actually interesting question – how do these seemingly random hashtagged trending topics get started?

So we found out.

Case study: #theresway2many.

#theresway2many was the top trending topic yesterday, and is currently the third most popular trending topic of the week. You can see there’s still a steady stream of tweets featuring the trending topic (it should be noted that, from the pictures, they’re coming from a diverse group of twitterers).

And here’s how it started. On Sunday, at 2:19pmET by Ed Lover:
edlover_11-19

For those who don’t know, Ed Lover is currently a radio host in New York on Power 105 and host of a web show, and he’s the former co-host of Yo! MTV Raps. You can find him on Twitter at @MrEdLover.

Lover has 62,051 followers – which puts him in the top 1000, but just barely. He has 4,000+ tweets.

After Lover tweeted the call to start the trending topic, he used the hashtag in several subsequent tweets by RT’ing what others had come up with. But he also played along, firing off another dozen or so tweets with the hashtag over the next 16 hours. Sample: “#theresway2many reasons that I need a vacation!” or “#theresway2many Ugly dudes wit pretty girls.”

So what did we learn? Here’s a few steps if you want to start a successful hashtag trending topic:

Have a lot of followers- You don’t need to be Ashton Kutcher, but a solid 50,000 helps.

Have a dedicated fan base- Simply having followers doesn’t do it – you need people who will follow your lead, and RT your hashtag to their group of followers as well.

Pick a broad topic- As you can see from the responses, #theresway2many can go in a lot of directions, from the basic to the specific, from the serious to the obscene.

Play along- You should participate in your own hashtag, as well as others started by other people.

—–
» Follow Steve Krakauer on Twitter


Good News, T. Rowe Price! Twitter Users Really, Really Love Ads.


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times-squareSo now that Twitter has its $1 billion valuation (and another $100 million in cash, not the $50 million that I’d previously heard), how is the revenue-free company going to start making money?

The perennial, and obvious solution, is to incorporate ads into the service, but so far Twitter hasn’t tried it, except for very limited experiments.

The good news for Twitter, and its investors, is that the microblogging service’s user base is pretty receptive to advertising, in general terms, because it’s pretty receptive to just about everything on the Web.

So says research group Interpret LLC, which has a new study out today, conveniently enough. From the release:

Twitter users are twice as likely to review or rate products online (24% vs. 12%), visit company profiles (20% vs. 11%) and click on advertisements or sponsors (20% vs.9%) as those who only belong to traditional social networking websites like Facebook and MySpace. The data suggests that Twitter users uniquely demonstrate higher engagement with brands, not just with “tweets” they post.

These statistics are self-reported, and Interpret doesn’t say how big a sample its survey used, so take them with as much salt as you like. But they seem intuitively and directionally correct: Anyone willing to plug into the waves of information that Twitter pumps out is likely engaged all over the Web.

Note what the Interpret report doesn’t say: That Twitter users are eager to have ads inserted into the service itself.

Doesn’t matter. At some point, they’re unlikely to have a choice about that because it seems hard to imagine that Twitter can ever deliver on its investors’ sky-high expectations without generating some kind of money, somehow from Madison avenue.

Which is exactly why Biz Stone and crew, who once made a point of expressing their derision for ads, now make a point of saying that ads may not be such a terrible thing, after all.